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Full text of "Annual report"

I 



.«£ 



4L. 



The Town of 

IPSWICH 

Massachusetts 
1972 ANNUAL REPORT 





* 



"A friend " 

"Dedicated " 

"Always available and 
cooperative. 



■ • • • 



"The best friend we ever had 




". . . .the late chief donned a 
miniature uniform as fire 
department mascot some 50 
years ago. ..." 



Every chiUt dream - a fire suit 
and pony. 



"Buddy started as a boy dreaming of becoming fire chief someday and lie did it, and I call that true success. 
He was a damned good firefighter." 

These words of Fixe Captain Harold Wile seemed to sum up the unusual career of the late Russell Scahill this 
week - unusual not because he was a good fireman, but because he lived to do what he liked most. 

Born across the street from the fire station, it must have seemed prophetic when the late chief donned a 
miniature uniform as fire department mascot some 50 years ago to sit in the lead engine in Ipswich parades. 

Even more so 16 years ago when Frank O'Malley tapped Mr. Scahill on the shoulder and told him he had 
been unanimously elected fire chief by the board of selectmen. 

An indication of the esteem in which his fellow townsmen held him came nine years ago wheri the town 
meeting voted Chief Scahill life-time tenure - something the town has not seen fit to confer on any other official. 

It was an appropriate honor for a man whose life revolved around service to the town for 43 years - as a 
member of the forestry department, the water department, the highway department, and for 31 years, the fire 
department. 

"Buddy" Scahill did what he wanted to do most, and he did it to the best of his ability - at any time of day 
or night. 

For little boys who dream impossible dreams, the career of "Buddy Scahill should provide hope. 

Excerpts from the IPSWICH CHRONICLE, May 18, 1972 



The late Anthony Murawski. Town Clerk, swears in 
"Buddy" to the position of fire chief. 



Because he loved to see the twinkle in childrens' eyes, 
Buddy played Santa Claus. 





Would you help ? 

Quality government needs 

to find concerned and 

effective members for our 

boards and commissions. 

Are you available ? 



Please complete and return 




Name 


Town of Ipswich 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 


Address 


Telephone— Home 


Business 


Interested in 


Amount of Time 
Dates Available 


(Town Committee) 2 


TOWN OFFICES HELD 

(in Ipswich or Elsewhere) 


Present Business Affiliation and Work 


Date 
Appointed 


Office 


Term 
Expired 


Business Experience 
































Education or Special Training 




































The lining out of this form m no way assures appointment. 
All committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed 
most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. (See reverse 

side list of committees.) 








For Additional— Use Reverse Side 



Good Government Starts with You 




TOWN OFFICES 
To Which Regular Appointments Are Made 


REMARKS 


Electric Advisory Board 

Board of Assessors 

Conservation Commission 

Board of Health 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Planning Board 

Economic and Industrial Development Commission 

Recreation and Parks Committee 

Historical Commission 

Mosquito Control Committee 

Civil Defense (Auxiliary Police and Fire) 

Action, Inc. 

Finance Committee 

Registrars of Voters 

Trust Fund Commissioners 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

Government Study Committee 

MBTA Advisory Committee 

Youth Commission 

School Building Needs 

Shellfish Advisory Board 




It would be most helpful if particular fields — such as 

finance, law, engineering, etc. be emphasized on this form, 

so that the selections may be made on the best evaluation 

of interests and special qualifications possible. 


Mail to — 

Secretary, Town Manager 

Ipswich 

Massachusetts 



* 



*¥ 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

1972 ANNUAL REPORT 



^ 



♦ 



* 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



* 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 


2 


Recreation Department 


40 


Annual Town Meeting 


4 


Cemetery Department 


42 


Board of Selectmen 


22 


Public Library 


43 


Eligible for Jury Duty 


23 


Electric Board 


44 


Jury Duty 


23 


Government Study 


45 


Planning Board 


24 


Housing Authority 


45 


Zoning Board of Appeals 


25 


School Committee 


46 


Town Managers Report 


25 


Superintendent of Schools 


47 


Finance 


26 


High School Principal 


48 


Assessing 


27 


Whipple School 


49 


Treasurer - Collector 


27 


Doyon School 


50 


Town Council 


28 


Winthrop and Baptist Schools 


50 


Economic Development Commission 


29 


Bur ley, Shatswell and Boone Hall 


51 


Historical Commission 


30 


Director of Pupil Personnel Services 


52 


Youth Commission 


31 


Director of Elementary Education 


53 


Police Department 


32 


Enrollment Charts 


54 


Fire Department 


33 


Graduation Program 


55 


Civil Defense 


34 


High School Graduates 


55 


Shellfish - Harbor Department 


36 


Conservation Commission 


56 


Board of Health 


37 


Shellfish Commission 


58 


Veterans Services 


37 


17th Century Committee 


60 


Public Works 


38 


Chamber of Commerce 


61 


Building Inspector 


40 


Essex County Mosquito Control 


62 


Revenue Sharing 


Information 


63 





* 



Appreciation again is expressed to Rowley Printing, Inc. for their 
prize winning efforts in printing and organizing our Town Reports. 



* 



ELECTED 



if) 

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TOWN MODERATOR 

Harry E. Munro 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
Elizabeth S. Cole 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Paul J. Gillespie 
Edward Kozeneski 



CONSTABLE 

Bernie Spencer 



Term Expires 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Term Expires 


1973 


M. L. Scudder, Chairman 




1975 




James Collins 




1975 




Paul Gahm 




1975 




Walter J. Pojasek 




1973 




Rainer Broekel 




1973 


1975 


Edward J. Michon 




1974 


1973 


Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 




1974 


1974 








1974 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 






1975 


Glenfred A. Wanzer, Chairman 


1974 




John G. Thatcher, Jr. 




1973 




Stanley E. Eustace 




1975 




Arthur B. Weagle 




1976 




Alexander Bernhard, State 


Member 


1976 



1973 



Jane Bokron, Director 



APPOINTED 



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FINANCE COMMITTEE 




Elected At Town Meeting 




Charles C. Dalton 


1974 


Richard A. Robie 


1973 


Roger A. Burke 


1975 


Appointed By Moderator 




Nathaniel M. Quint 


1974 


Robert A. Woodburn 


1975 


Anthony J. Klos 


1973 


Appointed By Selectmen 




David W. Scudder 


1974 


William G. Markos, Chairman 


1973 


George Tsoutsouras 


1975 



TOWN MANAGER 

Richard N. Conti 

TOWN TREASURER 

George C. Mourikas 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Robert H. Leet 

TOWN CLERK 

Harold G. Comeau 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

John R. Logan 
Barbara J. Rousseau 
John Kobos 
Harold G. Comeau, Clerk 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pedrick 
William R. Lewis 
John D. Heaphy 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Arthur N. Moon 



1975 
1973 
1974 



1975 



SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Charles R. Terrell, Chairman 

Edward Nagus 

Andrew Gianakakis 

Edward Paquin 

Joseph Kmiec 

Joseph Lauderowicz 

Henry Minichello 

Arthur Moon, ex-officio member 

TREE WARDEN 

Armand T. Michaud 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Ralph Hebert 

PLANNING BOARD 

William L. Thoen, Chairman 
John P. Prosser 
George A. Nikas 
Jason A. Sokolov 
Curtis R. Tuttle 



1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 



1975 





Dr. William C. Wigglesworth, Chairman 


1975 




Dr. Joseph W. Adamowic/ 


1974 


1973 


Norman L. Quint 


1973 




Roland R. Foucher, Agent 


1973 


1974 


CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 






Gordon C. Player, Chairman 


1974 




Leon B. Turner 


1973 


1973 


Nicholas A. Markos 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Supt. 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 


1975 


1974 


Mark J. Apsey 


1975 




Elton McCausland 


1973 




John T. Beagen 


1972 


1975 






1973 


TOWN COUNSEL 




1974 


F. Dale Vincent, Jr. 


1973 



1973 



1976 
1974 
1975 
1973 
1977 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr., Vice Chair. 
S. Harold Perley 
Thaddeus Maciejowski 
Ho Hie A. Bucklin, Jr. 
Sharon Josephson, Alternate 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Sarah L. Weatherall, Chairman 
Frederic Winthrop, Jr. 
William C. Hickling 
Costos Tsoutsouris 
Dr. Robert L. Goodale 
William E. George 
Andrew G. Connor 

ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Carman Marciano, Chairman 
Terrance R. McSweeney 
Peter W. Williamson 
Thomas B. Emery 
Richard L. Banville 
Dale E. Dudgeon 
Norman L. MacLeod, Jr. 
Louis Jo sly n 
John H. Rieman 

RECREATION & PARKS COMMITTEE 

Charles J. Foley, Chairman 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis 
Eleanor Knowles 
Frederick Jenkins 
Douglas P. Holland 
James H. Daly, Director 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Irving Small, Chairman 

Jacob Israelsohn 

William H. Smith 

John Eby 

Gordon Burlingham 

Peter Zervas 

Alfred D. Castantini 

Mrs. Jessie Girard 

Mrs. Maryruth Williamson 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 
Barbara C. Emberly 
Louise B. Hodgkins 
George R. Mathey 
Lovell Thompson 
Alice Keenan 
John H. Updike 

CWIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 

John R. Harrigan 

MOSQUITO CONTROL COMMITTEE 

Alice Keenan, Chairman 
Byron Bennett 
Marion Clarkin 
Herbert Brack 
Harold Balch 
James Breton 
Cynthia A. Burns 



MBTA ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



1977 
1975 
1973 
1974 
1976 
1973 

1973 
1974 
1975 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1975 



1973 
1975 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1975 
1977 
1977 
1976 

1974 
1975 
1974 
1973 
1975 
1973 



1973 
1975 
1975 
1975 
1973 
1973 
1974 

1973 

1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 



John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman 


1973 


Harold F. Balch 


1973 


Bruce R. Ball 


1973 


Raymond S. Barrows 


1973 


Leland Carter 


1973 


Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 


1973 


Cornelius Cleary 


1973 


James C. McManaway 


1973 


Robert K. Weatherall 


1973 


Robert B. Waldner 


1973 


Mrs. Doris Greenlaw 


1973 


ELECTRIC ADVISORY BOARD 




George H. Bouchard, Chairman 


1973 


Donald F. Talcott 


1973 


Alexander A. Sweenie, Jr. 


1973 


John H. Ward 


1973 


Lawrence R. Sweetser 


1973 


George E. Taylor 


1973 


Thomas A. Ercoline, Jr. 


1973 


Alan Whitehead 


1973 


John A. Pe chilis 


1973 



SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS COMMITTEE 

Harold Nelson, Chairman 
Joseph McGee 
Richard Robie 
Edwin Damon 
James Collins 
William J. Murphy 

YOUTH COMMISSION 

Annette I. George, Director 1973 

Brother Robert Russell, Chairman 1973 

David Baldwin 1974 

George W. Pacheco 1973 

Cathleen McGinley 1973 

Mary Graffum 1975 

Peter Haskell 1973 

Deborah Hovey 1975 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Ralph M. O'Brien 1973 

WIRING INSPECTOR 

Alfred Tobiasz 1973 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Glenfred A. Wanzer 1973 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A.NJX Hyde 1973 

ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Rene Rathe 1973 

BELL RINGER 

Harold D. Bowen 1973 

INSECT PEST CONTROL SUPERINTENDENT 

Armand Michaud 1975 



DOG OFFICER 

Thomas W. Atkins 



1973 



IS 



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O 



ESSEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said 

County. 

GREETINGS: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Ipswich qualified to vote in town affairs to 
meet at the Ipswich High School in said Ipswich on 
MONDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF MARCH, 1972 
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening to act on the following 
articles viz: 

Moderator Harry Munro called the meeting to order 
at 7:30 p.m. He announced that the quorum needed 
was 299, and 318 voters were present. A final count 
showed 727 voters in attendance. 

The Moderator announced that there were a number 
of non-registered guests observing the meeting, among 
them photography students, girl scouts, and cub scouts. 

The following tellers were appointed by the 
Moderator: Louise Hodgkins, William J. Murphy, John 
G. Thatcher, Jr., Carrie Shannon, Norman L. MacLeod, 
Raymond Courage, Philip Stewart, and James 
Theodosopoulos. 

A Salute to the Flag was led by Town Clerk Harold 
G. Comeau. 

The Invocation was given by Father William Malea, 
Pastor, St. Joseph's Church. 

Moved by Mr. Joseph Navarro that the Town Clerk 
read the opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant 
and the Constable's Return. Seconded. Unanimous Voice 
Vote. Town Clerk Harold Comeau read the opening and 
closing paragraphs of the Warrant and the Constable's 
Return. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the body assembled stand in 
a moment of silence for the late Town Clerk Anthony 
Murawski, and also for Edmund Kelleher, Maurice 
Robishaw, Dr. Frank Collins, Jesse Leet, Lewis 
Clements, and William Dunbar, all former Town officials 
and employees now deceased. 



Article 1 : To fix the salary and compensation of all 
elected town officers. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro to fix the salary and 
compensation of all elected town officers as in the 1972 
budget. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 2: To choose the following officers, viz:- 
Moderator for one (1) year 
Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years 
Constable for one (1) year 
Three (3) Members of the School Committee for 

three (3) years 
And to vote "Yes" or "No" to the following 

questions: 

Quesion No. 1: "Shall Licenses be granted in this 
town for the operation, holding or conducting a game 
commonly called Beano?" 



The above article to be voted on one ballot at their 
respective polling places as follows: 
Precinct 1 Ipswich Junior High School, Green Street 
Precinct 2 Winthrop School, Central Street 
Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street 
Precinct 4 Burley School, Mount Pleasant Avenue 
on Monday, March 13, 1972. The polls shall open at 10 
a.m. and close at 8 p.m. 

No action required. 

Article 3: To choose one member of the Finance 
Committee to serve for three (3) years. 

Moved by Mr. John Bialek that Mr. Roger Burke be 
nominated to the Finance Committee to serve for three 
years. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 4: To hear and act upon the report of the 
Finance Committee, and raise and appropriate and 
transfer money for the ensuing year, including the 
compensation of elected town officers. 



Moved by Mr. William Markos that the 
$5,018,208.00 be raised and appropriated 
purposes hereinafter designated: 



sum of 
for the 



May 1, 1972 
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

I, Harold G. Comeau, Town Clerk of the Town of 
Ipswich, hereby certify that the following changes to be 
made to Article 4 of the 1972 Annual Town Meeting, 
as requested by the Finance Committee, as incorrect 
figures that were inserted in the motion. 



$2,197,808.00 
$1,996,390.88 



ARTICLE 4 

1. For the Operating Budget 

Change from: $2,197 ,223.00 To 

Amount to be Raised and Assessed 
Change from: SI ,995,815.88 To 
(Breakdown to remain the same) 
The total recommended budgets are 

Change from: $5,018,208.00 To: $5,018,783.00 
Available funds 
No change 
The total amount to be raised and assessed 

Change from: $4,778,477.83 To: $4,779,052.83 



ATTEST 

HAROLD G. 

Town Clerk 



COMEAU 



For the Operating Budget 
of this: 



$2,197,233.00 



$ 25,000.00 

56.00 

8,000.00 

2,221.12 

7,140,00 

159,000.00 

1,995,815.88 



from Overlay Surplus to the 

Reserve Fund 

from Highway Machinery Fund 

from Sewer Receipts Reserve 

from County Dog Refund 

from Water Pollution Control Fund 

from "free cash" 

to be raised and assessed 



2. For the Library Budget 

of this: 
$ 2,136.00 
59,507.00 



61,643.00 



from Library Aid Reserve 
to be raised and assessed 



3. For the School Budget 
for the following purposes: 



2,759,332.00 



Administration 
Instruction 
Other School 

Athletics 
Oper. & Maint 
Fixed Charges 
Acquisition of 
Programs with 

of this: 

$ 7,500.00 

3,991.00 

11,500.00 

4,266.45 

8,419.60 

500.00 

2,723,154.95 



Services and 

. of Plant 

Fixed Assets 
Other Districts 



$ 68,041.00 
2,056,934.00 

316,024.00 

237,622.00 

36,772.00 

34,239.00 

9,700.00 



from the Feoffees 

from P.L. 874 

from Driver Education Fund 

from Title V NDEA 

from Title III NDEA 

Brown School Fund 

to be raised and assessed 



The total recommended budgets are 

The total available funds are 

The total to be raised and assessed is 

Seconded. 



$5,018,208.00 

239,730.17 

4,778,477.83. 



Mr. Markos spoke on the motion stating that the 
tax increase is relatively small, possibly $2.00 but best 
guess is $1.00. He stated that the budget increase was 
a relatively modest four percent (4%). 

The hand count was carried with 526 voting in the 
affirmative, 1 opposed. 

I. OPERATING BUDGET 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1. MODERATOR 
Salary 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

2. SELECTMEN 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

3. FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

4. PLANNING BOARD 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

5. ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

6. APPEALS BOARD 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



100.00 

25 

125 



6,431 
2,505 

8,936 



100 
900 

1,000 



500 
1 1 ,700 

130 
12,330 



9,450 
2,950 

12,400 



125 
150 



7. TOWN MANAGER 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

8. ACCOUNTANT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

9. TREASURER & COLLECTOR 
Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

10. ASSESSOR 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

11. BILLING DEPT.(1) 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

12. TOWN CLERK 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

13. LEGAL DEPT. 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

14. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

15. HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Expenses 

16. CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

17. HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 
Expenses 

18. NUCLEAR ADVISORY 

Expenses 

19. IPSWICH YOUTH COMMISSION 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



31,855 

16,075 

300 

48,230 



24,954 

7,800 

250 

33,004 



28,357 

3,707 

250 

32,314 



22,941 
3,419 

26,360 



11,551 
665 

12,216 



10,908 
370 

11^78 



100 
450 
550 



300 



200 

550 

2,500 

3,250 



225 



275 TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1,375 
4,900 
1,443 
7,718 



$210,511 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

20. POLICE DEPT. 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

21. FIRE DEPT. 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

22. CIVIL DEFENSE 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total 

23. SHELLFISH & HARBOR 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

24. BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 

HEALTH & SANITATION 

25. TOWN HEALTH AGENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

26. OUTSIDE CONTRACTS 
Garbage Collection 
Rubbish Collection 
Dump Maintenance 

Total 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 

VETERANS SERVICES 

27. VETERANS BENEFITS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Total 







B) Memorial Building (2) 








Salaries & Wages 


— 






Expenses 


2,975 


200,616 




Total 


2,975 


11,320 




C) Sewer Building 




9,330 




Expenses 


500 


221,266 




D) Fire Building 








Expenses 


2,775 






Capital Outlay 


440 


172,619 




Total 


3,215 


1 1 ,850 




E) Town Garage 




1,600 




Expenses 


2,200 


186,069 




Capital Outlay 


— 






Total 


2,200 






F) Cemetery Buildings 




1,000 




Expenses 


595 


1,025 




G) Park Buildings 




2,550 




Expenses 


850 


4,575 




Rent 


2,470 






Total 


3,320 






H) Library Building(3) 




9,387 




Expenses 


2,425 


5,625 




Capital Outlay 


3,600 


— 






6.025 


15,012 


30. 


HIGHWAY DIVISION 








Salaries & Wages 


68,222 


6,800 
760 




Expenses 


93,135 




Capital Outlay 


18,500 


/ Kj\J 

7,560 




Total 


179,857 


434,482 


31. 


EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 






Salaries & Wages 


16,416 






Expenses 


31,350 






Capital Outlay 


1,201 






Total 


48,967 


14,480 
9,430 


32. 


SNOW & ICE CONTROL 






Salaries & Wages 


16,000 


23,910 




Expenses 


20,000 




Outside Rentals 


7,000 






Total 


43,000 


27,000 


33. 


FORESTRY 




52,000 




Salaries & Wages 


34,596 


35,000 




Expenses 


14,700 


1 14,000 




Capital Outlay 


600 






Total 


49,896 


137,910 










34. 


SEWER 








Salaries & Wages 


17,524 






Expenses 


14,205 






Capital Outlay 


— 






Total 


31,729 


146,000 








146,000 


TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


$405,754 



PUBLIC WORKS 



RECREATION & PARKS 



28. ADMINISTRATION 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

29. BUILDING DIVISION 
A) Town Hall 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



35. 



1 1 ,924 
1,970 

13,894 



6,531 
6,050 
7,000 

19,581 



36. 



RECREATION & PARKS 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



CEMETERIES 



CEMETERIES 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



47,544 

14,870 

5,185 

67,599 



39,589 

12,179 

4,575 

56,343 





INSURANCE 




37 


INSURANCE 






Workmen's Compensation 


30,000 




Package Insurance 


37,000 




Public Officials Bond 


670 




Fire & Police 


3,000 




Total 


70,670 




EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 




38. 


BENEFITS 






Military Service Credits 


9,000 




County Retirement System 


166,720 




Health & Life 


45,000 




Other 


— 




Total 


220,720 




DEBT SERVICE 


i 


39. 


DEBT SERVICE 






Payment of Interest 


49,819 




Payment of Principal 


338,000 




Total 


387,819 




UNCLASSIFIED 




40. 


ENCUMBRANCES 


— 


41. 


RESERVE FUND(4) 


25,000 


42. 


BOND ISSUE COSTS 


5,000 


43. 


INTEREST ON TAX ANTICIPATION 


30,000 




Total 


60,000 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


$2,197,233 




II. LIBRARY 




44. 


LIBRARY OPERATING 






Salaries & Wages 


46,443 




Expenses 


15,200 




Capital Outlay 


— 




Total 


61,643 




III. SCHOOL 




45. 


SCHOOL BUDGET* 






Administration 


68,041 




Instruction 


2,056,934 




Other School Services & Athletics 


316,024 




Oper. & Maint. of Plant 


237,622 




Fixed Charges 


36,772 




Acquisition of Fixed Assets 


34,239 




Programs With Other Districts 


9,700 




Encumbrances From Other Years 


— 




Total 


$2,759,332 



SUMMARY OF BUDGETS I, II, & III $5,018,783 



*Does not include Whittier Vocational 
Expenditure Expended by Article 



$60,725 



FOOTNOTES: 

(1) Billing Dept. moved to Electric & Water in 1970. 

(2) Memorial Building - Custodian's Salary moved to 
Recreation & Parks in 1971. 

(3) Library Building - Custodian's Salary paid out of 
the Library Budget in 1971 & 1972. 

(4) RESERVE FUND - Disbursements for 1970 
(19,949) and 1971 ($18,777) have been properly 
reflected in the Town Budget Categories where the 
actual transfers were applied. 



Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue for the financial years 
beginning January 1, 1972 and January 1, 1973 in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Moved by Mr. Charles Cobb that the Town 
authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue for. the financial years 
beginning January 1, 1972, and January 1, 1973, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Seconded. Unanimous 
Voice Vote. Finance Committee recommends. 

Article 6: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the current expense 
of the Water Department, the same to be paid from 
revenues by the Water Department during the year 
1972, and to see what action the Town will take in 
regard to surplus funds. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the Town raise and 
appropriate a sum of $205,398.00 for the current 
expenses of the Water Department; the same to be 
paid from revenues by the Water Department during 
the year 1972, and further that the sum of 
$11,407.93 be transferred from the water surplus. 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Unanimous 
Voice Vote. Motion carried. 

Article 7: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum to 
be made available for said purpose from the Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Moved by Mrs. Elizabeth Cole that $700.00 be 
appropriated to be used in conjunction with a 
matching sum of the Chamber of Commerce of 
Ipswich for the purpose of the promotion of the 
Town of Ipswich. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends. Unanimous Voice Vote. Motion carried. 

Article 8: To see what action the Town will take 
to the transfer of any surplus funds in the Electric 
Light Department. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb that the Town transfer 
$36,000 from the Surplus Account of the Electric 
Light Department to the General Fund for the 
purpose of reducing taxes. Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends. Motion carried by Unanimous 
Voice Vote. 

Article 9: To see what sum the Town will raise 
and appropriate to pay unpaid bills incurred in 
previous years and remaining unpaid. 

Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that the sum of 
$1,109.55 be appropriated to pay unpaid bills incurred 
in previous years and remaining unpaid, as follows: 



Equipment Maintenance (Police CAr) $ 750.00 
Conservation Commission (Clerk's Salary) 18.75 
Health Department (Animal Burial) 18.00 

Health Department (Ambulance) 322.80 

$1,109.55 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Motion 
carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 10: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for construction of 
roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the sum of $39,000 be 
raised and appropriated for the construction of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommends. Motion carried by 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 11: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for the Maintenance 
of roads under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the sum of $4,500 be 
raised and appropriated for the maintenance of roads 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws. Seconded. 
Finance Committee recommends. Motion carried by 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 12: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to cover the Town's 
share of the annual planning, operating, and debt 
service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District. 

Moved by Mr. Robert Weatherall that the Town 
raise and appropriate the sum of $60,725.00 to pay 
the Town's apportioned share of the annual planning, 
operating, and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Technical High School District for the year 
1972. Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. 
Motion carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 13: To see if the Town will raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to compensate landowners 
for proposed takings under eminent domain and 
Chapter 79 of the General Laws necessary for the 
widening and relocation of Linebrook Road and to 
determine whether such appropriations shall be raised 
by borrowing or otherwise or to take any other 
actions with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole that the Town vote to 
appropriate a sum of $4,500.00; said money to be 
used by the Board of Selectmen to compensate land 
owners for proposed takings under eminent domain, in 
accordance with Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
resulting from the widening and rebuilding of 
Linebrook Road. Seconded. Finance Committee 
recommends. Two-thirds vote required. Motion carried 
by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 14: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money to repair and make 
necessary alterations to the Payne School to be used 
as administrative offices of the School Department and 
to determine whether such appropriation shall be 
raised by borrowing or otherwise or take any other 
action with respect thereto. 



Moved by Mr. Edward Damon that the Town 
appropriate $49,258.00 for remodeling, reconstruction 
or making extraordinary repairs to the Payne School 
and that to raise this appropriation the sum of 
$9,258.00 be included in the 1972 tax levy, and that 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
authorized to issue $40,000.00 of bonds or notes' of 
the Town under General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7. 
The Superintendent of Schools, with the approval of 
the School Committee is authorized to contract for 
and accept any Federal or State aid for this project 
provided that the total authorized borrowing shall be 
reduced by the amount of said aid. Seconded. 

Mr. Damon stated that there were three desirable 
goals contained in the article: 1) to enable the school 
administration to function efficiently in a structure to 
accommodate all needs; 2) $6900.00 would be 
realized, the amount paid for rented facilities; and 3) 
allow to dramatically upgrade appearance of building. 
Mr. Damon also stated that this article has the 
unanimous support of the School Committee. Finance 
Committee recommends. A two-thirds vote is required 
and so stated by Town Counsel. 

Mr. Mark Apsey, representing Ipswich Environmental 
Quality, Inc. spoke in favor of this article. 

Motion carried by hand count with 544 voting in 

the affirmative, 44 opposed. 

Article 15: To see if the Town will appropriate a 
sum of money to install a central air conditioning 
system in the Payne School and to determine whether 
such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise or take any other action with respect 
thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Damon that the sum of $9,075.00 
be raised and appropriated to install a central air 
conditioning system in the Payne School. Seconded. 
School Committee unanimously supports this article. 
Finance Committee recommends. 

In answer to a question asked by Mr. Lee Carter as 
to why this was not included in the original article, 
Mr. Damon answered that at the time the School 
Committee voted to endorse the renovation of the 
Payne School, they did not consider air conditioning, 
and there was a time limit on entering the article in 
the Warrant. Mr. Damon added that he did not want 
to see the main article lost because people did not 
want air conditioning. 

In answer to a question raised by Mr. John Prosser, 
Mr. Damon stated that the costs mentioned in the 
motions were absolute. The only cost in addition to 
present operating costs would be heat. Electric heat is 
being proposed and would entail a slightly higher cost, 
an estimated $400.00 per year as opposed to a 
present average of $20-$30 per month. 

Motion defeated by hand count with 264 voting in 
the affirmative, 335 opposed. 

Article 16: To see if the Town will appropriate a 
sum of money to construct additions and 
improvements, or alterations to the sanitary sewer 
system and authorize the Town Manager, acting as 
Sewer Commissioner to apply and negotiate for such 



8 






Federal and-or State aid as may be available, and to 
take any other action as shall be in the interest of 
the Town in improving and-or adding to the sanitary 
sewer system, and to see what method the Town will 
adopt to raise and appropriate such sum by borrowing, 
or otherwise, or to take any action with respect 
thereto. 



Moved by Mr. Navarro that the sum of 
$466,000.00 be appropriated for the construction of 
sewer extensions in the central core areas and 
Topsfield Road area, substantially in accordance with a 
plan on file in the office of the Town Clerk and that 
to raise this appropriation the sum of $3,460.63, said 
sum be entire balance of the Rehabilitation Fund plus 
interest to date, be transferred to the general funds, 
and that the sum of $62,539.37 be so transferred 
from the sewer receipts reserve fund, and that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
authorized to issue $400,000 of bonds or notes of the 
town under the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, 
as amended. The Town Manager with the approval of 
the Selectmen, is authorized to contract for and 
accept any Federal or State aid for this project 
provided that the total authorized borrowing shall be 
reduced by the amount of said aid. Seconded 



Mr. Navarro stated that this article was intended to 
fill in existing problem areas that remain in the 
central areas of town and listed the streets to be 
sewered. There were several questions on which streets 
were to be sewered and when, and answers were given 
by Mr. Navarro and Mr. Bialek. Because of some 
apparent confusion, Mr. Navarro stated that the item 
under discussion was for sewer main, not sewer 



treatment, and if there were any further questions the 
plans for various projects are on file in the Town 
Clerk's office. The Finance Committee recommends, 
and this article does nothing to the tax rate. 



A two-thirds vote is required and so stated by the 
Moderator. The motion carried with 525 voting in the 
affirmative, 26 opposed. 



Article 17: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money to be used in 
conjunction with matching funds from the 
Commonwealth for installing a storm drain to enclose 
a portion of Farley Brook. 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the town raise and 
appropriate the sum of $14,000 to be used in 
conjunction with matching funds from the 
Commonwealth for installing a storm drain to enclose 
a portion of Farley Brook, described on a plan 
entitled "Proposed Stream Improvements, Concrete Pipe 
Conduits and Appurtenances, Farley Brook (Wildes 
Court to Granite Court) Ipswich by Department of 
Public Works of the Massachusetts Division of 
Waterways, Athanasos A. Vulgeropoulos, Consulting 
Engineer, 26 Tudor Street, Waltham, Mass." as revised; 
said plan being on file in the office of the Director 
of Public Works. Seconded. 



Mr. Bialek spoke briefly on this article and read a 

letter from the Massachusetts Division of Waterways. 

Finance Committee recommends in favor. Unanimous 
Voice Vote. 



Harry Munro - Town Moderator 



(Ipswich Chronicle) 




SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 



MARCH 6, 1972 



At 9:00 p.m. and after a short recess Moderator 
Harry Munro called the Special Town Meeting to 
order. The Moderator explained the purpose of the 
Special Town Meeting within Town Meeting. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town Clerk read 
the opening and closing paragraphs of the Warrant and 
the Constable's Return. Seconded. Unanimous Voice 
Vote. Town Clerk Harold Comeau read the opening 
and closing paragraphs of the Warrant and Constable's 
Return. 

Article 1 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purposes of pur- 
chasing a Fire Ladder Truck for use principally by the 
Fire Department and to determine whether such appro- 
priation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise or 
take any other actions with respect thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Gillespie that the town appropriate 
$75,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing a fire ladder 
truck and that to raise this appropriation the sum of 
$15,000 be included in the 1972 tax levy, and that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be 
authorized to issue $60,000 of bonds or notes of the 
town under General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7. The 
Town Manager with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to contract for and accept any Federal or 
State aid for this project provided that the total author- 
ized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of said 
aid, and that the disposition of this question be de- 
termined by ballot in accordance with Chapter 3 of the 
Town By-Laws at the part of this annual meeting de- 
voted to the election of officers. Seconded. 

Mr. Gillespie spoke on this article and explained 
that the unusual procedure was necessary because of a 
question raised by bond counsel on the use of the 
words "raise and appropriate" in the article as it 
appeared in the Warrant. Mr. Gillespie further stated 
that the existing truck is 25 years old, and they are 
expected to last 20 to 25 years. Board of Selectmen 
recommends. Finance Committee recommends. 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Special Town 
Meeting be dissolved. Seconded and carried by voice 
vote. The Moderator declared the Special Town 
Meeting dissolved at 9:14 p.m. 

Article 18: To see if the Town will accept Howe 
Street, Allen Lane, et al, specifically as shown on plan 
of streets to be accepted by Town of Ipswich from 
Campanelli Builders, Inc. on file at the Town Clerk's 
Office. 

Moved by Mrs. Cole that the town accept Howe 
Street, Allen Lane, Birch Lane, James Road, and Edge 
Street, as shown on a plan of streets on file in the 
office of the Town Clerk. Seconded. Mr. William 
Davis, Chairman, Planning Board, stated that this 
article was unanimously recommended by the Planning 
Board. Finance Committee recommends. Board of 
Selectmen recommends. Unanimous Voice Vote. Motion 
carried. 



Article 19: To see if the Town should request the 
Trustees to take such legal steps to change the Trusts 
creating the Ipswich Public Library and to allow the 
Town of Ipswich to take over all assets of the 
Trustees of the Public Library, real and personal, and 
to take over control and operation of the Library and 
to run it as a town function in accordance with 
Chapter 78, Section 10 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. 

Moved by Mr. Daniel Poor, Treasurer, Ipswich 
Public Library, that the town request the Trustees to 
take such legal steps to change the Trusts creating the 
Ipswich Public Library and to allow the Town of 
Ipswich to take over all assets of the Trustees of the 
Public Library, real and personal, and to take over 
control and operation of the Library and to run it as 
a town function in accordance with Chapter 78, 
Section 10 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
Seconded. Mr. Poor explained that it was impossible 
to vote to expand as long as the library was not 
physically town property. 

Mrs. Ann Marsh, President of Friends of Ipswich 
Public Library urged support of this article. Finance 
Committee recommends. Board of Selectmen 
recommends. Unanimous Voice Vote. Motion carried. 

Article 20: To see if the Town will vote to 
appropriate a sum to the Stabilization Fund. 

Moved by Mr. William Markos that the sum of 
$34,000.00 be appropriated and transferred from "Free 
Cash" into the Stabilization Fund. Seconded. Motion 
carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 21: To hear and act upon the reports of 
committees, and to continue such committees as the 
Town may vote to continue. 

Mr. Harold J. Nelson, Chairman, Linebrook School 
Addition Construction Committee, read report of said 
committee. He moved that the report be accepted and 
the committee be discontinued. Seconded. Unanimous 
Voice Vote. 

Mr. Harold J. Nelson, Chairman, School Building 
Needs Committee, read report of said committee. He 
moved that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous Voice vote. 

Mr. John Conley, Chairman, Historic District Study 
Committee read report of said committee. He moved 
that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Mr. Irving Small, Chairman, Government Study 
Committee, read report of said committee. He moved 
that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Mr. John C. Vincent, Jr., Chairman, M.B.T.A. Study 
Committee, read report of said committee. He moved 
that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Mrs. Alice E. Keenan, Chairman, Ipswich Mosquito 
Control Committee, read report of said committee. She 
moved that the report be accepted and the committee 
continued. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 



10 



Article 22: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase and 
erection of bleachers and press box for the High 
School Athletic Field. (Ten-Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Andrew Alexson that the town raise 
and appropriate the sum of $8400.00 for the purchase 
and erection of bleachers for the High School athletic 
field. Seconded. Mr. Alexson stated that this article 
would provide 600 additional seats. Finance Committee 
recommends. Hand count necessary and so stated by 
the Moderator. Motion carried with 476 voting in the 
affirmative, 101 opposed. 

Article 23: To see what action the Town will take 
relative to a 42-hour work week for Ipswich 
Firefighters, effective July 1, 1972, while continuing 
with 10 and 14-hour shifts. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Sam Chouinard that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous Voice 
Vote. 

Article 24: To see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, purchase or otherwise for the purpose 
of constructing thereon a reservoir, pumping station, 
and water treatment facility, the following parcels of 
land, together with necessary rights of way and water 
rights: Beginning at a point 270 feet, more or less, 
from the easterly corner of land of Rice, running on 
several courses southeasterly and northeasterly 1420 
feet, more or less, by land of said Rice, thence on 
several courses northeasterly, southeasterly, southerly 
2570 feet, more or less, by land of the Estate of 
Tougas; thence on one course in a southeasterly 
direction 1100 feet, more or less, by land of 
Pappalimberis to land now or formerly of Saroka; 
thence by land now or formerly of Saroka, Sheppard 
and Ciolek; thence southeasterly to Topsfield Road; 
thence along Topsfield Road to property of Hall; 
thence northwesterly along property of Hall to 
property of Pappalimberis; thence northeasterly along 
property now or formerly of Hall and Arthur; thence 
northwesterly by land of Pappalimberis 1300 feet, 
more or less; thence on two courses 775 feet, more 
or less, on land now of H & H Realty; thence 
northwesterly 570 feet, more or less, on land of 
Pappalimberis to land of Markos; thence northeasterly 
200 feet, more or less, into land of Markos; thence 
northeasterly 125 feet, more or less to land of 
Pappalimberis; thence 300 feet, more or less by land 
of Pappalimberis to Pineswamp Road; thence 
northwesterly 55 feet across Pineswamp Road; thence 
northwesterly 640 feet, more or less, by land of Ladd; 
thence 1220 feet, more or less, on land now or 
formerly of Chapman to land of Wegzyn; thence along 
several courses southwesterly, a distance of 1300 feet, 
more or less, on land of Wegzyn to land of Kamon; 
thence southwesterly 590 feet, more or less by land 
of Kamon; thence southerly 40 feet, more or less 
across Pineswamp Road; thence southerly 270 feet, 
more or less, by Pineswamp Road and land of Rice; 
aforesaid, to the point of beginning. Meaning to 
describe herein lands of Rice, Estate of Tougas, 
Wegzyn, Chapman, H & H Realty, Pappalimberis, and 
Kamon as shown on a plan by Essex Survey Service 
and on file with the Town Clerk; making use of 
available State and Federal Aid, and to appropriate a 
sum off money therefor, and to determine whether 



such appropriations shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise. 

Moved by Mr. Gillespie that the town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by 
eminent domain, purchase or otherwise for the purpose 
of constructing thereon a reservoir, pumping station, 
and water treatment facility, the following parcels of 
land, together with necessary rights of way and water 
rights: Beginning at a point 270 feet, more or less, 
from the easterly corner of land of Rice, running on 
several courses southeasterly 1420 feet, more or less, 
by land of said Rice; thence on several courses 
northeasterly, southeasterly, southerly 2,570 feet, more 
or less, on land of the Estate of Tougas; to land of 
Pappalimberis; thence on one course in a southeasterly 
direction 1100 feet, more or less, by land of 
Pappalimberis to land now or formerly of Saroka; 
thence 280 feet, more or less, by land now or 
formerly of Saroka, Sheppard, and Ciolek; thence 
southeasterly 295 feet, more or less to Topsfield 
Road; thence along Topsfield Road 50 feet more or 
less, to property of Hall; thence northwesterly 303 
feet more or less, along property of Hall to property 
of Pappalimberis; thence northeasterly 205 feet, more 
or less, along property now or formerly of Hall and 
Arthur; thence northwesterly by land of Pappalimberis 
1650 feet, more or less to the southwesterly corner of 
Lot 47 as shown on Compiled Plan of Land in 
Ipswich, February 18, 1972, showing proposed takings 
for Kimball Brook Reservoir, by Essex Survey Service, 
Inc., 47 Federal Street, Salem; thence 156.32 feet to 
Heard Drive, a private way as shown on said plan; 
thence by said Lot 47 northwesterly 118 feet to the 
northeasterly corner of said lot; thence northeasterly 
51.82 feet by property line of Pappalimberis; thence 
northwesterly 640 feet more or less, on land of 
Pappalimberis to land of Markos; thence northwesterly 
200 feet more or less into land of Markos; thence 
southwesterly 125 feet, more or less, to land of 
Pappalimberis; thence 300 feet more or less, by land 
of Pappalimberis to Pineswamp Road; thence 
northwesterly 55 feet more or less, across Pineswamp 
Road; thence northeasterly 130 feet more or less, 
along Pineswamp Road to property of Ladd; thence 
Northwesterly 670 feet, more or less, by land of 
Ladd; thence southwesterly 1140 feet more or less, on 
land of Pelletier to land of Wegzyn; thence along 
several courses southwesterly, a distance of 1440 feet 
more or less on land of Wegzyn to land of Kamon; 
thence southwesterly 370 feet more or less, on land 
of Kamon; thence southerly 40 feet, more or less, 
across Pineswamp Road, to point of beginning; 
meaning to describe herein lands of Rice, Estate of 
Tougas, Wegzyn, Pelletier, Meadowbrook Builders, Inc., 
Pappalimberis, and Kamon, all as shown on a plan by 
Essex Survey Service heretofore referred to and on file 
with the Town Clerk. And that the sum of 
$240,000.00 be appropriated therefore; and that to 
raise this appropriation the Treasurer of the Town of 
Ipswich with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow $240,000.00 under General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 8. The Town Manager, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to contract 
for and accept any Federal or State aid for this 
project provided that the total authorized borrowing 
shall be reduced by the amount of said aid. Seconded. 

Finance Committee approves this article voting 5 in 
favor, 3 opposed, 1 abstention. Planning Board 



11 



recommends this article. Conservation Commission Witnesseth this day of March 1972, for and in 

recommends this article. The Selectmen recommend consideration of the covenants herein expressed it is 
this article voting 4 in favor, 1 opposed. agreed: 



Mr. Gillespie spoke on this article stating that it 
would give the Board of Selectmen the authority to 
enter into negotiations to put this land aside for a 
solution to water needs. He further stated that no 
Ipswich citizen would have their land taken by this 
vote, but it would allow for negotiations. 

Mr. Kenneth McMullen urged voters to pass this 
article. Mr. John Vincent requested that Ipswich 
Environmental Quality be recorded as in favor of this 
article. 

Mr. John Bialek stated that his vote was the 
Selectmen's vote opposing this article. He referred to a 
report that stated the water of Bull Brook is as good 
as that of Dow Reservoir with treatment. 

Attorney Terrence Perkins, representing the Ramon 
family, spoke in opposition to the motion. Attorney 
Raymond Sullivan, representing Markos and 
Papplimberis, also spoke in opposition to this article. 

Mrs. Bette Siegel and Mrs. Sharon Josephson, 
members of the League of Women Voters, urged 
support of this article. Mr. David Scudder of the 
Finance Committee stated that there was no assurance 
that the state might fund a regional reserve project in 
which we might share. 

Mr. Terrence Perkins read a proposed amendment to 
the main article which would allow adequate time to 
consider taking by eminent domain alter reviewing the 
state report. 

Mr. Raymond Sullivan moved to substitute the 
amendment for the main motion. Seconded. Town 
Counsel Dale Vincent moved to amend the substitute 
motion by including words "heirs and assigns". Mr. 
Perkins agreed. Seconded. After a short recess for the 
purpose of reviewing the substitute amendment, Mr. 
Charles Dalton of the Finance Committee stated that 
the Finance Committee approves the substitute 
amendment. 

The Moderator then stated that a vote would be 
taken first on the substitute amendment which 
required a majority vote to carry. If this lost, a vote 
would then be taken on the original article which 
required a two-thirds vote to carry. The Moderator 
then asked Mr. Sullivan to again read the substitute 
amendment for the main motion originally moved by 
Mr. Perkins: 

I move that the Town authorize the Town Manager 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to 
execute on behalf of the town the following 
agreement with any or all owners of the land specified 
in said agreement and plan referred to therein, for the 
purpose of insuring adequate water supply for the 
Town in accordance with Chapter 313 of the Acts of 
1890, Chapter 620 of the Acts of 1966 and the 
General Laws, and that the sum of $7,000.00 be 
raised and appropriated for purpose of making required 
payments in 1972 under this agreement: 

AGREEMENT AND COVENANT RESPECTING 
LAND IN POSSIBLE RESERVOIR AREA 



1. The Town of Ipswich will forego taking land of 
the undersigned grantor, Ms heirs or assigns by 
eminent domain for the period of one (1) year for 
purposes of improving the water supply of the town. 

2. For and during the term of one year until the 
next annual town meeting the undersigned landowner, 
his heirs or assigns agree not to develop or sub-divide 
the specified property. 

3. This agreement may be renewed by the Town 
Manager with the approval of the Selectmen for any 
year or term of years annually as of the date of the 
Annual Town Meeting up to and including March 1, 
1980. 

4. The Town agrees to pay each year to the land 
owner, his heirs or assigns signatory hereto an amount 
equal to the tax assessed each year for the land 
involved. This provision is applicable only to the land 
affected by this agreement. 

5. The land involved is described on "Compiled 
Plan of Land in Ipswich Prepared for the Town of 
Ipswich, Showing Proposed Takings for Kimball Brook 
Reservoir, Scale 1" - 200', February 18, 1972, hssex 
Survey Service Inc., 47 Federal Street, Salem," to be 
recorded herewith. 



Town Manager 



Owner 



Mr. Ray Courage then moved the question. The 
Moderator stated that a vote would be taken on 
whether the voters wanted the substitute motion 
before them. The substitute motion was lost by a 
hand count with 27°- voting in the affirmative, 305 
opposed. 

The question was then moved on the original 
article. A two-thirds vote is necessary and so stated by 
the Moderator. The motion was lost by a hand count 
with 336 voting in the affirmative, 287 opposed. 

Article 25: To see if the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing a Fire Ladder Truck for use principally by 
the Fire Department. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous Voice 
Vote. 

Article 26: To see what action the Town will take 
to acquire by eminent domain, purchase or otherwise 
the parcel of land owned by the H & H Realty Trust 
in the Dow Reservoir Watershed amounting to 
approximately 65 acres and to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor. 

Moved by Mrs. Sally Weatherall that the town will 
authorize the Selectmen to raise and appropriate 
$34,500 to acquire by purchase or otherwise under 
Chapter 40 Section 8C for conservation purposes in 
behalf of the Conservation Commission; a certain 
parcel of land situated on the westerly side of High 
Street in said Ipswich and bounded and described as 
follows, to wit: Beginning at Massachusetts Highway 
concrete bound on the westerly side of High Street; 
thence running south 28 degrees 34 minutes 40 
seconds east by the westerly side of High Street a 



12 



distance of 43.05 feet to a point which is the 
beginning of a curve of a proposed 30 foot wide 
access way into the property; thence running 
northwesterly, westerly and southwesterly by land of 
the H. & H. Realty Trust by a curve having a radius 
of 30.00 feet a distance of 47.80 feet to a point; 
thence running south 60 degrees 8 minutes seconds 
west by said land of H. & H. Realty Trust being the 
southerly side of said access way a distance of 446.88 
feet to a point; thence running south 29 degrees 52 
minutes seconds east by said land of H. & H. 
Realty Trust, a distance of 326.19 feet to a point; 
thence running south 43 degrees 34 minutes 30 
seconds east by said land of H. & H. Realty Trust a 
distance of 550.79 feet to the stone wall and land of 
William J. and Eleanor M. Heil; thence running 
southwesterly by said land of William J. & Eleanor M. 
Heil a distance of 99.65 feet to land of the Town of 
Ipswich known as Dow's Brook Reservoir; thence 
running northwesterly by said land of the Town of 
Ipswich a distance of 348.81 feet to a point; thence 
running northwesterly almost westerly still by said land 
of the Town of Ipswich a distance of 495 feet, more 
or less, to a point; thence running southeasterly still 
by said land of the Town of Ipswich a distance of 
930 feet, more or less, to a stone wall and land of 
Irwin H. & Alice I. Wass; thence running southwesterly 
by said land of Irwin H. & Alice I. Wass and by land 
of John P. & Carol Flynn a distance of 805 feet, 
more or less, to an angle point; thence continuing 
southwesterly, but more southerly, by said land of 
John P. & Carol Flynn a distance of 615 feet, more 
or less, to land of the Town of Ipswich; thence 
running northwesterly by said land of the Town of 
Ipswich a distance of 850 feet, more or less, to a 
point; thence running southwesterly still by said land 
of the Town of Ipswich a distance of 620 feet, more or less, 
to land of Everett D. & Edna Jewett; thence running 
northwesterly by said land of Everett D. & Edna Jewett a 

distance of 150 feet, more or less to an angle point; 



thence continuing northwesterly but more westerly still 
by land of Everett D. & Edna Jewett a distance of 
130 feet, more or less, to an angle point; thence 
continuing northwesterly but more northerly still by 
land of Everett D. & Edna Jewett a distance of 585 
feet, more or less, to a point and land of Lionel H. 
Sheppard and John B. Perley; thence running 
northeasterly by said land of Lionel H. Sheppard and 
John B. Perley and by land of Guy R. Hickens Jr. a 
distance of 1,010 feet, more or less, to an angle 
point; thence continuing northeasterly but more 
easterly by land of Lionel H. Sheppard and John B. 
Perley a distance of 185 feet, more or less to a 
corner of the stone wall; thence running northwesterly, 
by the stone wall, by said land of Lionel H. Sheppard 
and John B. Perley a distance of 141.17 feet to a 
corner of the stone wall and land of Nancy L. White; 
thence running northeasterly by said land of Nancy L. 
White a distance of 1,218 feet, more or less, to a 
corner of the stone wall and land of Robert and Mary 
L. Colter; thence running northeasterly by the stone 
wall by said land of Robert and Mary L. Colter a 
distance of 227 feet, more or less to a point and land 
of H. & H. Realty Trust; thence running south 27 
degrees 35 minutes 20 seconds east by said land of H. 
& H. Realty Trust a distance of 452.15 feet to an 
angle point, said point being on the northerly side of 
the proposed 30 feet wide access way into the 
property; thence running north 60 degrees 8 minutes 
seconds east by said northerly side of the proposed 
access way being land of H. & H. Realty Trust a 
distance of 400.64 feet to a point which is the 
beginning of a curve; thence running northeasterly, 
northerly and northwesterly by a curve having a radius 
of 30.00 feet by land of H. & H. Realty Trust a 
distance of 42.04 feet to the westerly side of High 
Street; thence running south 20 degrees 10 minutes 20 
seconds east by the westerly side of High Street a 
distance of 43.18 feet to the Mass. Highway concrete 
bound and the point of beginning. Said parcel contains 
69 acres, more or less. 



* 



* 



1972 Town Meeting - In Progress 



(Ipswich Chronicle) 




13 



Said above described parcel of land is shown on a 
plan entitled "Plan Showing Land to be acquired by 
the Town of Ipswich from H. & H. Realty Trust, 
Ipswich, Mass.; February 1972, Scale 1 inch equals 
100 feet, Chester J. Patch Associates, Inc., Ipswich, 
Mass." 

Said above described parcel of land is subject to an 
easement recorded in Essex Registry of Deeds South 
District Book 5268 Page 185 for the construction and 
maintenance of utility lines. 

The Conservation Commission is to be authorized to 
enter into such agreements as may be necessary for 
the purposes of this article; and that the land is to be 
managed and under the control of the Conservation 
Commission. Seconded. 

Mr. Charles Dal ton stated that the Finance 
Committee recommends this article with 8 voting in 
the affirmative, 1 abstention. The Board of Selectmen 
and Planning Board also recommend this article. Mr. 
George Pacheco announced that Ipswich Environmental 
Quality also supports this article. Motion carried by 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 



Article 27: To see if the town will accept and 
adopt the amendment to the Agreement establishing 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District which was initiated by the Regional District 
School Committee on January 12, 1972 and which 
provides for the admission of the Town of Merrimac 
as a member of the district, or take any other action 
in relation thereto. 

Mr. Robert Weatherall moved that the town vote to 
accept and adopt the amendment to the Agreement 
establishing the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District, initiated by the regional district 
school committee on January 12, 1972, and which 
provides for the admission of the Town of Merrimac 
as a member, said amendment to consist of the 
following new Section XIV: 

SECTION XIV: 
Admission of the Town of Merrimac to Membership in 
the District. 

A) Upon the effective date of this Section, the Town 
of Merrimac shall become a member of the 
District. 

B) Promptly after this Section takes effect, the school 
committee of the Town of Merrimac shall appoint 
a member to the Committee to serve until March 
31, 1975. Successors to such member shall be 
appointed in accordance with Section I. 

C) The Town of Merrimac shall pay the sum of 
$39,818.38 as its share of debt service and 
operating costs for the period 1968 through 1972. 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Motion 
carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 28: To see if the town will accept and 
adopt the amendment to the Agreement establishing 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District which was initiated by the Regional District 
School Committee on January 12, 1972 and which 
provides for the appointment of an additional district 
school committee member from the City of Haverhill 



to the Regional District School Committee, or take 
any other action in relation thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Weatherall that the town vote to 
accept and adopt the amendment to the Agreement 
establishing the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District, initiated by the regional district 
school committee on January 12, 1972, and which 
provides for the appointment of an additional district 
school committee member from the City of Haverhill, 
said amendment to consist of the following new 
Section XV: 

SECTION XV: 
Appointment of an additional district school committee 
member from the City of Haverhill. 

A) Upon the effective date of this Section, the school 
committee of the City of Haverhill shall appoint 
an additional member to the committee to serve 
until March 31, 1974. Successors to such member 
shall be appointed in accordance with Section I 
for a term of three years. 

B) The district agreement shall be amended to read as 
follows: 

SECTION I - The Regional District School 
Committee 

"(A) Composition - The regional district school 
committee hereinafter referred to as the 
Committee, shall consist of three members from 
the City of Haverhill and two members from the 
City of Newburyport and one member from each 
of the following towns which accept Chapter 156 
of the Acts of 1967:" Seconded. 

Mr. Weatherall stated that he opposed this article. 
Finance Committee also opposes this article. Motion 
defeated by Voice Vote. 

Article 29: Establishing a Professional Assistance 
Program for the Cities and Towns of Essex County - 
Be it enacted by the Town of Ipswich that a sum of 
$11,000 be appropriated to the New Meadows 
Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization of 
professionals under the laws of Massachusetts, located 
at 9 East Common, Topsfield, Mass. for a pilot 
conservation project involving the cities and towns of 
Essex County to dispose of solid waste: Paper, glass, 
metals, plastics, etc. will be directly recycled and the 
remaining biodegradable solid waste including leaves, 
clippings, and pumpings from cesspools will be 
converted to a superior plant food or compost by the 
use of earthworms. 

Following the completion of the pilot project, a 
plant at the town dump will be proposed that will 
recycle all the solid wastes. 

Compost and earthworms are needed to rehabilitate 
impoverished town soils and to improve town lands in 
the productivity of plants and wild animals. 
(Sponsored by New Meadows Foundation, Inc., 
Topsfield, Mass. - Ten-Taxpayers' Petition) 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous Voice 
Vote. 

Article 30: To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Chapter III of the By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich 
by repealing Sections 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8 thereof and 



14 



adopting in place thereof Sections 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8 
as follows: 

Section 1 - The annual town meeting of the town 
shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on the first Monday in 
March and all business except the election of such 
officers and the determination of such matters as by 
law or by this chapter are required to be elected or 
determined by ballot, shall be considered at that 
meeting or at an adjournment thereof to another day. 
That part of the annual meeting devoted to the 
election of officers and the determination of such 
questions as by law or by this chapter are required to 
be elected or determined by ballot shall be held on 
the second Monday of March in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 8. The hours during which the 
polls shall be kept open for such balloting may be 
designated by the meeting subject to the provisions of 
section 64, Chapter 54 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. 

Section 2 — All warrants for town meetings, except 
notices of adjournment, shall be served by posting 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and at each 
of the meeting houses in the town, and by 
publication, seven days at least prior to the time for 
holding said meeting, in a newspaper published in, or 
having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Section 3 — No special town meeting shall be 
called to assemble earlier than 7:30 p.m. The balloting 
on all appropriations arising at a special town meeting, 
the adoption of which is required by the provisions 
of Section 8 of this chapter to be by printed ballot, 
shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 8 not less than seven nor more than 
fourteen days after sad meeting, and said meeting shall 
adjourn to such date as is determined for the purpose 
of balloting. The hours during which the polls shall be 
kept open for such balloting may be designated by 
the meeting. 

Section 4 — No Change. 

Section 5 — No Change. 

Section 6 — The presence of five percent of the 
registered voters of the town at a town meeting shall 
be required to constitute a quorum, except for a 
motion to adjourn for which no quorum shall be 
required; provided however that no vote carrying the 
expenditure or appropriation of any sum of money 
shall be held to be invalid by reason of lack of the 
required quorum, unless it appears from the records of 
the town clerk that before the result of such vote was 
declared the question of the presence of a quorum 
was duly raised and that such record shows that the 
required quorum was lacking. This section shall not 
apply to those parts of meetings devoted exclusively 
to the election of town officers or balloting with 
respect to any appropriation of money as required by 
Section 8 of this chapter. 

Section 7 — All adjournments of a special town 
meeting and the annual town meeting except for 
balloting by printed ballot in accordance with the 
provisions of this chapter shall be called to assemble 
not earlier than 7:30 p.m. 

Section 8 — No appropriation to be raised by 
bonds of the Town of Ipswich, except for (a) an 



appropriation for a revenue producing department, (b) 
an appropriation less than five hundred thousand 
dollars for a school or schools or for a sewer, 
sewers, or sewer installations, (c) an appropriation less 
than fifty thousand dollars for any other purpose, 
shall be valid unless the article and motion calling for 
such appropriation shall be adopted by a vote on a 
printed ballot after there has been full opportunity 
for debate. All other motions pertaining to such an 
appropriation, except that calling for adoption may be 
disposed of without reference to a printed ballot. 
Subject to the provisions of Section 1 and Section 3 
of these by-laws, the time and place for balloting on 
such appropriations shall be determined by the 
meeting, which when it does adjourn, shall adjourn to 
such time and place as is determined for the purpose 
of balloting only. The printed ballots shall be prepared 
by the moderator and town clerk in such form as 
they shall determine and in a manner to enable voters 
to vote "yes" or "no" on the appropriation. The 
tellers and other officers required for the balloting on 
such appropriation shall be appointed by the 
Selectmen. 

Moved by Mr. Dale Vincent to amend Chapter HI 
of the by-laws of the Town of Ipswich by repealing 
Sections 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 thereof and adopting in 
place thereof Sections 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 as follows: 

Section 1 — The annual town meeting of the town 
shall be held at 7:30 p.m. on the first Monday in 
March and all business except the election of such 
officers and the determination of such matters as by 
law or by this chapter are required to be elected or 
determined by ballot, shall be considered at that 
meeting or at an adjournment thereof to another day. 
That part of the annual meeting devoted to the 
election of officers and the determination of such 
questions as by law or by this chapter are required to 
be elected or determined by ballot shall be held on 
the second Monday of March in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 8. The hours during which the 
polls shall be kept open for such balloting may be 
designated by the meeting subject to the provisions of 
section 64, Chapter 54 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. 

Section 2 — All warrants for town meetings, except 
notices of adjournment, shall be served by posting 
attested copies thereof at the Post Office and at each 
of the meeting houses in the town, and by 
publication, seven days at least prior to the time for 
holding said meeting, in a newspaper published in, or 
having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Section 3 — No special town meeting shall be 
called to assemble earlier than 7:30 p.m. The balloting 
on all appropriations arising at a special town meeting, 
the adoption of which is required by the provisions of 
Section 8 of this chapter to be by printed ballot, 
shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 8 not less than seven nor more than 
fourteen days after said meeting, and said meeting 
shall adjourn to such date as is determined for the 
purpose of balloting. The hours during which the polls 
shall be kept open for such balloting may be 
designated by the meeting. 

Section 4 — No change. 

Section 5 — No change. 



15 



Section 6 — The presence of five per cent of the 
registered voters of the town at a town meeting shall 
be required to constitute a quorum, except for a 
motion to adjourn for which no quorum shall be 
required; provided however that no vote carrying the 
expenditure or appropriation of any sum of money 
shall be held to be invalid by reason of lack of the 
required quorum, unless it appears from the records of 
the town clerk that before the result of such vote was 
declared the question of the presence of a quorum 
was duly raised and that such record shows that the 
required quorum was lacking. This section shall not 
apply to those parts of meetings devoted exclusively 
to the election of town officers or balloting with 
respect to any appropriation of money as required by 
Section 8 of this chapter. 

Section 7 — All adjournments of a special town 
meeting and the annual town meeting except for 
balloting by printed ballot in accordance with the 
provisions of this chapter shall be called to assemble 
not earlier than 7:30 p.m. 

Section 8 No appropriation to be raised by 

donds of the Town of Ipswich, except for (a) an 
appropriation for a revenue producing department, (b) 
an appropriation less than five hundred thousand 
dollars for a school or schools or for a sewer, sewers, 
or sewer installations, (c) an appropriation less than 
fifty thousand dollars for any other purpose, shall be 
valid unless the article and motion calling for such 
appropriation shall be adopted by a vote on a printed 
ballot after there has been full opportunity for debate. 
All other motions pertaining to such an appropriation, 
except that calling for adoption may be disposed ot 
without reference to a printed ballot. Subject to the 
provisions of Section 1 and Section 3 of these 
by-laws, the time and place for balloting on such 
appropriations shall be determined by the meeting, 
which when it does adjourn, shall adjourn to such 
time and place as is determined for the purpose of 
balloting only. The printed ballots shall be prepared 
by the moderator and town clerk in such form as 
they shall determine and in a manner to enable voters 
to vote "yes" or "no" on the appropriation. The 
tellers and other officers required for the balloting on 
such appropriation shall be appointed by the 
Selectmen. Seconded. 

Mr. Vincent explained that this notice would serve 
to make the by-laws more coherent. Finance 
Committee recommends this article. Motion carried by 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 31: To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Chapter 18 of the Town By-laws by adding the 
following section to said Chapter: 

Section 47. Regulation of Public Use of 
Sound-Amplifying Equipment. 

No person shall operate or cause to be operated 
any loudspeaker, sound truck, public address system, 
or other device or equipment for broadcasting or 
amplifying sound: (a) within one hundred (100) feet 
of any dwelling, hospital, nursing home, church, 
school, library, court house, or park; or (b) in any 
public place in such a manner as (1) to obstruct the 
orderly movement of traffic or divert the attention of 
persons using public streets or ways from the exercise 



of care required for the safety of themselves or 
others; or (2) to cause loud and raucous noise of 
sufficient volume to be distinctly audible at a distance 
of three hundred (300) feet; or (3) to register eighty 
(80) decibels or more at a distance of one hundred 
(100) feet, from any loudspeaker used. 

Moved by Mr. Cobb to amend Chapter 18 of the 
Town By-Laws by adding the following section to said 
Chapter: 

Regulation of Public Use of Sound-Amplifying 
Equipment 

No person shall operate or cause to be operated 
any loud speaker, sound truck, public address system, 
or other device or equipment for broadcasting or 
amplifying sound: (a) within one hundred (100) feet 
of any dwelling, hospital, nursing home, church, 
school, library, court house, or park; or (b) in any 
public place in such manner as (1) to obstruct the 
orderly movement of traffic or divert the attention of 
persons using public streets or ways from the exercise 
of care required for the safety of themselves or 
others; or (2) to cause loud and raucous noise of 
sufficient volume to be distinctly audible at a distance 
of three hundred (300) feet; or (3) to register eighty 
(80) decibels or more at a distance of one hundred 
(100)' feet, from any loudspeaker used. Seconded. Mr. 
Cobb spoke on the article stating that the Police 
Department has said that the decible limitation is 
unenforceable, finance Committee unanimously opposes 
the article. Mr. William Markos moved for indefinite 
postponement and Mr. Mitchell Kozazcki spoke in 
favor of indefinitely postponing this article. Seconded. 
Motion for indefinite postponement carried by majority 
Voice Vote. 

Article 32: To see if the Town Meeting will adopt 
an order under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
43B„ Section 10A, proposing the following amendment 
to the Town Charter subject to the approval of the 
Attorney General pursuant to Section 10C, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, Section 11, 
at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to balloting in 1973: To see if the town will 
vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620, Acts 
of 1966) by amending Section 22 of the Charter 
entitled "Electric Light Department" as follows: by 
striking out the words "to whom the Board of 
Selectmen shall delegate its duties and responsibilities 
as electric light commissioners" and inserting the words 
"who shall be responsible to the Board of Selectmen 
as electric light commissioners." 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the town adopt an 
order under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43 
B, Section 10A, proposing the following amendment to 
the Town Charter subject to the approval of the 
Attorney General pursuant to Section 10C, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, Section 11, 
at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to balloting in 1973: To see if the town will 
vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620, Acts 
of 1966) by amending Section 22 of the Charter 
entitled "Electric Light Department" as follows: by 
striking out the words "to whom the Board of 
Selectmen shall delegate its duties and responsibilities 
as electric light commissioners" and inserting the words 



16 



"who shall be responsible to the Board of Selectmen 
as electric light commissioners". Seconded. Finance 
Committee recommends. Two-thirds vote required and 
so stated by the Moderator. Motion carried by 
Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 33: To see if the Town Meeting will adopt 
an order under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
43B, Section 10A, proposing the following amendment 
to the Town Charter subject to the approval of; the 
Attorney General pursuant to Section IOC, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, Section 11, 
at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to balloting in 1973; To see if the town will 
vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620, Acts 
of 1966); by amending Section 21 of the Charter 
entitled "Department of Public Works" as follows: by 
deleting the words "water commissioners, sewer 
commissioners" from the second sentence of said 
section and adding the following sentence: "The Board 
of Selectmen shall assume all the powers and duties 
heretofore delegated to the Water Commissioners and 
Sewer Commissioners." and by striking the word "he" 
at the beginning of the third sentence of said section 
and replacing it by the words "the town manager". 

Moved by Mr. Bialek that the town adopt an order 
under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, 
Section 10A, proposing the following amendment to 
the Town Charter subject to the approval of the 
Attorney General pursuant to Section IOC, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, Section 11, 
at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to balloting in 1973: To see if the town will 
vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620, Acts 
of 1966) by amending Section 21 of the Charter 
entitled "Department of Public Works" as follows: by 
deleting the words "water commissioners, sewer 
commissioners" from the second sentence of said 
section and adding the following sentence: "The Board 
of Selectmen shall assume all the powers and duties 
heretofore delegated to the Water Commissioners and 
Sewer Commissioners." and by striking the word "he" 
at the beginning of the third sentence of said section 
and replacing it by the words "The town manager". 
Seconded. Finance Committee recommends. Motion 
carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 34: To see if the Town Meeting will adopt 
an order under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
43B, Section 10A, proposing the following amendment 
to the Town Charter subject to the approval of the 
Attorney General pursuant to Section IOC, to be 
submitted to the voters in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 43B, Section 11, 
at that part of the next Annual Town Meeting 
devoted to balloting in 1973: To see if the Town will 
vote to amend the Town Charter (Chapter 620, Acts 
of 1966); by amending Section 13 of the Town 
Charter entitled "Boards and Offices to be Appointed 
by the Town Manager" by adding the following 
sentence at the end thereof: "The Planning Board shall 
consist of seven (7) members whose appointment by 
the town manager shall be subject to the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen." 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that this article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. The Planning Board 



and Finance Committee recommend indefinite 
postponement. Motion for indefinite postponement 
carried by Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 35: To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following by-law: 

No person owning, harboring or having custody and 
control of a dog shall permit such dog to be at large 
in the Town of Ipswich elsewhere than on the 
premises of the owner, except it be on the premises 
of another person with the knowledge and assent of 
such other person. Any dog elsewhere shall from 7:00 
AJV1. to 10:00 P.M. be controlled or restrained by any 
chain or leash and from 10:00 ?M. to 7:00 A.M. 
shall at all times be under the direct control and 
supervision of its owner, or his designee. No person 
owning, harboring, or having custody and control of a 
dog shall suffer, permit or allow such a dog to 
commit any nuisance in any park, playground, beach, 
public common or municipal recreation area or upon 
any sidewalk in the Town of Ipswich. Disposition of 
complaints or violation of this by-law will be in 
accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 140- 
Section 173-A, to wit: 

The Clerk of the District ourt shall send a notice 
to the person complained against, and that if such 
person confesses his offense either in person or by 
mail, the charge will be dismissed on the first offense, 
and there is a fine of $2.00 for the second offense; 
$5.00 for the third offense, $10.00 for the fourth and 
subsequent offenses. (Ten Taxpayer's Petition) 

Moved by Mr. John Logan to see if the Town will 
vote to adopt the following By-law: 

No person owning, harboring or having custody and 
control of a dog shall permit such dog to be at large 
in the Town of Ipswich elsewhere than on the 
premises of the owner, except it be on the premises 
of another person with the knowledge and assent of 
such other person. Any dog elsewhere shall from 7:00 
A.M. to 10:00 P.M. be controlled or restrained by any 
chain or leash from 10:00 PJV1. to 7:00 A.M. shall at 
all times be under the direct control and supervision 
of its owner, or his designee. No person owning, 
harboring, or having custody and control of a dog 
shall suffer, permit or allow such a dog to commit 
any nuisance in any park, playground, beach, public 
common or municipal recreation area or upon any 
sidewalk in the Town of Ipswich. Disposition of 
complaints or violation of the by-law will be in 
accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 140, 
Section 173-A, to wit: 

The Clerk of the District Court shall send a notice 
to the person complained against, and that if such 
person confesses his offense either in person or by 
mail, the charge will be dismissed on the first offense, 
and there is a fine of $2.00 for the second offense; 
$5.00 for the third offense, $10.00 for the fourth and 
subsequent offenses. Seconded. 

Mr. Logan, along with Mrs. Lee McKay-Smith and 
Mr. Fred Hines spoke in favor of this motion. Mr. Bill 
Clapp spoke in favor of indefinitely postponing the 
article. Town Manager Conti stated that the Police 
Department felt this article would be unenforceable. 
Mr. Markos stated that the Finance Committee opposes 



17 



this motion, and he moved for indefinite 
postponement. Seconded. The motion for indefinite 
postponement carried with 170 voting in the 
affirmative, 169 opposed. 

A motion was made and seconded that the Meeting 
be dissolved. Carried by Voice Vote. The Moderator 
declared the Meeting dissolved at 11:58 p.m. 

ATTEST 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 

BALLOTING DAY 
MONDAY, MARCH 13, 1972 

ARTICLE 1 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

The ballots were prepared by the Moderator and 
Town Clerk in accordance with the Town By-Laws. 

The result of the ballot vote was as follows: 



Yes 


2,312 


No 


885 


Blank 


86 




3,283 



A 2/3 vote or 2,142 was required. The motion 
carried 

ATTEST 

Harold G. Comeau 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

Essex ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on 
MONDAY, THE TENTH DAY OF JULY, 1972 at 7:30 
o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the 
following articles, viz: 

Moderator Harry Munro called the meeting to order at 
7:30 p.m. He announced that the quorum needed was 
320, and 333 voters were present. A final count showed 
655 voters were in attendance. 

The following tellers were appointed by the 
Moderator : Robert H. Leet, George Bruce, William 
Matous, Theodore C. Parady, and John P. Dziadose. 

A Salute to the Flag was led by Town Clerk Harold G. 
Comeau. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silent prayer as 
the invocation. 



Moved by Mr. Joseph Navarro that the assembled body 
stand in a moment of silence for the late Fire Chief 
Russell Scahill. 

Town Clerk Harold Comeau read the opening and 
closing paragraphs of the Warrant and the Constable's 
Return. 

Article 1 : To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing a Fire Ladder Truck, and to determine 
whether such appropriation shall be raised by borrowing 
or otherwise or take any other action with respect 
thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Paul Gillespie that the Town appropriate 
$80,000 for the purpose of purchasing a fire ladder 
truck and that to raise this appropriation the sum of 
$20,000 be transferred from Free Cash, and that the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
be authorized to issue $60,000 of bonds or notes of the 
town under General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (9), and 
that the disposition of this question be determined by 
ballot in accordance with Chapter 3 of the Town By-Laws 
at an adjourned session of this meeting to be held for the 
purpose of balloting only at Winthrop School between 
hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. on July 18, 1972. 
Seconded. 

Mr. Gillespie supplied voters with some background on 
the article and gave reasons why it was important to 
replace the existing fire truck. He stated that the truck 
was dangerously old, and recent repairs to the hydraulic 
system could not be guaranteed to last indefinitely. Mr. 
Gillespie further explained that there was an increase of 
$5,000 to the original price to allow for certain options 
to be installed when the order is filled. The increase also 
allowed for any increase in cost; but if not needed, the 
amount would be returned to the general fund. 

Finance Committee recommends. Board of Selectmen 
recommends. Unanimous voice vote. Motion carried. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for necessary repair projects in connection with 
the storm disaster of 1972 and to see if the town will 
authorize the treasurer to borrow such sum under the 
provisions of Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1945, or take any 
action in relation thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Navarro that the Town appropriate the 
sum of $ 1 1 ,500 for necessary repair projects in 
connection with the storm disaster of 1972 and to meet 
said appropriation the Treasurer is hereby authorized to 
borrow, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, the 
sum of $ 1 1 ,500 under the provisions of Chapter 74 of the 
Acts of 1945 provided that such borrowing shall be 
reduced by the amount of any Federal or State grants 
available therefor and that the Town Manager be 
authorized to apply for State or Federal assistance. 
Seconded. 

Mr. Navarro briefly explained this article and listed the 
affected areas. Finance Committee recommends. The 
Moderator reminded voters that a two-thirds vote was 
necessary to pass this article. The motion was carried by 
ahand count with 475 voting in the affirmative, 4 
opposed. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will vote to rescind 



18 



Section 8 of Chapter III of the Town by-laws pertaining 
to appropriations raised by bonds. 

Moved by Mr. Weatherall that Section 8 of Chapter III 
of the Town By-Laws pertaining to appropriations raised 
by bonds be rescinded. Seconded. 

The Moderator advised voters that on the advice of 
Town Counsel there would be no amendments or 
re-counts allowed on this ARticle. Mr. Weatherall 
discussed the history of the existing by-law and gave his 
reasons for requesting the rescission of same. Mr. Navarro 
stated that a final vote of the Board of Selectmen was 
not taken because two voted in favor, two in opposition, 
and the fifth member was away on vacation. 

Mr. Irving Small, Government Study Committee, 
reported that a vote of five opposed to three in favor was 
submitted by his committee to the Board of Selectmen 
on July 5 . 

Mr. Bill Markos reported that the Finance Committee 
was opposed to this article voting five to two. He also 
suggested that if this article were given adequate study 
and presented properly, the town might approve. 

Mr. Robert Bamford gave his reasons for being 
opposed to the article, claiming that the present by-law 
provided an equal opportunity to vote. 

Mr. Roger Burke, Finance Committee, spoke in favor 
of the article, stating that it provided positive action 
when it is important. Mr. Paul Gahm, School Committee, 
also spoke in favor of this article. 

Reasons for being opposed to this article were also 
given by Mr. Ed Damon, School Committee. 

At this point, Mr. Klos moved the question. Seconded. 
Mr. Fred Paulitz objected, and the Moderator called for a 
vote on whether or not to move the question. The 
motion carried with 454 voting in favor, 91 opposed. 

The Moderator then announced that all debate would 
stop, and the original motion was repeated. Article 3 was 
defeated with 147 voting in favor, 479 opposed. 

Mr. Navarro moved that the meeting be dissolved. 
Seconded and carried by unanimous voice vote. The 
Moderator declared the meeting dissolved at 8:45 p.m. 

ATTEST 

HAROLD G. COMEAU 
Town Clerk 

Balloting Day Tuesday, July 18, 1972 

ARTICLE 1 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

The ballots were prepared by the Moderator and Town 
Clerk in accordance with the Town By-Laws. 

The result of the ballot vote was as follows: 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



Yes 

No 

Total 



496 

99 

595 



A 2/3 vote or 397 was required. The motion carried. 

ATTEST 

HAROLD G. COMEAU 
Town Clerk 



Essex, ss. 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said 
County. 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL in said Ipswich on 
TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-FOURTH DAY OF 
OCTOBER, 1972 at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and 
there to act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator Harry Munro called the meeting to order at 
7:30 p.m. He announced that the quorum heeded was 
351, and 274 voters were present. Mr. Joseph Navarro 
moved that the meeting be delayed for an additional five 
minutes pending a quorum. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. At 7:35 the Moderator reopened the meeting 
announcing that there were now 412 voters present. A 
final count showed 717 voters in attendance. 

The Moderator announced that sophomore and junior 
students from the high school had been appointed tellers 
and would be working under the supervision of Police 
Chief Armand Brouillette. White cards would be raised 
when voting. These cards were issued when voters were 
checked off when entering the meeting. 

A Salute to the flag was led by Town Clerk Harold G. 
Comeau. 

Invocation was given by Rev. Robert Dobson, 
Congregational minister, in honor of Charles Goodhue 
who died the day of this meeting. 

Town Clerk Harold Comeau read the opening and 
closing paragraphs of the Warrant and the Constable's 
Return. 

Mr. William Thoen, Chairman of the Planning Board, 
moved that three men representing Radice Corporation, 
developer of proposed PCD, and one planning consultant 
working on the Town's Master Plan be admitted to the 
Special Town Meeting without the privilege of voting or 
speaking. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 

Article 1 : To see if the Town will amend the "Zoning 
District Map of the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts," 
dated September 1957, as amended and -or revised to 
date, or to take any other action with respect thereto, by 
changing from Planned Community District (PCD) to 
Rural Residential Agricultural District (RRA) certain 
premises now or formerly owned in common by Ipswich 
Fairways, Inc., and Country Club of Ipswich, Inc., 
comprising approximately 340 acres of land. 

Moved by Mrs. Lorna Antkowiak to amend the 
"Zoning District Map of the Town of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts" dated September 1957 as amended or 
revised to date, by changing from Planned Community 
Development District (PCD) to Rural Residential and 
Agricultural District (RRA), that area of the Town of 
Ipswich lying northerly of Linebrook Road, said area 
being bounded and defined as follows: Beginning at a 
point on the Ipswich-Rowley town line, approximately 
500 feet east of Newburyport Turnpike, thence easterly 
along the town boundary line 3,407 feet plus or minus: 



19 



thence generally southerly, easterly, southerly, easterly, 
southerly, westerly and southerly along an irregular line 
which hue is also the boundary of properties, now or 
formerly of Palmer S. Perley, et al, Wilbert A. Bishop, 
Edward J. Smolenski, Albert W. Chapman, et al, and 
Edward J. Smolenski, a total distance of 6,487 feet, more 
or less, thence westerly 2,558 feet more or less, along the 
property now or formerly of Antonia Galicki et al; thence 
northwesterly 1 ,432 feet more or less along the property 
now or formerly of Tina lori et al: thence westerly 997 
feet more or less to the rear of property lines fronting on 
Edge Street, so-called; thence generally northerly and 
easterly along land formerly of Whitten Bros., Inc. now or 
formerly of Campanelli, Inc.; thence generally westerly 
along the rear of lot lines 235, 234, 233,232,231,230, 
229, 227, and 228, and side lot line of lot 25 as shown 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Willowdale Acres, Single 
Residence Development, Ipswich, Mass. by Raymond C. 
Pressey, Engrs., dated October 29, 1956" and recorded in 
Essex South District Registry of Deeds: thence northerly 
444 feet, more or less, westerly 637 feet, more or less, 
and northerly 1580 feet, more or less, along the properties 
now or formerly of Mildred C. Crocker, to the point of 
beginning. Seconded. 

Mr. Cornelius Cleary asked for a yes vote on this 
article stating that it did not relate to PCD as a zoning 
concept but asks to change this specific piece of property 
to RRA. Mr. William Thoen stated that the Planning 
Board did not recommend this article, and the Planning 
Board thought the present PCD developer would not go 
away even if this article were passed. 

Finance Committee does not recommend this article, 
and the Board of Selectmen voted against 
recommendation of this article. Mrs. Sally Weathcrall, 

Chairman of Conservation Commission, stated that they 
did not take a vote, but that her committee was 
concerned about water and density of the PCD. Mrs. M. 
L. Scudder, Chairman of the School Committee, urged 
the Planning Board to support this article. 

Mr. Charles Rose requested the vote of the Selectmen 
and Finance Committee. Mr. Navarro stated that 
Selectmen Navarro, Cole, and Cobb voted to oppose and 
Selectmen Kozeneski and Gillespie voted to support this 
article. The Finance Committee voted unanimously to 
oppose. 

Mr. Ed Michon stated that he was in favor of the 
article and opposed to PCD and its effect on the school 
system. Town Counsel Dale Vincent said the only effect 
an affirmative vote would have would be to accelerate the 
building. He further stated that he was aware of no 
damage to the water shed as yet. Mr. Bill Markos, Finance 
Committee, spoke opposing the article. He said the PCD 
economically makes good sense, but the zoning by-law 
(concerning PCD) is not as good as it should be. 

Mr. Charles Shultz asked the Planning Board questions 
on building permits and cesspools if the area is reverted 
back to RRA. Mr. Jason Sokolov answered yes, the 
building inspector would either issue or withhold a 
building permit for each house; and Mr. Thoen answered 
yes, each house would have its own cesspool if the area 
were reverted back to RRA and one-acre zoning. 

Town Manager Richard Conti, in answer to Mr. Brad 
Lucas' question about the "Coca Cola" water, stated that 



the colored water could not be attributed to the PCD. 
This problem is caused by old water pipes and activity in 
building sewers. Mr. Charles Rose ^discussed a sewerage 
problem if the PCD is completed. 

After a recount taken by Police Chief Brouillette and 
Town Clerk Comeau, the article was defeated with 468 
voting in the affirmative, 241 opposing. A two-thirds 
vote, or 472, was needed to pass the article. Motion 
defeated. Mrs. Mariet Moffatt asked to be put on record 
as challenging the vote. 

Article 2: To see if the Town will amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law, Town of Ipswich, 1970 
(adopted by vote of Town Meeting, March 1, 1970; 
approved May 18, 1970; published June 1, 1970), as 
amended to date, or, take any other action with respect 
thereto, by deleting therefrom any and all references to 
Planning Community Development District(s) and to 
language variations and abbreviations having the same or 
similar meaning, and all language defining the nature and 
use(s) of such District(s). 

Moved by Mr. Robert E. Buttrick that the article be 
indefinitely postponed. Seconded. Unanimous Voice Vote. 
Motion carried. 

Article 3: To see if the Town will amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law, Town of Ipswich, 1970 
(Adopted by vote of Town Meeting, March 1, 1970; 
approved May 18, 1970, and published June 1, 1970) as 
amended to date, or take any other action with respect 
thereto, by changing SECTION V. PERMITTED USES' 
SUB-SECTION H. INDUSTRIAL (I) DISTRICT, 
paragraph 2 thereunder, to read: 

"With the exception of apartments and multi-family 
dwellings any other use permitted by right in a General 
Business (GB) District, subject to connection to the 
municipal sewer system of all buildings to which water is 
supplied." 

Moved by Mr. John Donaldson to amend the 
Protective Zoning By-Law, Town of Ipswich, 1970 
(Adopted by vote of Town Meeting, March 1, 1970: 
approved May 18, 1970 and published June I, 1970) as 
amended to date, or take any other action with respect 
thereto, by changing SECTION V. PERMITTED USES, 
SUBSECTION H. INDUSTRIAL (I) DISTRICT, paragraph 
2 thereunder, to read: 

"With the exception of apartments and multi-family 
dwellings any other use permitted by right in a General 
Business (GB) District, subject to connection to the 
municipal sewer system of all buildings to which water is 
supplied." Seconded. 

Mr. Cornelius Cleary spoke in favor of this article. Mr. 
Thoen stated that the Planning Board did not recommend 
this article, and Mr. David Scudder said that the Finance 
Committee agreed with the Planning Board and 
recommended against this article, adding that this should 
be taken up under the Master Plan. It was stated by Mr. 
Cobb that the Selectmen voted 3 to 2 to oppose this 
zoning change. 

Selectman Kozeneski asked if the Finance Committee 
vote had been unanimous and Mr. Scudder said it had. 
Mr. Bill Markos, Finance Committee, felt that conflict of 
interest was being hinted. He asked voters not to be 



20 



fooled and to vote against this article. Mr. John Bialek, 
former Selectman, then spoke in favor of this article, and 
Mr. John Markos, one of the developers of apartments on 
Topsfield Road, spoke against. 

Mr. Thoen advised voters that the passing of this 
article would not prohibit the Markos development. At 
Mr. Thoen's request, Town Counsel Vincent clarified a 
point on Planning Board approval. He stated that the 
General Laws require the Planning Board to stamp a 
perimeter plan "Planning Board Approval Not Required" 
if that perimeter plan does not show any subdivision and 
if the required frontage is allowed. Mr. Hollie Bucklin 
then warned that the point of the amendment was being 
lost, that it was not personal. And Mr. Bialek, referring to 
Planning Board approval, suggested that there may be too 
much permissiveness. 

The motion was carried with 417 voting in the 
affirmative, 175 in opposition. A two-thirds vote or 394 
was needed. 

Article 4: To see if the town will accept and adopt the 
amendment to the agreement establishing the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District which 
was initiated by the Regional District School Committee 
on September 13, 1972, and which provides for the 
admission of the Town of Merrimac as a member of the 
district, or take any other action in relation thereto. 

Moved by Mr. Robert Weatherall that the Town accept 
and adopt the amendment to the Agreement establishing 
the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District which was initiated by the REgional District 
School Committee on September 13, 1972 and which 
provides for the admission of the Town of Merrimac as a 
member of ihe district. Seconded. Motion carried by 
unanimous voice vote. 

Article 5: To see if the Town will vote to take action 
on the following with respect to the Protective Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich — that Section V, Item 
12, paragraph (g) be modified as follows: To add the 
words skating rink and-or tennis courts after the comma 
following the word "clubhouse". 

Section V, Item 12, paragraph (g) presently reads: 
Recreation facility open to the public or operated by a 
club, limited to a park, golf course, marina, archery or 
target range, yacht club, hunting reserve, provided it shall 
not include any structure other than a clubhouse, 
swimming pool and rest rooms. No structure shall be less 
than three hundred (300) feet from any dwelling. 
Exterior lighting shall be limited to the minimum required 
for safe access and egress. 

Section V, Item 12, paragraph (g) as modified would 
read as follows: 

Recreation facility open to the public or operated by a 
club, limited to a park, golf course, marina, archery or 
target range, yacht club, hunting reserve, provided it shall 
not include any structure other than a clubhouse, skating 
rink and-or tennis courts, swimming pool and rest rooms. 
No structure shall be less than three hundred (300) feet 
from any dwelling. Exterior lighting shall be limited to 
the minimum required for safe access and egress. 

Moved by Mr. Carmen Marciano that Section V, Item 
12, paragraph g. be modified as follows: To add the 
words, indoor or outdoor skating arena and/or indoor or 



outdoor tennis courts after the comma following the 
word clubhouse and before the words swimming pool. 
Section V, Item 12, paragraph g., as modified would read 
as follows: 

g. Recreation facility open to the public or operated 
by a club, limited to a park, golf course, marina, archery 
or target range, yacht club, hunting reserve, provided it 
shall not include any structure other than a clubhouse, 
indoor or outdoor skating -arena and/or indoor or outdoor 
tennis courts, swimming pool and rest rooms. No 
structure shall be less than three hundred (300) feet from 
any dwelling. Exterior lighting shall be limited to the 
minimum required for safe access and egress. Seconded. 

Mr. Marciano spoke briefly in favor ot this article. Mr. 
Prosser gave the Planning Board's reasons for opposing 
this article; and Mr. Markos said the Finance Committee 
appreciated work of the Industrial Commission, but they 
must agree with the Planning Board in opposing this 
article. Mr. Tom Emery said that good land must be made 
available, and Mr. Cobb said the Selectmen agreed but 
they were not convinced that this was the proper way to 
do it at this time. 

Mr. Paul Gahm said he favored an ice rink concept in 
Ipswich, but he thought this article was poorly conceived 
and poorly written, and requested that voters defeat it. 
Mr. Angelo Perna also spoke in opposition of the article 
suggesting that some specific areas ought to be made 
available for consideration. Messrs. John Bialek, Fred 
Paulitz, and James Daly then spoke urging that voters 
vote in favor of this article. 

The motion was defeated with 123 voting in the 
affirmative, 275 in opposition. 

A motion was made and seconded that the Meeting be 
dissolved. Carried by voice vote. The Moderator declared 
the Meeting dissolved at 10:20 p.m. 

ATTEST: 

HAROLD G. COMEAU 
Town Clerk 




21 



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Board of Selectmen /I to r/ Atty. Paul J. Gillespie, Mrs. Elizabeth S. Cole, Mr. Edward Kozeneski, Chairman Joseph A. 
Navarro, Atty. Charles K. Cobb, Jr. (House of Hinlinj 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
Elizabeth S. Cole 
Charles K. Cobb, Jr. 
Paul J. Gillespie 
Edward Kozeneski 

The year 1972 was an eventful one for Ipswich. 
With hard work and diligent effort by the Board of 
Selectmen, the Town Manager, Finance Committee, 
Treasurer and Assessors, we were able to hold the tax 
rate stable. The cooperative attitude that these groups 
display in working together should be and is 
appreciated by the Selectmen. 



Early in the spring we received a most distinguished 
visitor, His Honor William Mulley, Mayor of Ipswich, 
England. He was most impressed with our community 
and by the hospitality afforded him by all who met 
him. 



^^^ 



We undertook a two year sewer extension to 
complete the core area of town. Most of the 
extensions have been completed in the first year, 
thereby realizing a savings to the town. The Manager 
and Public Works Director are to be commended for 
their fine work in this area. 



We received our first Revenue Sharing Checks and 
are hopeful that these monies will help to ease the 
strain on the overburdened taxpayer. 



The coming year will be one for belt-tightening, as 
we are faced with the financial burden of the Whittier 
Vocational School and the changeover to the fiscal 
year. While the impact appears to be serious, we, 
along with the Finance Committee, are working hard 
to reduce our own spending wherever possible. 

We were also pleased during this past year that our 
Annual Town Report won prizes in the Massachusetts 
Contest and in the New England wide contest as well. 
Congratulations are in order in particular to Town 
Manager Conti, Connie Chisholm and Jaye Farquhar 
for the effort they put forth. 



22 



List of Jurors Drawn in 1972 



Helen E. Carter 

20 Masconomet Road 
Carol Chambers 

4 Linden Street 
James E. Cunningham, Sr. 

3 Goldfinch Way 
Stanley Eustace 

High Street 
William C. Hickling, Jr. 

7 Juniper Street 
Muriel B. Horsman 

9 South Main Street 
Alice E. Keenen 

Nabby's Point Road 
David G. Kennedy 

102 High Street 



Ignatius Krol 

7 Congress Street 
Walter S. Kuconis 

168 Linebrook Road 
Janice L. Marcorelle 

21 Estes Street 
Eugene Matheson 

21 No. Main Street 
Charles Pelletier 

85 Topsfield Road 
Harris Penniman 

6 Cedar view Road 
Andrew J. Peters 

Argilla Road 



Marion H. Reedy 

25 Kimball Avenue 
Charles A. Richard 

84 Linebrook Road 
Gary Studley 

River Court 
William E. Sturgis 

County Road 
Carolyn T. Super 

86 Linebrook Road 
Mary D. Thoen 

4 Redwood Drive 
Brainard C. Wallace 

56 North Main Street 
Harriette F. White 

52 High Street 



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* 



* 



MALE 



Names Eligible to be Drawn for Jury Duty in 1973 

FEMALE 



Edward Antkowiak 

County Road 
Robert T. Bam ford 

Mill Road 
Chester S. Bartnicki 

15 Second Street 
Henry A. Beckingham 

126 County Road 
Vincent H. Boylan 

27 Mineral Street 
Robert E. Buttrick 

29 Newmarch Street 
John F. Conley 

31 High Street 
Robert W. Colter 

260 High Street 
Lawrence E. Cummings 

100 Little Neck Road 
Edwin H. Damon 

15 Eagle Hill Road 
Percy R. Dort, Jr. 

5 Mineral Street 
William E. George 

12 Water Street 
G. Mark Hayes 

64 County Road 
Carroll B. Hills 

Lab or -in- Vain Road 
Richard S. Hodgkins 

76 East Street 
Charles S. Hood 

294 Linebrook Road 
Alister N. D. Hyde 

12 Lakeman's Lane 
Peter Johnson 

10 Putnam Road 
David R. Knowlton 

56 Fellows Road 



Irving M. Lippoldt 

1 1 Mile Lane 
Gregory M. Logan 

43 High Street 
Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 

Labor-in- Vain Road 
Norman L. MacLeod, Jr. 

109 High Street 
Alvery E. Marriott, Jr. 

14% Market Street 
Albert L. Meunier, Sr. 

13 Pleasant Street 
John J. Michon, Sr. 

14 Oakhurst Avenue 
Clayton J. McKay 

13 Brownville Avenue 
Fred Paulitz 

North Ridge Road 
Kenneth E. Poor 

8 Wainwright Street 
James D. Smyth 

31 Labor-in- Vain Road 
John G. Thatcher, Jr. 

43 Upper River Road 
William C. Thomas 

18 Arrowhead Trail 
Stanley Trocki 

13 Peatfield Street 
Keith Mike Wallace 

56 North Main Street 
John H. Ward 

98 Linebrook Road 
John Wegzyn 

63 Linebrook Road 



Catherine V. Abbott 

10 Vermette Court 
Anita M. Buttrick 

29 Newmarch Street 
Beverly C. Coates 

Argilla Road 
Jean Duke 

28 Mt. Pleasant Avenue 
Sigrid von Toll Hart 

126 Argilla Road 
Joyce A. Gysan 

146 County Road 
Virginia P. Hinckley 

Newmarch Street 
Ruth Christian Home 

41 Linebrook Road 
Ellen Osgood Jennings 

199 Argilla Road 
Nancy P. Johnstone 

23 Newmarch Street 
Marly s K. Kerr 

12 Goldfinch Way 
Anne C. Kuconis 

225 Linebrook Road 
Christine Malenfant 

45 North Perley Avenue 
Helen B. McGarty 

County Road 
Elizabeth E. Phillips 

Argilla Road 
Beatrice S. Radzinski 

15 Spillers Lane 
Ruth G. Regan 

47 South Main Street 
Elizabeth D. Savage 

291 Linebrook Road 
Sarah Weatherall 

East Street 



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PLANNING BOARD 

William L. Thoen, Chairman 
John P. Prosser 
George A. Nikas 
Jason A. Sokoiov 
Curtis R. Tuttle 

A critical observer will have noticed a planning 
policy this year which was designed to involve as 
many residents of the Town as possible in the 
planning process. 

Volunteer citizens, acting collectively as a Planning 
Advisory Committee (PAC), with the Planning Board 
and Nash-Vigier Inc., Consultants, produced a 
questionnaire which was sent to 3,400 Ipswich 
residents. The questionnaire sought opinions about 
problems facing the Town and views and desires about 
the future of Ipswich. 

600 questionnaires were returned; their results are 
included in a "Problems and Opportunities Report" by 
Nash-Vigier, Inc. submitted November 16, 1972. 
Broadly, the survey indicated a strong desire for a 
limited, controlled growth, and for preservation of the 
Town's historic and rural characteristics. 

A tentative Master Plan, embodying these attitudes 
is being prepared and is expected to be completed 
early in 1973. 

In other planning activities, the Board is working 
with the Conservation Commission on a Wetlands and 
Watershed Conservacy District By-Law; has commenced 



work on revising Subdivision Regulations; and is 
working towards sponsoring a Signing By-Law revision 
originated by the PAC. 

Subdivision work continued throughout the year: In 
May, the A. B. Clark II subdivision, 37 lots, was 
submitted, however, in June it was dissapproved. In 
August, Mr. Neil St. John "Ted" Raymond discussed a 
proposal to build 280 units in 184 acres; Radice 
Realty submitted a preliminary plan for an 1150-unit 
Planned Community Development (PCD) on 340 acres: 
and the Scott Hill Subdivision was rescinded. In 
September, the PCD preliminary plans were withdrawn 
and later resubmitted; and preliminary plans for 
Bayview, a 302-unit subdivision off Topsfield Road 
was submitted. In November, the Bayview preliminary 
plans were approved; final agreements on the 
Meadowbrook Subdivision were concluded; and the 
remaining lots in the A. B. Clark I Subdivision were 
released. In December, the Board heard an informal 
presentation of plans to develop 138-units on 29 acres 
off Jeffery's Neck Road by the Archdiocese of 
Boston. Negotiations with the Radice Realty Corp. on 
the PCD are continuing, the board having extended 
the time limit 90 days. 

In October, the Planning Board held public hearings 
on three zoning articles scheduled for a special Town 
Meeting, and reported to not recommend all three. 

Planning Board membership changes during the year: 
In August, Mr. William H. Davis III resigned; in 
October, Mr. Curtis R. Tuttle was appointed to fill 
Mr. Davis' unexpired term. 



Downtown river area . . . a potential area for rebeautification 



(Ipswich Today) 




24 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 

S. Harold Perley 

Thaddeus A. Maciejowski 

Hollie A. Bucklin, Jr. 

Sharon Josephson — Associate Member 

In 1972 the Board held thirty-nine duly advertised 
public hearings. This is a record number, exceeding the 
previous record of twenty-six hearings held in 1960. 
Of the thirty-nine petitions, twenty-seven were granted, 
three were withdrawn, and nine were denied. 

Of the twenty-seven petitions granted, thirteen 
related to additions to existing buildings, four related 
to lot sizes, three concerned conversions of existing 
uses, two permitted conversions of existing dwellings 
to three -apartment dwellings, two permitted the 
keeping of horses for family use, two permitted 
construction of single family dwellings in a Limited 
Industrial district, and one permitted temporary 
occupancy of a trailer. 



Of the nine petitions denied, five involved 
apartment houses, two involved building additions, and 
two related to lot or yard size. 

The first appeal to District Court of a Board 
decision was filed in 1972. The Board was affirmed 
by the Court. There have been previous appeals to 
Superior Court (at least one of which is still pending) 
but a recent law now also permits appeals to District 
Court. 



The Zoning By-law was amended at a Special Town 
Meeting late in the year to exclude apartment houses 
from permitted uses in industrial districts. 



After the Annual Town Meeting, the Board of 
Selectmen reappointed James Theodosopoulos as a 
member, reappointed Hollie A. Bucklin, Jr., and 
appointed Sharon Josephson as Associate members. 
Later in the year, Julius Kaszuba resigned and Hollie 
Bucklin was appointed to fill his place. At the close 
of the year, an Associate member vacancy existed. 



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TOWN MANAGER 

Richard N. Conti 

Government has the responsibility to plan ahead 
and set goals for future accomplishment. Since 
government is a combination of all the interactions 
within any community including social, economical, 
political and personal; planning ahead and setting goals 
is no stranger to each individual citizen of Ipswich. 
Without planning and goal setting, community and 
personal life tends to exist as a shapeless and 
undirected ameoba. In 1971 I suggested various goals 
designated for immediate and future accomplishment. 



The following advancements in achieving those goals 
set forth in the 1970 Annual Town Report are: 

1. Enhancing the availability of town officials to the 
public. For the past year the Board of Assessors 
has been meeting each Tuesday evening at 7:30 
p.m. to hear complaints and receive petitions for 
abatement. Also the Town Clerk and Veteran's 
Agent are available each Tuesday from 6:00 p.m. to 
9:00 p.m. Commencing Thursday, February 01, 
1973, these offices will change evenings to Thursday 
from 6:00 to 9:00. 

2. The development of the Limited Development 
Corporation will encourage 'clean' industry and 
commercial enterprise to locate in Ipswich. This 
should lead to more jobs for the unemployed and a 
widening of the Town's tax base. This has occurred 
with excellent cooperation between the Economic 
and Industrial Development Commission and the 
Chamber of Commerce. 

3. Resolution of the Town long-range water needs 
through examination of the 30B site. In late 1972 
the Commonwealth engaged engineers to survey and 
take test borings within the 30B site. A report will 
be rendered in early 1973 and should indicate the 
feasibility or not of the proposed reservoir project. 

4. Strengthening of Public Safety through police 
investigation. With the addition of a permanent 
police investigator more crimes have been solved 
and cases successfully brought to court. Since the 
crime rate dropped in Ipswich during 1972, we can 
assume that good investigatory work combined with 
increased patrolling were positive deterrants to crime 
in 1972. 

As we achieve accomplishments, the community 
generates new situations and problems which become 
the goals of tomorrow. Some things are yet unresolved 
such as P.C.D., Historic District Development and 
Atomic Power. 



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During the year good progress was made on the 
Master Plan effort. A survey was conducted and 
numerous Master Plan Advisory Committee meetings 
were held. For those citizens who have not 
participated at this point, it is not too late. As the 
Master Goals are being developed in early 1973 it is 
imperative that we receive maximum citizen input. 

Due to the planning efforts during the past year it 
appears that the community desires a policy of 
ungrowth. What does this mean? It does not mean no 
growth, but controlled and guided growth designed to 
be advantageous to the preservation of basic 
community values and life. We must preserve our 
historic and natural heritage through restoration and 
preservation. Also we must have the means to do this 
in an unburdening fashion. We must align our 
priorities with reality. This means being considerate of 
all people and all interests in the community. Let us 
ask everyone, and let us all participate in creating the 
true future community. 

We do not want to have a 'melting pot' of ideas 
and interaction as much as we want a 'mosaic' of 
ideas, people and interaction. In a mosaic each tiny 
piece retains its own color, texture and proper 
identity. It never melts or fuses into pieces next to it. 
Once completed, the beauty and richness of the entire 
mosaic is that a new and larger entity has been 
created without the destruction of any of the 
distinctive beauty of the constituent pieces. 



Again this year we were fortunate in having an 
administrative intern during the summer. Robin Carter 
worked with the Town under the Emergency 
Employment Act. He performed extensive records 
research work for the Town Clerk, and coordinated 
the Town role in Olde Ipswich Week. 

As we look into the future, there are some very 
obvious immediate needs to be fulfilled: 



1 . Completion of the 1 .5 mgd Sewage Treatment 
Plant. 

2. Formalizing the structure of the Town's Recycling 
Program to attain a more effective impact. 

3. Cleaning and cement lining of all iron water mains 
to effectively eliminate all 'red water' problems. 

4. Restructuring of the subdivision control regulations 
utilizing past experience to tighten controls on 
developers. 

5. Operation of a full time Building Inspector's Office 
to work closely with the Planning Board and 
Zoning Board of Appeals in achieving strict building 
code and Zoning compliance. 

6. Establisliment of a Capital Construction Program 
which combines both the school and general 
government needs. 

LET US ASK EVERYONE AND LET US ALL 
PARTICIPATE IN CREATING THE TRUE FUTURE 
COMMUNITY. 



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ACCOUNTANT DEPARTMENT 
Robert H. Leet, Accountant 

The Accounting Department performs many and 
various functions during the year which are very 
necessary and important in maintaining the Town's 
stability. 



All the general financial records of the Town are 
maintained in this office by our devoted and 
conscientious employees. Their primary duties are: 
processing all Town payrolls and bill vouchers, 
maintaining health and life insurance records, and 
handling various other problems which arise. 



The annual budget, both preliminary and final, was 
prepared and distributed. Also the Financial section of 
the Town Report was compiled. Various other reports 
were prepared for the following: Bureau of Accounts, 
State Tax Commission, Bureau of Census-Federal, 
various banks, town departments and committees, 
research bureaus, and other financial institutions — 
showing the complete financial transactions and 
condition of the Town. 



We have been busy preparing for the fiscal year 
change which should prove to be interesting and 
possibly chaotic. 



During the year one of our employees (Alice 
Georgeopoulos) left to have a baby. She was replaced 
by Mr. Edwin Bronk who has done an excellent job 
since his appointment. 



Detailed financial statements for the year 1972 are 
set forth in the colored pages of this report. 



26 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Varnum S. Pedrick, Chief Assessor 
William R. Lewis 
John D. Heaphy 



Assessments: The total assessed value of real estate 
and personal property committed to the collectors 
office for collection was $66,505,007. This represents 
an increase to widen our tax base of $1,934,960. 
which helped us to maintain our tax rate by saving us 
about $1.92 on a $1,000. assessed value. 

Our office also committed for collection 7007 
motor vehicle excise tax bills for collection which 
amounted to over $296,913. and added about this 
amount to our treasury. 

We received from the building inspector 134 
building permits for new and remodeling construction, 
many of which should add substantially to our tax 
base for 1973. 

The activity of this office in maintaining up-to-date 
value records has been instrumental in bringing to the 
Town the large amount of Revenue Sharing funds that 
we received in December, 1972 and January, 1973. 
Part of the formula for determining the funds is based 
upon evaluation. As a community achieves close to, or 
100%, evaluation, this enhances the tax effort portion 
of the formula, thus enhancing the total amount for 
the community. 



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TREASURER-COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

The following bills were sent out: 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Animal Excise 
Sewer Betterment 



Check Register Balances were reconciled with Bank 
Statements. 



Federal and State Withholding Tax Statements were 
distributed. 



A Record of Trust Fund transactions was 
maintained. A schedule of Receipts was rendered to 
the Town Accountant monthly. 

The Treasurer's Office is the Nerve Center of the 
Town and must accept all responsibilities, under the 
Statue General Laws of Massachusetts. 

The fact that tax collections have been at 
approximately 99% of expectations, it was instrumental 
in enhancing the amount of money received under the 
Revenue Sharing program. One part of the formula 
takes into account tax effort. This part of the formula 
is increased or decreased relative to the type of 
valuation and collections that each municipality has. 
We are at 100% evaluation and collections are 
approximately 99% of the taxes owed to the Town, 
so that this part of the formula is a strong plus 
towards producing the largest probably figure under 
the Revenue Sharing Formula. 



27 



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TOWN COUNSEL 



F. Dale Vincent 



At the beginning of the year the Town of Ipswich 
was defendant in Superior Court in five separate eases 
involving a suit for a declaratory judgement against the 
Town, the Selectmen, the Moderator and the Town 
Clerk; a suit for damage allegedly due to a fall on a 
defective sidewalk; a suit for further damage for taking 
a sewer easement by eminent domain; a suit for 
property damage incident to sewer construction; and 
an appeal to the Superior Court of a refusal of the 
Sewer Commissioner to grant an abatement of a 
betterment assessment. The suit for a declaratory 
judgement was dismissed by the Court after hearings. 
The suit for damage caused by a fall and for damage 
caused by the sewer easement taking were disposed o\' 
without liability. The suit with respect to the sewer 



abatement was settled by compromise advantageously 
to the Town. Of the five Superior Court actions 
pending at the beginning of the year only the suit for 
property damage incident to sewer construction is still 
outstanding. 

During the year the Town instituted suit against a 
developer for damage for failure to perform a contract 
to complete certain improvements in a subdivision. An 
appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals is 
pending in Superior Court. Another appeal from the 
decision by the Board of Appeals was brought in 
the District Court and the Board of Appeals decision 
upheld. A suit against the Town for back pay by the 
policeman allegedly injured on duty has been 
commenced in Superior Court, and the Building 
Inspector and Town Manager are being sued in 
Superior Court to compel the issuance of a building 
permit for an apartment complex which was refused 
to be issued in view of the Town's overtaxed sewer 
disposal plant. 

In addition to the foregoing, opinions with respect 
to various questions have been furnished to the 
Selectmen, Town Manager, Library Trustees, School 
Department, Planning Board, Board of Health, 
Cemetery Department, Building Inspector, Shellfish 
Advisory Commission and Housing Authority. 

Proposed revisions of the Town By-Laws have been 
reviewed and Chapter 111 of the By-Laws revised and 
passed by the Town Meeting and approved by the 
Attorney General. 

A proposed Flood Plain Zoning By-Law and a Wet 
Lands Conservancy By-Law is under consideration in 
anticipation of the 1973 ATM. 



* 



During the summer, our Town was honored by a visit from the Worshipful, The Mayor of Ipswich, England, Alderman Walter 

H. Mulley, (center/ and Water Engineer Peter Hothersall, /left/ 

After a tour of the great Appleton Estate, Mrs. Appleton served tea to the English guests. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



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28 



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INVEST IN THE FUTURE OF IPSWICH 



INVEST IN THE FUTURE OF IPSWICH 







ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Norman MacLeod 
Peter Williamson 
John Rieman 
Terrance McSweeney 



Carmen Marciano, Chairman 
Richard Banville 
Louis Joslyn 
Thomas Emery 
Dale Dudgeon 

The Economic and Industrial Development 
Commission was re-activated in the spring of 1972 
by Town Manager Conti, with the following 
members, Richard Banville, Louis Joslyn, Thomas 
Emery, Dale Dudgeon, Norman MacLeod, Peter 
Williamson, John Rieman, Terrance McSweeney 
and Carmen Marciano, Chairman. 

The members of the commission began an 
active program to help the Town of Ipswich. 
Some of the problems facing the community in 
the past few years were the high percentage of 
property taxes in the Town paid by the single 
family homeowner, and the lack of an adequate job 
market. The commission worked in trying to solve 
these two basic problems, by first trying to attract 
business and industry to the Town which would 
broaden the tax base and fit in with the long 
range plans of the community, and second to 
create an active employment market. 

In the summer, Commission member Louis 
Joslyn suggested the commission investigate the 
possibility of starting a Local Development Com- 



pany. To accomplish this we held a meeting with 
the local representative of the Small Business 
Administration, Robert Indrassino, James Coffey, 
Vice President of Bay State National Bank, George 
McGregor, President of the Haverhill National 
Bank and a Representative from the Dept. of 
Commerce for the state of Mass. After this and 
several other meetings the EIDC voted unanimous- 
ly to establish a non-profit local development 
company in the Town of Ipswich. 

On December 14th, 1972 at an open meeting, 
over 30 citizens of the community paid $50 each 
for shares of stock to officially start the Ipswich 
Local Development Corporation. 

Commission member Tom Emery proposed the 
slogan for the new Corp. "Invest in the Future of 
Ipswich". 

I would like to take this opportunity to pub- 
licly thank the citizens of the Town for their 
support and the commission members for all their 
hard work in the past year. 



INVEST IN THE FUTURE OF IPSWICH 



INVEST IN THE FUTURE OF IPSWICH 



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Gas renewals 7.00 

Clam Permits 6,205.00 

Miscellaneous 194.00 

TOTAL $11,469.00 

Turned into the Division of 

Fisheries and Game $ 2,413.50 



Harry Munro, Town Moderator; Harold Comeau, Town 
Clerk; and Donna Clapp, Town Meeting Secretary, com- 
pute figures during the 1972 Annual Town Meeting. 

(Ipswich Today) 

TOWN CLERK Harold Comeau 

Comparative vital statistics recorded for the past 
four years are as follows: 

1969 1970 1971 1972 

Births 195 154 149 112 

Deaths 129 109 141 154 

Marriages 125 131 121 123 

All the births recorded were to Ipswich residents. 
Of the total number of deaths recorded, 108 were 
Ipswich residents. The age of the oldest Ipswich 
resident was 98 years, 3 months, 1 1 days. 

REVENUE: 

Turned into the Town treasury 





1971 


1972 


Dog Licenses 


$ 2,826.70 


$2,224.45 


Marriage Licenses 


236.00 


226.00 


Certified copies 


338.00 


437.00 


Recordings 


1 ,744.50 


1,734.16 



LICENSES 

Dogs: 

Males 

Females 

Spayed Females 

Kennels: SI 0.00 
$25.00 
TOTAL 

CLAM PERMITS 

Residents 
Non-Residents: Daily 

Yearly 
TOTAL 

FISH & GAME 

Fishing, Regular 
Fishing Minor 
Fishing, Female 
Fishing, Non-resident 
Hunting, resident 
Hunting, Non-resident 
Sporting, Regular 
Sporting, Free 

Sporting, Military Free Resident 
Trapping, Regular 
Trapping, Minor 
Archery Stamps 
Duplicate Licenses 
TOTAL 

REGISTERED VOTERS: 6909 



1971 

509 
135 
324 
2 
3 
973 

1971 
817 
418 
210 

1,445 

1971 

147 

27 

25 

3 

144 

3 

82 

32 

9 

4 

2 

2 

6 

486 



6.50 

6,500.00 

366.42 

$11,494.53 

$ 2,366.00 
1972 

403 

55 
268 

1 

5 

732 

1972 
800 
384 
236 

1,420 

1972 

140 

24 

21 

7 

106 

3 

66 

25 

8 

1 

1 

3 

7 

412 



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HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John F. Conley, Chairman 
Barbara C. Emberly 
Louise B. Hodgkins 



George R. Mathey 
Lovell Thompson 
Alice Keenan 
John H. Updike 



The members of the Ipswich Historical Commission 
have held regular meetings twice monthly at the Town 
Hall during the past year and have lent their support 
to and participated in all civic matters pertaining to 
the historic aspects of the community. 

The Commission has continued its work on the 
Ipswich Historical Preservation Demonstration Project. 
The program, made possible by funds supplied by the 
Ipswich Heritage Trust, and matched by funds supplied 
by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, has proved to be very valuable. Guided 
by the professional direction of John Cole, the 
Commission has executed covenants with 15 owners of 
old and historic Ipswich properties in a pioneer 
program designed to preserve and protect the 
irreplaceable architectural features of the past. 

The members of the Commission have given their 
enthusiastic support and energies to "Olde Ipswich 
Days", sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce and 
actively participated in "17th Century Day", sponsored 



jointly by the Ipswich Historical Society and the 
Ipswich Garden Club. 

In an effort to record and preserve the recollections 
of the more recent past, the Commission has joined 
forces with the "Ipswich Speaks" program and has 
loaned a tape recorder to aid in the project. We wish 
to thank all those citizens who have so generously 
given of their time to record their recollections of 
Ipswich. 

The Commission has replaced old plaques and 
affixed new ones on the historic homes of the 
community. This is a continuing project, and we are 
pleased at the favorable response from home-owners, 
residents and visitors to the town. 

The Commission wishes to acknowledge with regret 
the resignation of John Markos from the Commission. 
Mr. Markos has assisted in many of the projects 
undertaken by the Commission, and we appreciate his 
continuing interest. We welcomed new member, John 
Updike. 

During the coming year, the members will continue 
their work on the HUD Preservation Program, hoping 
to bring it to a conclusion with the printing of the 
final report. We also expect to formulate tentative 
plans for the Town's participation in the 1976 
Bi-Centennial Celebration. 



30 




After a work session, these youths relax on the front steps of their new quarters. 



(Ipswich Today) 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Annette I. George, Director 

Bro. W. Robert Russell, Chairman 

David L. Baldwin 

Mary Graffum 

Peter Haskell 

Cathleen McGinley 

George W. Pacheco 

Deborah Hovey 

1972 has been a full and successful year for the 
Ipswich Youth Commission. In June the Drop-In-Center 
moved to larger quarters in the South Parish House. 
The increased space brought about an increase in the 
number of young people participating in the overall 
program. Among the activities the Youth Commission 
has been responsible for are the following: 

323 evenings at the Drop-In-Center 

5 sessions on Drug Education with outside 

consultants 
18 movies 

Counseling for disturbed young people 
Lessons in Arts and Crafts 
3 Rock Concerts at Castle Hill 
5 Dances 
Support of Summer lacrosse program 

In early September, word was received from the 
Department of Youth Services that retroactive to July, 
no further funding would be forthcoming from the 
Commonwealth. At the present time the fate of the 
Youth Commission is uncertain as budget deliberations 
of the Finance Committee are still undisclosed. 

The Ipswich Youth Commission depends largely on 
contributions from the community. The many hours 
given by volunteers at the Drop-In-Center and the 
many donations of furniture have increased during 
1972. 



WHAT WE DO FOR THE YOUTH TODAY .... WILL 
BE DONE FOR THE COMMUNITY OF TOMORROW" 



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Bowling is one of the many recreational activities made 
available by the Youth Commissions new quarters on the 
South Village Green. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



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£".£./!. Cac/ef Charles Schwartz and Police Chief Armand 
Brouillette examine a stalk of confiscated "grass". 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

It is with great humility and some amount of pride 
that we can report to you that your police 
department has been able to contain not only the 
rate of increase of crime, but also that crime has 
decreased in our community. The recent F.B.I, report 
on the rate of crime indicates, that throughout the 
country, law enforcement agencies report a drop in 
the rate of increase of crime. In Ipswich we report a 
drop in crime itself as presented in the statistical 
table. 

There are many factors which enter into an 
explanation for this decrease, such as; a more stable 



social atmosphere, a decrease in campus unrest, a 
decrease in incidence of hard drugs. Perhaps the most 
significant factors for this achievement were the 
increase of patrol activity and the utilization of an 
investigation force in the department. The patrol 
activity increased from two to three cars which was a 
50% increase in patrol capability. Also the decrease we 
show in Ipswich can be explained by the fact that we 
had five EEA employees funded by the Federal 
Emergency Employment Act. We were fortunate to 
have had three of these people working as cadet 
police officers and doing patrol and street duty. The 
other two were civilian desk clerks who answered 
phones, dispatched calls and received complaints over 
the desk. This enabled a police officer, who did this 
work, to go out onto the street where he was more 
efficiently used. We have recently lost the two civilian 
desk clerks. They have taken up other endeavors, and 
we will loose the three cadet policemen by June 1 , as 
the program of EEA will have ended at that time. 

We have added a two cell lock-up to replace the 
four cells which were condemned. These are used to 
overflow capacity on many occasions. There is a need 
for storage place and more office space. The Town 
Manager and Selectmen are presently looking into 
space needs' for all town departments. 

We are grateful to be able to serve with all 
members of the department who's goal is to continue 
to decrease crime and make Ipswich a safe place in 
which to live, work, and play. 

Sgt. Bolcy Rad/.inski 

Sgt. Frank Geist 

Sgt. Joseph Carpenter 

Ptl. Insp. Walter KJimaszewski 

Ptl. Edward Rauschcr 

Ptl. Arthur Solomonides 

Ptl. Peter Foote 

Ptl. Richard Lombard 

Ptl. Nicholas Fiory 

Ptl. Edward Walsh 

Ptl. John Poiricr 

Ptl. George Stevenson 

Ptl. James Soutcr 

Ptl. Charles Surpitski 

Ptl. Richard Burns 

Sp. Ptl. William Moseley 

Cadet Ptl. Lawrence Jordan 

Cadet Ptl. Charles Schwartz 

Cadet Ptl. Theodore LeMieux 

Matron and secretary Mrs. Joyce Gysan 



REPORT OF RANDOM ITEMS TAKEN FROM RECORD BOOKS FOR YEARS LISTED 



ITEM 

COURT CASES 
MOTOR VEH. ACC. 
BURGLARY & B&E 
LARCENIES 
STOLEN MOTOR VEH 
BLDGS. FOUND OPEN 
ANIMAL CASES 
COMPLTS. ANSWERED 1761 
NO. OF OFFICERS 



1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


1971 


1972 


273 


367 


364 


406 


469 


462 


687 


492 


807 


965 


816 


344 


399 


342 


352 


386 


399 


463 


508 


505 


576 


527 


37 


41 


41 


54 


60 


66 


120 


162 


148 


177 


137 


129 


131 


122 


126 


152 


143 


146 


260 


235 


306 


284 


11 


20 


27 


28 


33 


34 


38 


34 


41 


44 


33 


214 


193 


285 


289 


246 


237 


172 


216 


217 


572 


840 


294 


288 


284 


312 


234 


239 


281 


290 


430 


484 


433 


1761 


1811 


1711 


1847 


1692 


2232 


2881 


3661 


5337 


7957 


8411 


13 


13 


13 


13 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 plus 



32 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
For the Town of 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Year Ending December 31, 1972 



REPORT OF AN AUDIT 

of 

THE ACCOUNTS OF 

THE TOWN OF IPSWICH 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Bureau of Accounts 

State Office Buildinq, Government Center 

100 Cambridge STreet, Boston 02202 

CLEO F. JAILLET GORDON A. McGILL 

Commissioner Director of Accounts 



February 10, 1972 
To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Joseph A. Navarro, Chairman 
Ipswich, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and accounts of 
the town of Ipswich for the period from December 15, 1968 to July 31, 1972, 
made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This 
is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. Walter F. ABel , Assistant 
Chief of Bureau. 

Very truly yours , 

GORDON A. McGILL 

Director of Accounts 

GAM: EM 



Mr. Gordon A. McGill 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Sir: 



In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit of 
the books and accounts of the town of Ipswich for the period from 
December 15, 1968, the date of the previous examination, to July 31, 
1971, and submit the following report thereon: 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the 
several departments receiving or disbursing money for the town or 
committing bills for collection, were examined, checked, and verified 
by comparison with the books of the town accountant and the treasurer. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were examined 
and checked. The ledger accounts were analyzed, the receipts as 
recorded were checked with the available departmental records and with 
the treasurer's books, while the payments were compared with the treasury 
warrants authorizing the disbursement of town funds and with the 
treasurer's cash book. The appropriation accounts and loan authorizations 
were checked with the amounts voted by the town as shown by the town 
clerk's records of the town meetings, and the transfers from the reserve 
fund were compared with the amounts authorized by the finance committee. 

A trial balance was taken off, and a balance sheet, which is 
appended to this report, was prepared showing the financial condition 
of the town as of July 31, 1971. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were examined and 
checked. The receipts as recorded were analyzed and checked with the 



town accountant's books, with the records in the several departments 
collecting money for the town, and with other sources from which money 
was paid into the town treasury, while the payments were compared with 
the approved warrants and with the accountant's books. The cash balance 
on July 31 f 1971 was proved by reconciliation of the bank balances with 
statements furnished by the banks of deposit, by inspection of the 
savings bank books, by verification of the certificates of deposit, and 
by actual count of the cash in the office. 

During the progress of the audit of the treasurer's bank 
accounts it was discovered that payrolls had been processed through the 
computer services division of a bank, in which connection it was noted 
that the treasurer had no cancelled checks nor any bank statement to 
substantiate the detailed transactions. The treasurer should comply 
with the requirements of the State accounting system pertaining to 
adequate fiscal control by only entering into agreements for computerized 
payroll services whereby he will be assured that cancelled checks and 
monthly bank statements will be furnished to him. 

The recorded payments on account of maturing debt and interest 
were checked with the amounts falling due and with the cancelled 
securities and coupons on file. The outstanding bonds and coupons on 
July 31, 1971 were listed and reconciled with statements furnished by 
the banks of deposit. 

The transactions of the several trust and investment funds in 
the custody of the town treasurer, the treasurer of the library trustees, 
the trustees of the Manning School Funds, the Brown School Fund, and the 
Burley Education Fund, and of the Feoffees of the Grammar Schools of 
Ipswich were checked. The securities and savings bank books representing 



the investment of these funds were examined and listed, the income was 
proved, the withdrawals were verified, and the transfers to the town 
were compared with the receipts as recorded on the treasurer's cash book. 

The records of the tax titles and tax possessions held by the 
town were examined. The additions to the tax title account were checked 
with the town collector's records, the redemptions were compared with 
the treasurer's cash bock, and the tax titles and tax possessions on 
hand were listed, reconciled with the town accountant's ledger, and 
compared with the records at the Registry of Deeds. 

The records of employees* payroll deductions for Federal and 
State taxes, the county retirement system, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, 
and group insurance were examined. The deductions were proved and 
payments to the proper agencies were verified. 

The books and accounts of the town collector were examined and 
checked. The tax, excise, assessment, departmental, and water accounts 
outstanding at the time of the previous examination, as well as all 
subsequent commitments, were audited and proved. The recorded collections 
were compared with the payments to the treasurer, the abatements were 
checked with the assessors' and other departmental records of abatements 
granted, the taxes transferred to the tax title account were checked with 
the treasurer's records of tax titles held by the town, and the 
outstanding accounts were listed and reconciled with the town accountant's 
ledger. 

The records of apportioned sewer assessments were examined and 
checked. The payments in advance were checked with the treasurer's 
recorded receipts, the abatements were compared with the assessors' 
records of abatements granted, the amounts added to taxes 1969 and 1970 

were checked with the town collector's books, and the apportionments due 

5 



in future years, as well as the suspended assessments, were listed- and 
reconciled with the respective ledger accounts. 

The books and accounts of the municipal light department were 
examined and checked. The recorded collections were compared with the 
payments to the treasurer, the abatements and discounts were verified, 
and the outstanding accounts were listed. 

The records of municipal light consumers' deposits were 
examined and checked. The controlling account in the ledger was analyzed, 
the refunds were verified, and the deposits on hand July 31, 1971 were 
listed and proved. 

Verification of the outstanding tax, excise, assessment, 
departmental, municipal light, and water accounts was made by mailing 
notices to a number of persons whose names appeared on the books as 
owing money to the town, and from the replies received it appears that 
the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

The town clerk's records pertaining to dog and sporting 
licenses issued, as well as to collections for recording fees, marriage 
intentions, etc., were examined and checked. The cash book was footed 
and the payments to the treasurer and to the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were verified. The cash balance on July 31, 1971 was proved by 
reconciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished by the 
bank of deposit, and by actual count of the cash in the office. 

The records of departmental cash collections by the board of 
selectmen, the sealer of weights and measures, and the plumbing, gas, 
and building inspectors, as well as by the health, recreation, and 
school departments, and by all other departments in which money was 



collected for the town, were examined and checked. The payments to the 
town treasurer were verified by comparison with the treasurer's and the 
town accountant's books, and the cash on hand in the several departments 
was proved. 

The books and accounts of the treasurer of the Eastern Essex 
Veterans' Services District were examined and checked. The recorded 
receipts were analyzed and verified by comparison with the amounts paid 
by the member towns of the district. The payments, as entered, were 
checked with the approved warrants authorizing the disbursement of 
district funds, and the cash balance on July 31, 1971 was proved by 
reconciliation of the bank balance with a statement furnished by the 
bank of deposit. 

The surety bonds filed by the town officials required to 
furnish them for the faithful performance of their duties were examined 
and found to be in proper form. 

There are appended to this report, in addition to the balance 
sheet, tables showing reconciliations of the treasurer's and the town 
clerk's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, tax 
possession, departmental, municipal light, and water accounts, as well 
as schedules showing the condition and transactions of the trust and 
investment funds. 

During the progress of the audit cooperation was received from 
all officials of the town, for which, on behalf of my assistants and for 
myself, I wish to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET- DECEMBER 31, 1972 



ASSETTS 



CASH 




General 


923,272.18 


Petty: 




Accounting 


5.00 


Schools 


25.00 


Electric 


375.00 


Certificate of Deposit 




Non Revenue 


48,000.00 


Federal Revenue Funds Invstd 


137,640.00 




1,109,317. 


ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLES 




Taxes: 





Levy of 1966 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1967 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1969 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1970 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1971 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1972 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1973 

Real Estate 



Motor Vehicle Excise: 



Levy 


of 


1964 


Levy 


of 


1965 


Levy 


of 


1966 


Levy 


of 


1967 


Levy 


of 


1968 


Levy 


of 


1969 


Levy 


of 


1970 


Levy 


of 


1971 


Levy 


of 


1972 



LIABILITIES & RESERVE 



Premium on Loans 

Payroll Deductions : 

Retirement Withholding 

Union 

State Withholding 

Health Insurance Ded 

Paid In 
Consortium 
O.M.E Ded 

Paid in 
Life Insurance Ded 

Paid In 
Consortium 



734.80 



Tax Title and Possessions 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possession 



29.70 


Tax Sheltered Annuities 




Clothing Allowance 


82.50 




150.00 


Guarantee Deposits: 




Electric Meter 


345.80 


Contract Performance 


199.36 




310.80 


Overestimates: 


10,651.80 


State Recreation 




Metro Air Pollution 


6,555.02 


Ipswich River Watershed 


106,771.79 




(4,032.00) 


Tailings: 


121,064.77 


Unclaimed Checks 




Gifts and Bequests: 


1,560.38 


Trustees of Reservation 


2,887.11 


Audubon Ecology 


343.21 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


1,524.65 




575,08 




460.15 


Teachers Retirement Refund 


2,836.84 




6,770.79 


Federal Grants: 


38,044.94 


School: 


55,003.15 


National Defense Title III 




Vocational Education 




ESEA Title I 


6,371.60 


ESEA Title II 


7,557.30 


PL 874 


13,928.90 


PL 91-230 Title VIB 




Revenue Sharing 




Historic District H.U.D. 



5,398.17 

224.50 

9,906.39 

3,456.48 

359.60 

196.55 

17.16 

105.60 

160.54 

12.64 

4.95 

636.01 

3.98 

20,482.57 



7,189.00 
26,500.00 
33,689.00 



3,626.25 

44.76 
1,038.27 

4,709.28 



4,867.08 



200.00 

50.00 

325.00 



575.00 



37.53 



1,362.28 

12.28 

5,105.50 

1,018.86 

6,493.00 

4,493.00 

137,640.00 

4,716.67 

160,841.59 



8 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1972 



ASSETS 






LIABILITIES 6c RESERVES 




Special Assessments: 






State Grants: 






Sewer to Taxes: 






Youth Commission 


4,688.33 




Levy of 1971 


22.32 




Highway Ch. 58 


50,515.26 




Levy of 1972 


423.02 






55,203. 


59 


Committed Interest: 












Levy of 1971 


25.44 




County: 






Levy of 1972 


251.02 
721. 


80 


Dog License Refund 
Revolving Funds: 


1,590. 


28 


Special Taxes 


1,286. 


17 


School Cafeteria 
School Athletics 


13,666.01 
2,748.26 




Departmental: 








16,414. 


27 


Town Property 


1,013.06 










Engineering 


45.00 




Other Funds: 






Health 


172.14 




Highway Machinery 


271.91 




Veterans 


35,051.48 




Sale of Cemetery Lots 


5,549.95 




Highway Machinery 


690.63 




Conservation 


25,579.40 




Cemetery 


609.00 




Manning 


297.75 




Education 


101.93 
37,683. 


24 




31,699. 


01 


Municipal Electric: 






Operating Balances: 






Rates & Charges 


140,629. 


42 


Revenue : 
General 


340,813.30 




Water: 






Electric: 






Liens Added to Taxes: 






Construction 


1,330.37 




Levy of 1970 


108.20 




Bond Issue Proceeds 


237.04 




Levy of 1971 


204.67 




Depreciation 


14,513.20 




Levy of 1972 


2,265.09 




Water: 






Rates & Charges 


31,908.89 




Dows Reservoir 


516.69 






34,486. 


85- 


Construction 1969 


430.71 




Sewer: 






1970 


10,543.26 




Liens Added to Taxes: 






1971 


13,313.54 




Levy of 1971 


23.52 




Plant 6c Investment 


646.49 




Levy of 1972 


453.03 






382,344. 


60 


Rates & Charges 


2,509.87 












2,986. 


42 


Loans Authorized 6c Unissued 


4,003,500. 


00 


Aid to Highways: 












State 


19,500.00 




Receipts Reserved for Appropri 


ation: 




County 


9,750.00 




State Aid for Libraries 


4,031.25 






29,250. 


00 


Water Pollution Control 


3,570.00 




her 






Cemetery Perpetual Care Reimb 7,000.00 
Cemetery Flower Fund Reimb. 300.00 




Loans Authorized: 




Sewer Construction 






Sewer 


50,579.04 




Art 63 3-7-66 


343,000.00 






65,480. 


29 


School Constructior 












Art 6 STM 1-16-67 


100,000.00 










School Repairs 






Veterans Recovery 


25. 


00 


Art 39 ATM 1967 


500.00 










Fire Truck Art 1 STM 3- 


-72 60,000.00 










Sewer Treatment Plant 












Art 16 3-1-71 


3,500,000.00 
4,003,500. 


00 









TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1972 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts : 

ESEATitle I 4.42 

County Tax 5,280.12 

Mosquito Control 1972 287.68 

Water Operations 10,000.00 
Overlay Deficit: 

Levy of 1966 56.10 



Court Judgment 



Federally Aided P.W. Revenue 



Overlay Reserved for Abatements : 

Levy of 1967 82.50 

Levy of 1969 150.00 

Levy of 1970 345.80 

Levy of 1971 10,962.60 

Levy of 1972 113,326.81 

124,867.71 



4,161.60 



19,789.92 Overlay Surplus 



43,152.75 



11,500.00 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Aid to Highways 

Tax Title 

Tax Possession 

Electric 

Water 

Sewer 

Special Tax 



55,003.15 

37,683.24 

29,250.00 

6,371.60 

7,557.30 

140,629.42 

34,486.85 

3,708.22 

1,286.17 

315,975.95 



Reserved for Petty Cash Advance 405.00 
Anticipation Reimb Federal P.W. 11,500.00 



Surplus Revenue 
General 
Electric 
Water 



5,581,147.82 



260,137.44 
40,826.13 
2,088.95 
303,052.52 
5.581.147.82 



Source: Town Accountant 



10 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET -DECEMBER 31, 1972 

Debt Accounts 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt : 
Inside Debt Limit: 

General 
Outside Debt Limit: 

General 

Municipal Electric 

Water 



798,000.00 

491,000.00 
271,000.00 
530,000.00 
1,292,000.00 



Serial Loans : 

Inside Debt Limit: 
General 

Sewer Construction 
Payne School Repairs 
Fire Equipment 



Outside Debt Limit: 
Sewer Construction 
School Construction 



698,000.00 
40,000.00 
60,000.00 
798,000.00 



300,000.00 
191,000.00 
491,000.00 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 
Suspended Sewer Assessments 

Not Due 





Municipal Electric 271,000.00 




Water 530,000.00 




1,292,000.00 


2.090.000.00 


2,090,0QQ t QQ 


Deferred Revenue Accounts 




Apportioned Sewer Revenue Due: 


121,024.41 


1973 11,508.15 




1974 10,472.61 


1,220.40 


1975 9,488.06 




1976 9,356.06 




1977 8,774.94 




1978 8,750.14 




1979 8,395.47 




1980 7,327.33 




1981 6,775.54 




1982 6,570.20 




1983 5,275.90 




1984 4,990.89 




1985 4,516.76 




1986 4,516.76 




1987 4,016.04 




1988 3,871.19 




1989 3,175.09 




1990 1,731.18 




1991 1,512.10 




121,024.41 




Suspended Sewer 1,220.40 


122.244.81 


122.244.81 



Source: Town Accountant 



11 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1972 

Trust and Investment Accounts 



Trust and Investment Funds : 
Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Treasurer 
In Custody of Trustees 



419,055.19 
285,612.23 



In Custody of Treasurer : 
Animal Fund: 

Mrs. William Brown 

School Funds: 

Eunice Caldwell Cowles 

Scholarship 
Mark Newman Memorial 

Mar i anna F. Jones 



4,538.61 



10,162.17 
8,633.40 
2,149.45 



Library Funds: 
John C. Kimball 



756.47 



Park Funds : 

Appleton Memorial Fountain 1,563.28 
Martha I Savory-Tree 804.84 
Dow Boulder Memorial 375.53 

Richard T. Crane Jr. 

Picnic Fund 43,235.71 



Cemetery Funds: 
Perpetual Care 
Flower 

Investment Funds: 
Stabilization 



145,290.20 
7,381.68 



194,163.85 
419,055.19 



In Custody of Trustees : 
School Funds: 

Burley 

Brown 

Manning 

R. H. Manning 

Feoffees of Grammar 
Schools 
Library Funds: 

Heard 

Elizabeth Lathrop 

Library Building 

Mis 8 Abby Newman 

George Spiller 

Tread we 11 



704.667^42 



12,110.23 

6,467.74 

58,188.41 

27,069.42 

133,137.43 

10,721.01 
1,854.90 

13,686.35 
4,804.20 
1,812.05 

15,760.49 
285,612.23 

704.667.42 

— - ■ ■ *■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ' 



Source: Town Accountant 



12 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



Taxes: 

Real Estate: 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Le v y of 1972 
Levy of 1973 



Personal Property: 
Levy of 1968 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 



Farm Animal Excise: 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 



In Lieu of Taxes: 

State Owned Property 

Cranes Beach 

Ipswich Housing Authority 



18,822.31 

113,765.52 

3,434,100.15 

4,032.00 

3,570,219.98 



99.60 

607.73 

3,376.80 

86,244.68 

90,328.81 



20.00 
179.80 



199.80 



22,665.72 

11,658.21 

864.00 



35,187.93 



State General Fund Distributions: 



Valuation Basis 
Machinery Basis 
School Aid Chapter 70 
Special Education Ch 69&71 
Lottery 



18,625.78 

4,512.27 

601,164.80 

79,725.00 

37,210.42 

741,238.27 



Licenses & Permits.: 
Selectmen: 

Alcoholic Beverages 

Amusement 

Auto Dealers 

Common Victualler 

Auctioneer 

Junk 

Shellfish Permits 

Occupancy Permits 

Antique Dealers 
Town Clerk: 

Clam Permits 
Police: 

License to Carry Firearms 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 
Health & Sanitation: 

Septic Tank 

Camp, Cabin & Motel License 

Milk,01eo & Ice Cream Licens 



36,746.66 

770.00 

140.00 

128.00 

2.00 

20.00 

3,300.00 

216.00 

10.00 

6,500.00 

698.00 

2,956.00 

500.00 

40.00 

e 69.50 



Licenses and Permits (Cont.): 
Health & Sanitation (Cont.): 

Sewer Installers Permit 

Cesspool Pumping Permits 

Restaurant Licenses 

Cesspool Pit Fee 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 
Public Works: 

Street Opening Permits 



Fines and Forfeits 

Grants & Gifts: 
Federal: 

NDEA Title III 
Public Law 874 
ESEA Title I 
ESEA Title II 
ESEA title VI 
Cafeteria Non Food 
Revenue Sharing 



130. 


,00 




3, 


,00 




52. 


,50 




703. 


,00 




1,913. 


,50 




492. 


,50 




195. 


,00 




55,585. 


66 



4,509.50 



1,390.25 
6,658.00 
8,230.00 
3,279.05 
4,493.00 
18,582.15 
137,640.00 
148,134.70 
10,718.00 



Federal WPC 

Storm Disaster O.E.P. 

H.U.D. Historic Commissio n 6,454.87 

345,580.02 



State: 

School Transportation 
Vocational Education 
School Construction 
Regional School District 
Tuition & Transportation 
Water Pollution Control 
Library Aid 
School Lunch 
Shellfish Reimbusement 
Youth Commission 
Veterans 

Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 58 Highway Aid 



County: 

Dog Account Refund 
Aid to Highways 



Other: 

Chamber of Commerce 
Manning Fund 



107,170.88 

2,533.00 

12,953.27 

63,960,17 

15,761.00 

3,570.00 

4,031.25 

33,241.63 

600.00 

14,886.62 

78,159.07 

26,531.98 

50,515.26 

413,914.13 



1,590.28 
12,530.75 
14,121.03 



675.30 
1,228.32 
1,903.62 



13 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



Special Assessments: 

Unapportioned Sewer 1971 

1972 
Sewer Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 
Apportioned Paid in Advance 



Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1962 
Levy of 1966 
Levy of 1967 
Levy of 1968 
Levy of 1969 
Levy of 1970 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 



Departmental: 

General Government: 
Selectmen: 

Sale of Booklets 

Liquor I.D. 
Accountant : 

Payroll Processing 

Casualty Insurance 

Workmens Compensation 

County Retirement 

Group Insurance 
Treasurer: 

Costs-Taxes 

Costs-MVE 

Tax Certificates 
Town Clerk: 

Recording 

Marriage Intentions 

Certified Copies 

All Other 
Planning Board: 

Outside Inspections 

Other 
Appeals Board 
Town Rentals 



Public Safety: 
Police 

Photo copies 
Bicycle Registrations 
Firearm Identification 
Application to sell Firearms 



Public Safety: (Cont.) 



49.82 


Forestry 


4,293.50 




8,538.52 


Sealer of Weights 


193.00 








6,452. 


25 


135.97 








424.44 


Health & Sanitation: 






12,064.17 


Rabies Clinic 


369.50 




11,381.03 


Sewer Connection Fees 


1,030.00 




32,593.95 


Sewer Rental 

Sewer Rental Liens: 


18,880.18 






Levy of 1970 


667.32 




75.10 


Levy of 1971 


519.23 




221.65 


Levy of 1972 


1,409.91 




369.33 




22,876. 


14 


576.07 








284.43 


Highways: 






1,351.41 


General 


1,005.23 




57,087.65 


Highway Machinery 


311.04 




186,484.21 




1,316. 


27 


246,449.85 


Schools: 








Tuition 


6,580.00 






Drivers Education 


1,000.00 






Adult Education 


8,778.20 




1.50 


Lost Books 


62.20 




10.00 


Miscellaneous 


1,140.71 






Feoffees of Grammar Schools 


7,500.00 




327.96 


School Lunch 


166,033.44 




25,821.92 


Athletic Receipts 


10,521.46 




24,697.80 




201,616. 


01 


40,014.96 








2,137.82 


Recreation: 








Swimming Instruction 


379.00 




389.00 


Beach Stickers 


2,130.75 




1,675.00 


Lighthouse Use 


540.00 




1,644.00 




3,049. 


75 


1,734.16 


Public Service Enterprise: 






226.00 


Electric: 






437.00 


Rates & Services 1 


,308,896.26 




366.42 


Water: 








Rates & Services 


192,505.92 




732.00 


Liens: 






42.00 


Levy of 1970 


471.85 




456.00 


Levy of 1971 


2,123.52 




4,708.82 


Levy of 1972 


12,257.56 




105,422.36 


Cemeteries: 


1,516,255. 


11 


1,228.00 


Sale of Lots 


2,350.00 




477.75 


Care of Lots-Annual 


733.50 




74.00 


Openings 


6,760.00 




106.00 


Foundations 


1,243.87 




is 80.00 


Tents 


855.00 





14 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



Cemeteries: (Cont.) 

Liners 760.00 

Miscellaneous 10.00 
Transfer from Trust Funds: 

Perpetual c^e 7,000.00 

Flower Fund 300.00 





20,012.37 


Interest: 




General Revenue: 




Taxes 


11,065.83 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


1,573.02 


Investments 


6,122.69 


Sewer 


7,465.85 


Electric Revenue: 




Meter Deposit 


598.35 


Depreciation 


1,042.55 


Trust Funds: 




Rehabilitation 


59.90 


John C. Kimball 


29.00 


Mrs. Wm. G. Brown 


174.11 


Mar i anna T. Jones 


82.80 


Richard T. Crane 


4,021.78 


Eunice C. Cowles 


371.85 


Mark Newman 


332.90 


Martha I. Savory 


31.04 


Dow Boulder 


14.43 


Apple ton Memorial Fountain 


57.46 


Hannah Clark 


11.50 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


6,474.33 


Flower Fund 


215.97 


Investments: 




Stabilization Fund 


4,159.59 


Conservation Fund 


927.40 



44,832.35 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 

Loan 2,000,000.00 

Anticipation of Serial Issue 440,000.00 
Serial Loan: 

Storm Disaster 

Payne School Repairs 

Sewer Construction 

Fire Equipment 
Premium 



11,500.00 
40,000.00 
400,000.00 
60,000.00 
435.16 
2,951,935.16 



Agency Trust and Investments: 
Agency: 

Dog Licenses 
Bond Deposits 
Electric Meter Deposit 
Tailings 



2,224.45 

20,000.00 

5,117.00 

2,562.51 



Agency Trust and Investments: 
Agency: 

Payroll Deductions: 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
Health Insurance 
Life Insurance 
Retirement 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Other Deductions 
Trust: 

Perpetual Care Bequests 
Flower Fund Bequests 



(Cont.) 



107,677.26 
29,322.11 
57,423.67 
1,908.91 
35,508.95 
18,780.40 
10,585.81 

4,445.00 
1,300.00 



Eunice C. Cowles Scholarship 600.00 



R.T. Crane Picnic Reimb. 
Transfer of Trust Funds 
Investments: 
Revenue Cash 



Veterans Recovery 

Refunds: 

General Government 

Public Safety 

Health & Sanitation 

Public Works 

Veterans 

Schools 

Library 

Recreation 

Insurance 

Electric 

Water 

Other 



Unclassified: 

Damage Reimbursement 
Recycling Receipts 



Total Receipts 



3,125.38 
674,511.21 

900,000.00 
1,875,092.66 

25.00 



5,895 


.45 




2,086 


.92 




475 


.00 




1,483 


.31 




1,043. 


.45 




2,739, 


.07 




7 


.80 




46. 


.28 




19,511 


.09 




8,665 


.03 




2,770, 


.18 




119. 


.70 




44,843. 


28 


3, 


.00 




558, 


60 




561. 


60 


12.346.1 


L22. 


86 



Source: Town Accountant 



15 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



Departmental Expenditures 

Public Service Enterprises: 
Electric: 
Operation 
Construction 
Depreciation 
Bonds Proceeds 

Water: 

Operation 
Construction 1971 
Plant & Investment 



Municipal Indebtedness: 
Maturing Debt: 

General 

Public Service Enterprise 
Interest on Maturing Debt: 

Public Service 

General 
Loans Anticipation-Revenue 2 
Loans Anticipation-Serial I 
Interest-Anticipation Loans 



5,662,099.28 



,119,726.34 
5,859.46 

99,958.38 
9,970.83 

1,235,515.01 

110,725.23 
23,259.91 
16,112.33 
150,097.47 



338,000.00 
126,000.00 

31,739.50 

49,819.00 

,000,000.00 

440,000.00 

25,055.64 



State & County Requirements: 
State Parks 

Metropolitan Air Pollution 
Metropolitan Planning Counci 
Shellfish Purification 
Mosquito Control 
Ipswich River Watershed 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
State Assessment 
Audit of Accounts 
County Tax 



Court Judgment 

Agency: 

Dog License Coll for County 

Tailings 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

County Retirement 

Group Insurance 

O.M.E. Deduction 

Life Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Clothing Allowance Deduction 

Bond Deposit 

Savings Bond Deduction 

Union Dues 



3,010,614.14 

19,771.48 

378.46 

537.50 

1,088.03 

14,903.19 

62.54 

1,150.35 

430.00 

13,777.35 

113,075.44 

165,174.34 

4,161.60 



2,224.45 

238.90 

107,677.26 

19,415.72 

30,109.78 

55,257.18 

1,141.53 

1,946.66 

19,610.83 

1,833.33 

500.00 

2,111.47 

6,413.30 

248,480.41 



Trust: 

Cemetery: 

Perpetual Care Bequests 

Perpetual Care Income 

Flower Fund Bequest 

Flower Fund Income 
Conservation 
Manning 
Stabilization 
Other Trust Funds: 

Mr 8. Wm. B. Brown 

Eunice Caldwell Cowles 

John C. Kimball 

Marianna T. Jones 

R. T. Crane Jr. 

R. T. Crane Picnic Expense 

Mark Newman 

Martha Savory 

Dow Boulder 

Appleton Memorial Fountain 

Hannah Clark 

Rehabilitation 



4,440.00 

6,097.04 

1,300.00 

215.97 

14,093.49 

930.57 

38,159.59 

174.11 

971.85 

274.23 

82.80 

4,021.78 

3,125.38 

332.90 

31.04 

14.43 

57.46 

23.00 

59.90 





74,405.54 


Transfer Funds 




to Arlington Trust 


671,171.14 


Veterans District 


10,290.72 


Investment: 




Certificate of Deposit: 




Revenue 


400,000.00 


Non Revenue 


48,000.00 


Federal Revenue Sharing 




Funds Invested 


137,640.00 



Refunds: 

Cash Advance-Payrolls 

Cash Advance -Workmens Comp. 

Tnti 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Electric Accounts Receivabl 

Water Accounts Receivables 

Water Liens 

Sewer Liens 

Sewer Betterment 

Committed Interest 

Building Permits 

PL 874 

Meter Deposits 

Blue Cross 

Total Payments 



585,640.00 

5,401.09 

231.00 

22,047.82 

5,973.25 

471.51 

188.30 

368.90 

335.23 

2,905.69 

343.25 

96.00 

165.00 

16,544.81 

35.61 



55,107.46 



11.872.757.11 



Source: Town Accountant 



16 





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22 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
MODERATOR 
Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
Salaries 
Administration 

SELECTMEN 
Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Adminis tr at ion 

To Revenue 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 



RESERVE FUND (Cont. ) 
To Overlay Surplus 638 



.59 



25,000.00 



125.00 
125.00 

100.00 

25.00 

125.00 



8,936.00 

40.00 

8,976.00 

6,390.12 
2,544.88 
8,935.00 
41.00 
8,976.00 



1,000.00 

34.00 

1,034.00 



100.00 
889.00 
989.00 



PLANNING BOARD 



Available: 

Appropriation 



12,330.00 
12,330.00 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 
Capital Outlay 
Typewriter 



500 
3,715 



.00 
.73 



99.50 



Encumbered 
To Revenue 



4,315 

7,809 

205 



.23 
.15 
.62 



12,330 
ELECTION & REGISTRATION 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Administration 

Encumbered 

To Overlay Surplus 



APPEALS BOARD 



To Revenue 


11.00 


Available: 


To Overlay Surplus 


34.00 


Appropriation 




1,034.00 


Transfer-Reserve Fund 


RESERVE FUND 






Available: 




Expenditures: 


Appropriation 


25,000.00 


Salaries & Wages 




25,000.00 


Administration 


Transfers: 






Selectmen 


40.00 


To Overlay Surplus 


Finance Committee 


34.00 




Election & Registration 


2,828.73 


TOWN MANAGER 


Appeals Board 


90.00 


Available: 


Health Insurance 


1,200.00 


Appropriation 


Town Clerk 


394.00 




Conservation Commission 


200.00 


Expenditures: 


Fire Department 


9,633.00 


Salaries & Wages 


Health 


767.50 


Adminis trat ion 


Equipment Maintenance 


1,664.83 


Capital Outlay-Equipment 


Snow & Ice Control 


5,489.75 




Forestry 


700.00 


Encumbered 


Cemeteries 


350.00 


To Revenue 


Farley Brook Repiping 


969.60 
24,361.41 





12,400 
2,828 



.00 



.00 
.73 



15,228.73 



10,566 
3,800 



.12 
.05 



14,366 

797 

64 



.17 
.61 
.95 



15,228.73 



275. 


00 


90. 


00 


365. 


00 


190. 


00 


163. 


42 


353, 


42 


11. 


58 


365. 


00 


48,230. 


00 



48,230.00 



31,702 

13,579 

280 



.80 
.66 
.25 



45,562 

100 

2,567 



.71 
.00 
.29 



48,230.00 



23 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



INSURANCE 




TREASURER 


-COLLECTOR (Cont.) 


Available: 




Expenditures: 






Appropriation 


70,670.00 


Salaries & Wages 




27,762.44 




70,670.00 


Administration 




3,633.27 


Expenditures: 




Capital Outlay-Adder 




250.00 


Package 


36,441.11 






31,645.71 


Public Official Bond 


616.00 


To Revenue 




668.29 


Workmen's Compensation 


26,398.00 






32,314.00 




63,455.11 


ASSES 




To Revenue 


7,214.89 


Available: 








70,670.00 


Appropriation 




26,360.00 


EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 








26,360.00 


Available: 




Expenditures: 






Appropriation 


220,720.00 


Salaries & Wages 




22,691.63 


Transfer-Reserve Fund 


1,200.00 
221,920.00 


Administration 




2,831.43 
25,523.06 


Expenditures: 




To Revenue 




836.94 


County Retirement 


166,719.08 






26,360.00 


Health-Life Insurance 


45,739.77 


TOWN 


CLERK 




Military Service Credits 


8,348.12 


Available: 








220,806.97 


Appropriation 




12,216.00 


To Overlay Surplus 


460.23 


Transfer-Reserve Fund 


1 


394.00 


To Revenue 


652.80 
221,920.00 


Expenditures: 




12,610.00 


DEBT SERVICE 




Salaries & Wages 




11,515.37 


Available: 




Administration 




844.08 


Appropriation 


422,819.00 






12,359.45 




422,819.00 


To Overlay Surplus 




214.92 


Expenditures: 




To Revenue 




35.63 


Payment of Principal 


338,000.00 






12,610.00 


Payment of Interest 


49,819.00 


LEGAL 




Interest on Tax Anticipation 25,055.64 


Available: 






Bond Issue Expense 


2,445.25 
415,319.89 


Appropriation 




11,278.00 
11,278.00 


To Revenue 


7,499.11 


Expenditures: 








422,819.00 


Salaries & Wages 




10,900.50 


ACCOUNTING 




Administration 




176.85 


Available: 








11,077.35 


Appropriation 


33,004.00 
33,004.00 


To Revenue 




200.65 
11,278.00 


Expenditures: 




INDUSTRIAL 


COMMISSIO 


Salaries & Wages 


24,885.96 


Available: 






Administration 


6,163.48 


Appropriation 




550.00 


Capital Outlay 








550.00 


Air Conditioner 


244.25 


Expenditures: 








31,293.69 


Salaries & Wages 




75.00 


Encumbered 


1,000.00 


Administration 




52.75 


To Revenue 


710.31 






127.75 




33,004.00 


To Revenue 




422.25 


TREASURER-COLLECTOR 








550.00 


Available: 




HISTORICAL 


COMMISSI 


Appropriation 


32,314.00 


Available: 








32,314.00 


Appropriation 




300.00 



300.00 



24 



DETAILED STATEMENT 
For the Year Ending 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION (Cont. ) 
Expenditures: 
Administration 



To Revenue 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Out lay- Appraisal 

Balance to Conservation Fund 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 
Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 
To Revenue 

IPSWICH YOUTH COMMISSION 
Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Sound System 



77.28 

77.28 

222.72 

300.00 



3,250.00 

200.00 

3,450.00 

391.08 

434.09 

575.00 

1,400.17 

2,049.83 

3,450.00 



225.00 
225.00 

225.00 
225.00 



7 ? 718.00 
7,718.00 

1,375.00 
4,319.25 



1,297.00 
6,991.25 

To Revenue 726. 75 

7,718.00 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



POLICE 
Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Patrol Wagon 

Radio Equip. 

Revolvers 

Typewriter 

Chair 

File Cabinets 

Photo Equipment 

Encumbered 
Balance to 1973 



221,266.00 
221,266.00 

200,839.14 
11,155.73 

6,977.95 

998.00 

592.50 

222.30 

115.60 

62.05 

298.78 

221,262.05 

162.75 

(223.14) 



OF EXPENDITURES 
December 31, 1972 

POLICE (Cqnt.) 
Expenditures: 
To Revenue 



64.34 



221,266.00 



FIRE 
Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

New Hose 

Fire Alarm Extension 

Boat 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



186 
9 



069.00 
633.00 



195,702.00 



181 
11 



895.00 
132.80 

998.00 
599.90 
357.00 



194. 



982.70 
180.00 
539.30 



195,702.00 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Available: 

Appropriation 



Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay-Equimnent 
Auxiliary Police Equipment 
Auxiliary Fire Equipment 
E. 0. Center 

Encumbered 
To Revenue 



575.00 
575.00 

000.00 
009.10 

498.88 

88.70 

600.63 

3,197.31 

1,296.65 

81.04 

4,575.00 



SHELLFISH & HARBORS 



Available: 

Appropriation 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

To Revenue 



15,012.00 
15,012.00 



14, 



386.97 
483.27 



870.24 
141.76 



15,012.00 



HEALTH 



Available: 

Appropriation 
Transfer-Reserve Fund 

Expenditures: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Encumbered 

To Overlay Surplus 



23, 



910.00 
767.50 



24,677.50 



14 
9 



529.75 
200.70 



23, 



730.45 
140.00 
717.75 



25 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



HEALTH 1 


[Cont.) 




TOWN HALL BUILDING (C 


ont.) 


Expenditures: 






Expenditures: 








To Revenue 




89.30 
24,677.50 


Capital Outlay 
Cellblock 






6,319.44 


OUTSIDE CONTRACT 


Buffing Machine 




498.65 


Available: 












19,389.51 


Appropriation 




114,000.00 
114,000.00 


To Revenue 






191.49 
19,581.00 


Expenditures: 






MEMC 


BUILDING 




Rubbish Collection 


52,000.00 


Available: 








Garbage Collection 


2 7,000.00 


Appropriation 






2,975.00 


Dump Maintenance 




34,149.60 
113,149.60 


Expenditures: 






2,975.00 


To Revenue 




850.40 
114,000.00 


Expenses 
To Revenue 






2,566.12 
408.88 


VETERANS 


SERVICES 










2,975.00 


Available: 








SEWER 


PLANT 




Appropriation 




146,000.00 
146,000.00 


Available: 

Appropriation 






500.00 


Expenditures : 












500.00 


Cash 




47,529.08 


Expenditures: 








Medical 




63,910.26 


Expense 8 






479.11 


Groceries 




3,798.12 


To Revenue 






20.89 


Fuel 




3,042.69 








500.00 


Burial 




175.50 
118,455.65 


Available: 


FIRE ! 


STATION 




To 1973 




27,544.35 
146,000.00 


Appropriation 






3,215.00 
3,215.00 


PUBLIC WORKS ADMIN 5TRATI0 


Expenditures: 








Available: 






Expenses 






2,119.65 


Appropriation 




13,894.00 


Capital Outlay 












13,894.00 


Vacuum Cleaner 




119.95 


Expenditures: 






Linoleum 






170.00 


Salaries & Wages 




11,924.00 


Weather Stripping 




110.00 


Expenses 




1,470.24 
13,394.24 


To Revenue 






2,519.60 
695.40 


To Revenue 




499.76 
13,894.00 




TOWN 1 


3ARAGE 


3,215.00 


BUILDING : 


INSPECTOR 




Available: 








Available: 






Appropriation 






2,200.00 


Appropriation 




7,560.00 
7,560.00 


Expenditures: 






2,200.00 


Expenditures: 






Expenses 






2,189.84 


Salaries & Wages 




4,286.70 


To Revenue 






10.16 


Expenses 




591.43 








2,200.00 






4,878.13 


CEMI 


BUILDING 




To Revenue 




2,681.87 
7,560.00 


Available: 

Appropriation 






595.00 


TOWN HALL 


BUILDING 










595.00 


Available: 






Expenditures: 








Appropriation 




19,581.00 
19,581.00 


Expense 8 
To Revenue 






259.72 
335.28 


Expenditures: 












595.00 


Salaries 




6,531.00 


] 


PARK BUI 




Expenses 




6,040.42 


Available: 

Appropriation 






3.320.00 



3,320.00 



26 



DE' 


rAILED STATEMENT 


OF EXPENDITURES 






For 


the Year Ending 


December 31, 1972 






PARK BUILDING (Cont.) 




SNOW & ICE CONTROL 


(Cont.) 


Expenditures: 




Expenditures: 






Expenses 


3,022.23 


Equipment 




14,418.25 


To Revenue 


297.77 






53,060.14 




3,320.00 


To 1973 




(4,570.39) 


LIBRARY BUILDING 








48,489.75 


Available: 






FORESTRY 




Appropriation 


6,025.00 


Available: 








6,025.00 


Appropriation 




49,896.00 


Expenditures: 




Trans f er-Reserve 


Fund 


700.00 


Expenses 


1,962.95 






50,596.00 


Capital Outlay 




Expenditures: 






New Lighting 


320.25 


Salaries & Wages 




35,122.39 


Child. Room Renov. 


680.00 


Expenses 




14,214.16 


Alarm System 


470.00 


Capital Outlay 






Stair Treads 


189.50 
3,622.70 


Saw 




599.90 
49,936.45 


Encumbered 


1,949.75 


To Revenue 




659.55 


To Revenue 


452.55 






50,596.00 




6,025.00 


RECREATION & PARKS 


HIGHWAY 




Available: 






Available: 




Appropriation 




67,599.00 


Appropriation 


179,857.00 
179,857.00 


Expenditures: 




67,599.00 


Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 




46,444.06 


Salaries & Wages 


67,916.00 


Expenses 




14,363.79 


Expenses 


90,416.58 


Capital Outlay 






Capital Outlay 




Playground Equ: 


Lpment 


883.06 


Truck 


15,119.58 


Park Benches 




296.45 


Walters Snow Plow 


2,994.27 


Finger Piers 




390.00 


Desk 


35.00 


Neck Causeway 




345.00 




176,481.43 


Great Neck 




1,115.34 


To Revenue 


3,375.57 


Playground 




277.30 




179,857.00 


Portable Bleacl 


lers 


835.00 


EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 




Fencing-Casali 




195.00 


Available: 








65,145.00 


Appropriation 


48,967.00 


Encumbered 




799.66 


Transfer-Reserve Fund 


1,664.83 
50,631.83 


To Revenue 




1,654.34 
67,599.00 


Expenditures: 




CEMETERIES 




Salaries & Wages 


16,099.91 


Available: 






Expenses 


36,497.98 


Appropriation 




56,343.00 


Capital Outlay 




Trans f er-Reserve 


Fund 


350.00 


Jack 


564.45 






56,693.00 


Tester 


198.15 


Expenditures: 








53,360.49 


Salaries & Wages 




39,102.22 


Encumbered 


300.00 


Expenses 




9,544.58 


To 1973 


(3,483.15) 


Capital Outlay 






To Revenue 


454.49 


Bunting Mowers 




1,492.00 




50,631.83 


Sweeper 




403.00 


SNOW & ICE CONTROL 




Hot Top Avenues 


3,024.69 


Available: 


53,566.49 


Appropriation 


43,000.00 


To Revenue 




3,126.51 


Transfer-reserve Fund 


5,489.75 






56,693.00 




48,489.75 


EDUCATION 




Expenditures: 




Available: 






Salaries & Wages 


18,025.87 


Appropriation 


2 


,759,332.00 


Expenses 


20,616.02 




2 


,759,332.00 



27 



DETAILED STATEMENT 
For the Year Ending 
EDUCATION (Cont.) 
Expenditures: 



Administration 


70,881.50 


Instruction 2 


,017,300.49 


Other School Service 


311,440.01 


Operation & Maintenance 


251,153.51 


Fixed Charges 


36,631.90 


Acquisition of Fixed Assets 


32,206.25 


Programs with Other Districts 5,658.40 


2 


,725,2 72.06 


Encumbered 


18,267.93 


To Revenue 


15,792.01 


2 


,759,332.00 


LIBRARY 




Available: 




Appropriation 


61,643.00 




61,643.00 


Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 


45,163.44 


Expenses 


14,489.27 




59,652.71 


To Revenue 


1,990.29 




61,643.00 


SEWER OPERATING 




Available: 




Appropriation 


31,729.00 




31,729.00 


Expenditures: 




Salaries & Wages 


17,517.33 


Expenses 


8,422.65 




25,939.98 


Encumbered 


225.00 


To Revenue 


5,564.02 




31,729.00 


SPECIAL ARTICLES /CAPITAL OUTLAY 


Available: 




Balance 


204,627.17 


Appropriation 


311,6 92.55 


Transfer-Reserve Fund 


969.60 


Federal Grant 


158,852.70 


Recap Tax Rate 


5,000.00 


Bond Issue 


511,500.00 


1 


,192,642.02 


Expenditures: 




Tax Title Foreclosure 


1,960.00 


Comprehensive Plan 


9,508.17 


Whittier Vocational 


60,725.00 


Land Purchase-Conservation 


34,500.00 


Farley Brook Easement 


400.00 


Town Hall Improvement 


1,340.70 


Ipswich Promotion 


700.00 


Stabilization (transfer) 


34,000.00 


Unpaid Bills 


1,090.40 


Chapter 90 Maintenance 


4,351.38 



Highway L & S 
Lafayette Street 

Putnam Road 
Wayne Avenue 



OF EXPENDITURES 
December 31, 1972 

SPECIAL ARTICLES /CAPITAL OUTLAY (Cont.) 
Expenditures: 

Farragut Road 

Storm Drains 

High Street Drain 

Spring Street Drain 
Farley Brook Repiping 
Sewer Easements 
Sewer Construction-1970 
Sewer Construction-1971 
Sewer Construction- 1972 
Storm Di8aster-1972 
Recreation L & S 

Daniel Boone Park 

Hot Top Linebrook 
School Building Needs 
Purchase of Bleachers 
Payne School Renovations 
School Building Needs Comm 



Encumbered 
To 1973 
To Revenue 



1,597.28 

344.60 

1,736.70 

2,121.00 

40,950.60 

990.00 

4,622.03 

140,700.25 

453,057.58 

18,499.90 

454.60 

150.00 

5,000.00 

8,339.00 

46,827.88 

157.25 

877,808.64 

439.85 

280,983.98 

33,409.55 

1,192,642.02 

ENCUMBRANCES 

Available: 

Balance 43,206.05 

Appropriation 23,471.56 

Transfer from Surplus Revenue 438.00 

67,115.61 
Expenditures: 

Selectmen 83.15 

Planning Board 2,145.61 

Election & Registration 140.00 
Town Manager 365.00 

Accountant 298.40 

Treasurer 38.55 

Town Clerk 507.90 

Police 82.20 

Veterans 648.50 

Highway 870.29 

Snow & Ice 1,381.97 

Education-1971 50,409.33 

Sewer Operating 300.00 

57,270.90 
4,893.30 
2,200.00 
2,751.41 
67,115.61 



Encumbered 
To 1973 
To Revenue 



2,735.32 

920.50 
28.50 



Source: Town Accountant 



28 



COMPARATIVE TAX STRUCTURE STATEMENT 



IPSWICH BCaRD of assessors 



A. Town 

B. County Tax & Assessments 

C. State Tax & Assessments 

D. Overlay 

E. Gross amount to be raised 

F. Estimated receipts & available funds 

G. Net amount to be raised by taxation 
H. Total value- Personal Property 

Total value- Real Estate 

Total value- Taxable Property 

Tax rate per thousand 

Total raised on Personal Property 

Total raised on Real Estate 
I. Total taxes levied on Property 
J, Items collectable not effecting rate 

Sewer added to taxes 

Water liens added to tax bs 
K. Total amount to be collected 



5,353 

105 

42 

141 

5,643 

2,027 

3,615 

1,659 

62,910 

64,570 

92 
3,522 
3,615 

20 

11 

3,647 



1971 
786.79 
843.36 
582.65 
347.75 
560.55 
640.24 
920.31 
631.00 
416.00 
047.00 
56.00 
939.33 
980.98 
920.31 

363.66 
596.94 
880.91 



5,625 

107 

56 

223 

6,012 

2,288 

3,724 

1,668 

64,836 

66,505 

93 
3,630 
3,724 

21 

14 

3,760 



1972 
075.77 
795.32 
894.64 
141.88 
907.61 
627.22 
280.39 
759.00 
248.00 
047.00 
56.00 
450.50 
829.89 
280.39 

226.18 
383.35 
267.63 



29 



DATE OF ISSUE 


PURPOSE 


1955 


School Project Loan 


1955 


School Project Loan 


1956 


Electric 


1956 


Water 


1958 


Sewerage Loan 


1959 


Electric 


1961 


Water 


1961 


Sewer 


1961 


Electric 


1963 


Sewer 


1963 


School Project Loan 


196U 


Water Storage Loan 


196U 


Sewer 


1961* 


Water 


196I4 


School Project Loan 


1965 


Sewer 


1966 


Sewer 


1968 


Sewer 


1968 


Water 


1969 


Reservoir 


1969 


Sewer Bonds 


1969 


1 T ater 


1969 


Electric 


1970 


Sewer 


1970 


1T ater 


1971 


Water 


1972 


Sewer 


1972 


Remodeling 


1972 


Fire Equipment 



STATEMENT OF MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
GEORGE C. M0URIKA5, TREASURER 

DATE OF MATURITY 



BALANCE 
DEC. 31, 1972 



October 1, 1975 
October 1, 1975 
December 1, 1975 
September 1, 1975 
October 1, 1987 
June 1, 1978 
November 1, 1976 
November 1, 1976 
July 15, 1975 
November 1, 1973 
August 15, 1973 
February 15, 197U 
May 15, 1975 
May 15, 1979 
August 1, 197U 
December 1, 1975 
August 1, 1976 
August 1, 1978 
August 1, 1978 
August 15, 1977 
August 15, 197h 
August 15, 19 8U 
August 15, 1989 
September 1, 1975 
September 1, 1975 
July 15, 1981 
July 15, 1982 
July 15, 1976 
September 1, 1975 

TOTAL: $ 2,090,000 



60,000 
30,000 
25,000 
15,000 

300,000 
36,000 
60,000 
20,000 
30,000 
1,000 
3,000 
10,000 
111, 000 
70,000 
98,000 
30,000 
93,000 
65,000 

120,000 
25,000 
15,000 
75,000 

180,000 
60,000 

35,000 
120,000 
U00,000 

1*0,000 

60,000 



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32 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Trust Funds - 1972 














Book 


Market 


Lower of 


1972 




Fund 


Value 


Value 


Cost or Market 


Income 




Treadwell 


$23,178 


$li7,787 


$21,551 


$ 1,1*56 




Heard 


10,058 


22,131 


8,960 


739 




Lathrop 


1,855 


1,855 


1,855 


105 




Spiller 


1,812 


1,592 


1,592 


86 




Newman 


5,327 


5,H*2 


5,11*2 


260 




Building 


19,173 


19,07k 


19,071* 


1,062 




Memorial Book 


795 


795 


795 


39 




Wales Endowment 


270 


270 


270 


15 




Total 1972 


$62,768 


$98,61;6 


$59,239 


$ 3,762 




Total 1971 


62,373 


91,292 


58,923 


3,377 




Increase (Decrease) 


$ 395 


$ 7,351* 


$ 316 


$ 385 




Operating Statement - 


1972 










Income 












Town Appropriation 








$59,661 




Books Lost or Sold 








310 




Donations 








359 




Fines 








1,100 




Photocopy 








76U 




Trust Funds 








3,762 




Kimball Fund 








21*5 


$66,201 


Expenditures 




Library Fds 


. Town Fds. 


Total 




Salaries & Wages 






$1*5,167 


$1*5,167 




Telephone 






1*19 


1*19 




Postage 






U32 


U32 




Training 




$ 11*1 




11*1 




Dues, Meetings, Travel 


17 


258 


275 




Maintenance 




200 


171 


371 




Supplies 




5 


1,526 


1,531 




Books 




U,602 


10,51*1 


15, 11*3 




Periodicals 




15 


1,072 


1,087 




Records 




93 




93 




Equipment 




Hi7 


75 


222 




Financial Service 




186 




186 




Building Expansion Plans 


2,5UU 




2,5U* 




Total Expenditures 




$ 7,950 


$59,661 




67,611 


Net Deficit 








• 


$ 1,U10 


DWtarg 






D. VJ 


r. POOR, Jr. 


1-30-73 






Treasurer 





33 



TRUSTEES OF MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 
WILLIAM H. BURNHAM, JR., DONALD F. WHISTON, AND DAVID C. WILLIAMS, SR. 

MANNING SCHOOL FUNDS 

January 1, 1972 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $50,769.53 

Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-op Bank 2,296.72 

$78,256.55 
Income from Interest and Dividends: 5,074. 8< 



Less Disbursements t 

Rental of Safe Deposit Box $ 5.00 

Supplies for Ipswich High School $1,228.32 



$83,331 



# 



$82,098.12 



ASSETS IN FUNDS 

December 31 , 1972 

Balance in Account #14293, Ipswich Savings Bank $50,769.53 

Balance in Account # 7884, Ipswich Savings Bank 25,190.30 

Balance in Account # 1995, Ipswich Co-op Bank 6,138.29 

$82,098.12 



SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 

138 Shares, First National Bank of Boston $2,998.20 
20 Shares, Ipswich Cooperative Bank 4,000.00 



6,998.20 



$89,096.32 
David C. Williams, Treasurer 



34 



Feoffees of the Grammar School 



1972 Report 



Financial Statement 



Balance January 1, 1972 
Gash received 1972 

Expenditures 1972 

Deposit in transit 
Balance December 31, 1972 



« 5,565.74 

101,818.67 

107,354.41 

102,134.01 

5,250.40 

834 . 74 

4,415,66 



Little ^eck (Land only) valued at 
Store Building 
Barn 
Wharf 

Cash in First Nat'l Bank, Ipswich 
On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 
Interest 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 
Farm Account 
Interest 

On deposit Ipswich Savings Bank 
Special Notice Account 
Interest 

On deposit Ipswich Oo-op. Bank 
Interest and Dividends 



234 Sh. 1st Nat'l Boston Corp. 
140 Sh. Shawmut Ass'n Corp. 
Ipswich Co-op Bank ■t'aid-up 
Certificate 



Cost 

2748.18 
2748.63 



$97, 500.00 
4,600.00 
1,090.00 
1,019.00 
4,4-13.66 
2,638.49 

220 - Q1 2,858.50 

4,837.66 
■ &? 9 ? 1 5,144.97 



2,920.40 
164.24 



3,084.64 



5,782.69 

— 22±l2£ 6?177#01 

Value 

10,588.50 
7,490.00 



2000 . 00 2,000.00 



'20,078.50 
$145,968.28 



87,500 was given to the Town for support of schools. 
The following taxes were paid to the Town of Ipswich: 



Land 

Store 

Barn 

Wharf 

Cottages 



Assessed Value 
ti it 



n 



it 



n 
it 
it 



97,500.00 

4,600.00 

1,090.00 

1,019.00 

1,084,540.00 

1,188,749.00 



5,460.00 

257.60 

61.04 

57.06 

60,734.24 

66,569.94 




Z^ 



7)~ 



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35 



Feofi'ees of the virammar ^chool 



1972 Heport 



Exhibit A 



Reconciliation of Cash Balance 

Balance, January 1, 1972 
Cash Receipts, Schedule I 

Expenditures 1972 

Deposit in transit 
Balance December 31, 1972 



December 31. 1972 



» 5,565.7* 
101.816.67 
107,384.41 

102.134.01 
5,250.40 



834.74 
4,41^.66 



Outstanding Accounts 
December 31, 1972 



1970 
1971 
1972 



100.00 

2,904.91 

7.044.68 

10,049.59 



Sche dule I 

Cash Receipts 
January 1 - December 31, 1972 



Collections: 



Rent and Land Charges 

Taxes 

Interest 

Transferred: 

Ipswich Sayings Bank 

Miscellaneous Payments : 

Dividends : 

First National Boston Con • 
Shawraut Association, Inc. 



23,389.04 
60,031.31 
?53-?l 



358.02 
420.00 



«83,774.06 

17,000.00 
266.59 

778.02 
1101,818.67 



Scheaule II 

Expend tures 
ry 1 - December 31, 1972 



Taxes : 

Town of Ipswich 

liens 
Collector of Internal Revenue 


»66,56 c ■ 
229.85 
69.00 


$66,868.79 


Donations: 

Town of Ipswich support of schools 7,500.00 

First Church Memory of Charles Goodhue 50.00 


7,550.00 


Repairs: 

Roads 

Parking Lot 

Wharf (Float) 

Trees and Brush work 

Barn 




915.05 

501.00 

1,099.00 

464.00 

51.04 


3,030.09 


Playgrounds: 






125.00 


New Work: 
Catch Basin 
Erosion Project 




475.10 
1.499.00 


1,974.10 


Police 

Town Officers 

Special Police 

Printing. (Tickets) 

Telephone 




648i00 

1,100.00 

22.54 

76.65 


1,847.19 


Salaries and Expenses: 

•Salaries 

Transportation 

Meetings 

Office Supplies 

Rental, Safe Deposit Box 




1,663.60 

600.00 

68.70 

121.48 

9.00 


2,462.78 


Insurance and Bond: 






610.80 


Deposited in Savings Ace 


'ts. 




17.665. 26 
102,13^.01 



36 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



123,695.65 

Customers Accounts Receivable: 
Supervision 4,121.91 

Meter Reading 7,951.67 

Records & Collections 34.772.86 

46,846.44 



Expenses : 




Sales: 




Generating: 




Residential 


678,411.25 


Operation, Supervision 




Home Heating 


45,910.21 


and Engineering 


13,292.00 


Apartment Heating 


47,372.05 


Fuel 


246,043.59 


Commercial 


208,215.32 


Generation Expense: 




Industrial 


189,934.43 


Labor 


96,065.89 


Commercial Heating 


1,466.77 


Lubricants 


10,868.66 


Street Lighting 


24,000.00 


Maintenance : 




Municipal Buildings 


44,082.89 


Supervision & Engineering 


12,013.95 


Private Area Lighting 


2,921.00 


Structures - Power 


2,045.45 


Sales for Resale 


168,467.29 


Generator & Elec. Equip, 


23,342.73 


Misc. Service Rev. 


345.00 


Misc. Other Expenses 


5.197.48 


Other Electric Rev. 


8.439.32 




408,869.75 




1,419,565.53 






Less Disc. & Abate. 


77.iaA.87 


Other Power Supply: 




Net Sales 


IL, 342, 450. 66 


Purchased Power 


388,485.27 


Other Income: 




Distribution : 




Interest : 




Overhead Trans. Lines 


894.38 


On Depreciation Fund 


1,042.55 


Overhead Lines Exp. 


141.00 


On Special Deposits 


631.86 


Underground Lines Exp. 


155.99 


Total Other Income 


1,674.41 


Meter Expenses 


11,275.71 






Maintenance : 








Supervision & Engineering 10,450.00 






Dist. Station Equip. 


3,547.14 






Overhead Lines 


82,212.35 






Underground Lines 


1,126.23 






Street Lighting 


4,189.00 






Misc. Expenses 


9.703.85 







Administrative & General: 
Salaries 

Office Supplies & Expense 
Outside Services 
Property Insurance: 

General 

Power 
Injuries & Damages: 

General 

Power 
Employees Pensions 
Maint. General Plant 
Transportation 
Depreciation 
Interest on Bonds 
Misc. General Expense 
Interest Refunds 



Total Expenses 
Net Profit 



26,976.46 

2,956.46 

13,972.38 

2,316.00 
7,026.96 

2,334.96 
1,909.92 

39,669.96 
3,255.10 

11,480.57 
108,327.24 

14,575.10 
6,275.56 
3.187t 32 



244,263.99 

1,232,161.10 

i3i.963.97 
1.344 .125.07 



1.344.125.07 



37 



ELECTRIC LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 31, 1972 



ASSETS 

Current As s ets ; 
Cash: 
Depreciation 
Construction 
Plant-Art. 10, ATM 1969 
Surplus 
Special Deposits 

Accounts Receivable 
Working Funds 
Inventory: 

Fuel Oil 

Lubricants 

Materials & Supplies 

Total Current Assets 
Fixed Assets: 



LIABILITIES & SURPLUS 



Land & Land Rights 

Power Structures 

Fuel Holders 

Prime Movers 

Generators 

Accessory Elec. Equip. 

Misc. Power Plant Equip. 

Land & Land Rights 

Land Clearing 

Trans. -Poles & Fixtures 

Trans . -Overhead Conduct ors 

Distrib.-Sta. Equip. 

Poles & Fixtures 

Overhead Conductors 

Underground Conduits 

Underground Conductors 

Line Trans. & Regulator 

Services 

Meters 

Meter Installations 

Street Lighting 

Outdoor Private Lighting 

General Structures 

Equipment : 

Office 

Transportation 

Shop 

Laboratory 

Communication 
Total Fixed Assets 
Less Reserve for Deprec. 



Total Assets 



14,513.20 

1.330.37 

237.04 

40,826.13 

7.189.00 

64,095.74 

140,567.05 

375.00 

17,452.05 

1,223.04 

40.714.98 

59.390.07 

264,427.86 



841.20 

115,366.15 

9,336.48 

1,115,411.68 

35,766.78 

91,679.31 

16,379.35 

17,706.60 

4,428.00 

42,584.49 

26,691.33 

701,567.39 

278,785.08 

325,929.12 

52,085.83 

80,310.72 

322,186.35 

47,348.42 

126,018.83 

1,291.48 

88,227.82 

4,057.27 
69,217.00 

25,161.49 

142,839.95 

10,240.84 

4,379.92 

6.437.86 

3,762,276.74 

1.^33.003.74 

2,279,273.00 

2.543.700.86 



Liabilities : 
Bonds Payable 
Customers 1 Deposits 
Interest Accrued 



Surplus: 
Loans Repayment 
Construction Contrib. 
Unappropriated Earned 
Surplus 



271,000.00 
7,189.00 
4,W,96 

282,702.96 



841,000.00 
10,978.06 

1.409.019.84 
2,260,997.90 



Total Liab. & Sur. 



2.543.700.86 



38 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1972 



EXPENSES: 




SALES: 


Operating: 




Metered 185,626.69 


Maintenance : 




Flat Rate 11,522.50 


Supply Structures 


106.15 


Sale of Supplies 5,597.27 


Reservoirs 


26.92 


Rent from Water Meters 3,300.00 


Pumping Station Supplies 


^,939.32 


Tap-In Charges 540.00 


Pumping Building 


1,438.40 


Application Charges 6,400.00 


Pumping Equipment 


239.12 


Misc. Non-Operating Income 3.250.45 


Inspection of Meters 


251.24 


Total Sales 216,236.91 


Mains 


18,720.42 




Standpipes 


-0- 


Less Discounts 945.56 


Services 


13,318.48 


Abatements 15 .830 .90 


Meters 


1,979.64 




Hydrants 


4,003.84 




Electricity Purchased 


8,376.92 




Purification Supplies 






and Expenses 


6,533.05 




General Labor 


6.521.46 
66,454.96 




Administrative : 






General Office Salaries 


24,600.49 




General Office Supplies 






and Expenses 


2,958.93 




Insurance 


3,521.88 




Transportation 


5,564.16 




Maintenance : 






General Structures 


477.^9 




Depreciation 


63,258.79 




Pensions 


8,319.96 




Interest on Bonds 


16,647.50 




Misc. General Expenses 


57lt55 
125,920.75 




Total Expenses: 


192,375.71 




Profit or (Loss) 


7.084.74 






199.^60,45 


199.460.45 



39 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 31, 1972 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 



Current Assets: 




Liabilities : 




Cash: 




Bonds Payable 


335,000.00 


Surplus 


-0- 


Surplus : 




Operations-1972 


(7,911.05) 


Profit or Loss 


(107,767.66) 


Plant Investment 


646.49 


Town Contribution 


416,505.58 


Construction-1971 


13 ,313 .9* 


Campanelli Cont. 


46,000.00 


Dow*s Brook Reservoir 


516.69 


APW Mass. 7I-C- Cont. 


179,544.52 


Water Main Construction 


430.71 


Property Account 


981,308.27 


Construction 1970 


10.543.26 


Electric Contribution 


39.338.91 




17.539.64 




1,554,929.62 


Accounts Receivable: 








Rates & Services 


31,828.73 






Added to Taxes 


2.568.46 
34,397.19 






Materials & Supplies 


30.775.88 






Total Current Assets 


82,712.71 






Fixed Assets: 








Engineering 


49,493.77 






Land 


20,249.72 






New Well System 


129,004.72 






Pumping Station 


65,555.36 






Reservoirs & Standpipes 


436,627.27 






Storage Basins 


27,693.59 






Dist. Reservoirs 


135,979.62 






Departmental Buildings 


5,887.57 






Store House 


5,137.25 






Pumps & Pumping Equip. 


69,985.05 






Purification System 


8,177.55 






Pipe Lines & Dist. Mains 


1,330,226.74 






Service Pipes 


225,130.59 






Meters 


87,255.38 






Consumers Meters Installed 


1,750.40 






Hydrants 


40,362.63 






Misc. Expenditures 


1,912.10 






Office Equipment 


6,865.80 






Shop Equipment 


8,512.07 






Stores Equipment 


68.26 






Trans. Equip. 


43,517.20 






Misc. Equipment 


15.194.35 
2,714,586.99 






Less Reserve for Deprec. 


907.370.08 
1,807,216.91 






Total Assets: 


1.889.929.62 




1.889.929.62 



40 




Town Manager Richard N. Conti 
attaches the 5 Trumpet Badge on 
the hat of the Town's new Fire 
Chief, Theodore F. Mozdziez. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Theodore F. Mozdziez, Chief 

The Fire Department had an active year. The 
Town's growth in building and population accounts for 
the increased activities. With the increasing suburban 
type community we now live in, it is anticipated that 
over the coming years the department services will also 
increase. Three additional men will be added during 
the midyear to the force due to a reduction in 
working hours from 56 to 48. 

The department made a total of 343 responses. Of 
these 79 were Bell Alarms, 264 were still Alarms. A 
summary of the serious calls include: 



Resuscitator 
Building Fires 
Oil Burners 
Car Fires 
Electrical 
Bomb Reports 
Search & Rescue 



Other activities included woods, grass, stoves, dryers, 
rubbish and numerous miscellaneous calls as follows: 



The present staffing includes: 



971 


1972 


12 


18 


19 


19 


15 


12 


36 


33 


22 


9 


5 


6 


6 


9 



71 


1972 


16 


12 


78 


81 


95 


135 


18 


17 



Blasting Permits 
Oil Burner Inspections 
Complaints Investigated 
False Alarms 



Fire loss total for the year shows $33,118.00 paid 
out on buildings valued at $2,659,230.00. 

The new ladder purchased this year is a 100' 
Aerial. The contract was awarded to the American 
LaFrance Corp. Date of delivery is expected to be in 
September. This is a welcomed replacement and should 
enhance our firefighting capabilities and effectiveness. 



Chief Theodore Mozdziez 
Captain Harold Wile 
Captain Samuel Chouinard 
(Acting) Captain Melvin Bowen 
Private Romeo Blaquiere 
Private Maynard Boutchie 
Private Joseph Burns 
Private Warren Cogswell 
Private Edwin Emerson 
Private Kenneth Hall 
Private Arthur Hardy 
Private George Hulbert 
Private Charles Moon 
Private Robert Como 
Private Robert Fowler 
Private Charles Stevens 
Fire Cadet Bruce Cutler 
30 Call Force Members 



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33 




Civil Defense Director 
John R. Harrigan 



Assistant Director - 
Robert O'Meara 




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Q 



CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 

Robert O'Meara, Assistant Director 

The Ipswich Civil Defense Agency of Ipswich has 
made great strides in emergency readiness preparation. 
First - The building of an Emergency Operational 
Center. Second — The coordination of Auxiliary Fire 
and Radio groups into a smooth working Team. A 
team of dedicated people working with one goal in 
mind. The GOAL - This whole conception of 
emergency readiness can be summed up by saying that 
the forces of Government, and all others with 
emergency missions, must be able to do the right 



thing at the right time when the chips are down. This 
includes procedures for coordinating the operations of 
Police forces, Ambulances, Fire forces, Hospital, 
Medical personnel, and all other people and units with 
capabilities for helping citizens under disaster 
conditions. 

Through the Civil Defense Agency the Town of 
Ipswich received a total of $21,000 for storm damage 
for the storm in February, 1972. A survey of storm 
damage was made. An application was filed and a 
grant of said amount was given to the Town to repair 
damages. This alone proves the value of Civil Defense 
to the Town. 



U 




AUXILIARY POLICE 



Rudolph Provost, Captain 




II. 



III. 



The following is an outline report on the activities of the 
Ipswich Auxiliary Police for the year 1972: 

I. Bi-Monthly Meetings. 

A. Usual Business Transactions 

B. Special Transactions. 

1. Ten training classes on "General Police IV. 
Work" given by Officer John Poirier 
during the months of March through 
July. 

2. One training class on "The Use of Mace" V. 
given by Sergeant Frank Geist. 

34 



3. Two training classes on "Arrest and 
Search Procedure" given by Liaison 
Officer Edward Rauscher. 

4. Three training classes on "Functions and 
Duties of Auxiliary Police While on 
Summer Patrol and Active Duty" given 
by Chief Pete Brouillette. 

5. Ten hour course on "First Aid" given by 
Jack Good, Kenny Spellman, and Pete 
Karnes (Red Cross Instructors). 

John Harrigan Resigns from Captaincy. *~""^l 

A. Lieutenant Rudolph Provost is appointed to 
Captain's position. 

B. Sergeant David Clements is appointed to 
Lieutenant's position. 

Continuation of Summer Cruiser Patrol. 

A. Carried out for 13 weeks during the months of 
June, July, and August on Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings from 
7 to 1 1 p.m. 

B. This represents 2 men each night, 32 man 
hours per week for a total of 416 man hours 
for the duration. 

Memorial Day Parade 

A. Seventeen men marched. 

B. Three men performed traffic duty. 

17th Century Day. 

A. Fifteen men performed traffic duty. 



VI. Winter Patrol. 

A. Winter Patrol performed 16 Friday nights from 
September through December. 

B. Two men on patrol for 4 hours from 7 to 1 1 
p.m. for a total of 128 man hours. 

VII. Halloween Patrol. 

A. Carried out two nights 

1. Fifteen men patrolled Monday, October 
30th. 

2. Twelve men patrolled Tuesday, October 
31st. 

B. Each man patrolled for 4 hours for a total of 
108 man hours. 

VIII. Call Outs 

A. On January 13, 1972, Fifteen men responded 



on a lost child search and rescue on Mile Lane. 
B. On February 16, 1972, Seventeen men 
responded on a search and rescue for three 
missing boys on upper Linebrook Road. 

IX. Substituted for Regular Police on November 18, 
1972. 

A. Twenty Auxiliary Policemen substitute for 
regular police officers, each on 8 hour shifts. 

B. This represents a total of 160 man hours. 

X. Jeep Patrol. 

A. Entailed patrolling of two men for ten Sunday 
mornings from 9 to 11 a.m. during the months 
of March and April 

B. This represents a total of 50 man hours. 



AUXILIARY FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Ed Francis, Captain 

The Ipswich Auxiliary Fire Department, which 
consist of twenty-six men, reported to the fire station 
for more than 70 alarms. There were eighteen 
meetings held and six parades attended. 

A number of the members took advantage of 
several training programs; such programs were: Weekly 
drills with our own equipment, a fire fighting course 
at the Massachusetts Civil Defense Training Academy 
in Topsfield, a cariopulmanory Resusitation course, and 
a Fire Fighting Course at Meadowood Fire School in 
Fitzwilliam, New Hampshire. 

Elected at the September meeting were; Captain Ed 
Francis, Lieutenants Stanley Colburn and Kenneth 
Fowler, Treasurer Thomas Hills, Supply Officer 
Norman Stone, and Secretary Jeffrey Hardy. 

Four hundred hours alone were spent on the upkeep 
and general maintenance of the Auxiliary Fire Equipment, 
not only vehicles, but pumps and related fire fighting 
equipment. 




Inventory of all equipment was taken and an overall 
effort is being made to maintain and store supplies so 
they will be in a readiness condition at all times. 



COMMUNICATION GROUP 



Leon Dorr, Radio Officer 

With our current active members, we can provide, 
on a full-time basis, eight mobile units and four men 
at EOC for base station control and liaison on three 
channels of radio communications. 

Group Activities have included: Regular drills, two 
nights each month. Regular drill with Sector, one 
night each month. Portable communications for lost 
child search. Mobile communications for Auxiliary 
police two evenings for Halloween. Mobile and base 
communications for simulated hurricane disaster. Open 
House at EOC. Many evening and week-end work 
parties for construction of the EOC and equipment 
installation. 




35 



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SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 



Arthur Moon, Shellfish Constable 



For the year of 1972 there was a large demand for 
local clams. Maryland was shut off because of heavy 
rains. 

The following permits were issued: 

199 Commercial Permits («> $20.00/year 
800 Resident Non-Commercial @ $2.50/year 
384 Non-Resident @ $2.50/day 
236 Yearly Non-Resident @ $15.00/year 

In the course of the year, some of the areas for 
winter digging had to be closed. Studies were done 
with Dr. Moore and Mr. Terrell on clam flats and 
water. 

On September 14 all clam flat areas were closed 
because of the Red Tide. Many samples were taken in 
all areas and tested at the laboratories. On December 
20th one portion was opened because the state 
standard count of 80 or below had been reached. 
Many meetings were attended in Boston to get these 
areas opened. Clams are limited on the amount you 
can take in these areas. In the course of the Red 
Tide we had men cleaning mussels for five weeks in 
the beach area .... they did a good job. 

Several meetings were held with the Shellfish 
Advisory Board. This is a very active group at 
meetings and in the field. 




I few "live" clams found during the pernicious red tide. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



* 



* 



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HARBOR DEPARTMENT 



Arthur Moon, Ex-Harbor Master 



Early in the Spring two floats were repaired at the 
wharf. Channel Markers were put in the Ipswich River 
and Eagle Hill area. New five mile an hour signs were 
made up. There were a large amount of calls for 
mooring areas. Three men were appointed as Assistant 
Harbor Masters in the Yacht Club area. With the 
assistance of the Fire Department, one fire damaged 
boat was towed in. 



The Harbor Master's position required excessive 
amount of time during the height of the shellfish 
season. In June, Charles Bayley was appointed Harbor 
Master and worked in this capacity until August. We 
appreciate Mr. Bayley 's services during a time when 
the Harbor Master's activities were at a peak as were 
shellfish activities. 




Arthur Moon, ex-Harbor Master, assists the Fire Dept. in 
extinguishing a boat fire - one of the many duties of 
harbor master. (Ipswich Chronicle) 



36 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Roland Foucher, Agent 

Dr. William C. Wigglesworth , Chairman 

Norman L. Quint 

Dr. Joseph W. Adamowicz 

Clinics held throughout the year: 

Well Child Clinic: 

This clinic is held the first Monday of * every 
month at the Winthrop School, between 3:00 and 
4:00 p.m. The clinic is for pre-school children and 
there is no charge for immunization shots which 
include: Measles, Rubella, DJ\T., Polio, etc. 

Rabies Clinic: 

This clinic was held at the Town Garage in May, 
1972, a total of 364 dogs were immunized and 
$396.00 was turned into the Town Treasury. 

At a Board of Health meeting in July it was voted 
to have percolation tests done only from March 1, 
until May 31 and each ensuing year. Building permits 
will not be issued after May 31 except where there is 
a sanitary sewer abutting the property. 




110 Burial Permits and 3 removal permits were 
issued by the Board of Health. Permits and licenses 
were issued for: milk, oleo, restaurant, motel, milk 
pasteurizing, collection of fat and bones, individual 
septic systems, cleaning and pumping of septic systems, 
ice cream manufacturing, methyl alcohol, etc. 

There were 164 plumbing permits and 86 gas 
permits issued in 1972. 



* 




* 



VETERANS SERVICES 
Frank Story, Director 

The primary function of the Veterans' Benefits 
program is to relieve hardship. It deals with disability, 
unemployment, the unemployable, illness, strikes and, 
even, disaster. It is, therefore, difficult to estimate 
with great accuracy the expenditure under this 
program. The number of veterans and their dependents 
receiving assistance in the Town of Ipswich under 
Chapter 115 of the General Laws, as amended, is 
being reported by the number of cases processed 
monthly, as follows: January - 82, February - 81, 
March - 78, April - 65, May - 67, June - 68, July - 
69, August - 69, September - 68, October - 67, 
November - 77, December - 80. A total of 871 cases 
were processed this year. 42 applications for the 
Massachusetts Vietnam bonus were filed. Exclusive of 
the bonus, 50% of the cost of the Benefit program is 
reimbursed by the State. Expenditures are listed in the 
financial statement of the Town Report. 

Veterans' Services — Federal 

It is the primary function of this department to 
secure all Federal funds for veterans and their 
dependents to which they are entitled. Services 



rendered to veterans and their dependents are as 
follows: 22 Applications for Replacement of Separation 
Documents, 30 Education Applications, 70 Power of 
Attorney forms, 16 Applications for Hospital 
Treatment, 19 Applications for Real Estate 
Abatements, 14 Treasury Checks returned, 4 Headstone 
Applications, 29 Applications for Pensions and 
Compensations, 45 Statements in Support of Claim, 18 
Statements of Income & Net Worth, 26 Applications 
for Outpatient Treatment, 54 Annual Questionnaire 
cards, 16 Change of Address forms, 20 Certificates of 
Eligibility, 5 Claims for Insurance or Indemnity, 3 
Requests and Consent to Release Information, 1 
Application for Vocational Rehabilitation, 7 Requests 
for Change of School or Program, 1 Statement of 
Disappearance, 12 Requests for School Attendance, 8 
Headstone Applications, 4 Flag Applications, 32 
Requests for Copy of War Records and 6 Applications 
for Insurance Claims. 

Compensations and Pensions obtained through this 
office for Ipswich veterans and their dependents 
totaled $241,752.00 yearly. Hospitalizations in VA 
facilities saved the Town of Ipswich $44,440.00. 
Educational benefits being received by veterans and 
their dependents total $96,176.00. These three 
categories account for a total of $382,368.00 in 
savings to the Town of Ipswich. There is no cost to 
the Town or the State for Federal monies received. 



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PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Kevin D. McElhinney, Director 

The Public Works Department is a conglomerate of 
the following divisions: Highway, Forestry, Water, 
Sewer, Equipment Maintenance and Building 
Maintenance, Lach division is charged with the 
responsibility of its own particular duties. During the 
times when excess manpower is needed to perform 
any specific task, personnel are exchanged within the 
divisions so as to better accomplish the completion of 
the task. I have listed below the major projects 
performed by each dividion. 

Highway 

Surface treatments consisting of oil, stone and sand 
mixture, were applied to the following streets: 



Candlewood Road 
Fellow's Road 
Sagamore Road 
Upper River Road 
Masconomet Road 
Beechwood Road 



Mitchell Road 
Mile Lane 
Stage Hill Road 
Bayvicw Road 
Bunker Hill Road 
Lowe's Lane 



New top wearing surfaces were applied 
following streets: 



on the 



Riley Avenue 
*Labor-in-Vain Road 
♦Little Neck Road 

Clark Road 



Appleton Park 
Sal ford Street 
Winter Street 
Topsfield Road 
East Street 



*Work done with money appropriated by Federal 
Government due to storm damage February 19, 
1972. 





Road Repair is a continuous job for the Highway 
Department. (Ipswich Chronicle) 




Bituminous concrete base courses were applied on 

the following streets; the work was done in 

conjunction with sewer construction. These streets are 
scheduled to receive new wearing surfaces in 1973: 



Oakhurst Avenue 
Juniper Street 
Pleasant Street 
Cogswell Street 
Sawyer Street 
Perlcy Ave. North 
Perley Avenue 



Ryan Avenue 
Blaisdell Terrace 
Wainwright Street 
Congress Street 
Fairview Avenue 
Broadway Avenue 
Brownvdle Avenue 



In addition, division personnel worked on snow and 
ice operations, drainage maintenance, and assisted on 
sewerage construction. 

Building Maintenance 

Capital improvements were limited to the 
installation of new cellblocks in the Town Hall, 
replacing antiquated cells in the basement. 

Equipment Maintenance 

Division personnel are responsible for maintenance 

of all Town vehicles. The work is done on a 

scheduled basis to insure that vehicles are kept in top 
mechanical order. 

Forestry 

Mosquito spraying continued into the second year. 
Under this operation, all areas of the Town are 
sprayed at least once per week during the months of 
June, July, August and September. Division personnel 
also spray breeding areas to try to lessen the effect of 
these summer pests. 

Other activities of the division include: removal of 
diseased elms; spraying of elms with dormant spray; 
spraying of elms for leaf beetles; thorough spraying of 
oaks for oak leaf skeletonizer worms; worked 
thirty -two days with the Electric Department, clearing 
lines. 

Water 

New pumps were required at the Winthrop Well No. 
1 and Mile Lane Well sites. Heavy rainfall during 1972 
caused the water supply to be in excellent condition 
during the year. This also caused some decrease in 
revenue due to shortage of grounds waterings. 



38 



During late fall, the Town cleaned water mains on 
County Road, Outer Linebrook Road and Topsfield 
Road. This cleaning was done in order to eliminate a 
"Red Water" situation that had existed since March 
and has persisted throughout the year. Chemical 
analysis records indicated that as of March, the water 
took on a more acid character and the hardness factor 
also became more severe. These two factors 
contributed to the exhilarated corrosion and breaking 
down of corrosion matter in the water pipe. It is 
planned that the water pipe cleaning program will be 
continued until all cast iron mains are cleaned and 
cement lined. We estimate this program will take three 
or more years, but will greatly enhance the quality of 
water delivered to each home. 

A brief summation of the division's functions is as' 
follows: 





1970 


1971 


1972 


New meters installed: 


92 


101 


102 


Meters replaced: 


89 


97 


131 


Services turned on: 


172 


165 


167 


Services turned off: 


129 


148 


163 


New Services: 


23 


56 


55 


Services Discontinued: 


2 


1 


1 


Hydrants Installed: 


16 


12 


3 


Hydrants removed: 


6 








New Water Mains Installed 


7,516' 


16,926' 





Total Length of Mains: 






383,247' 


Total Water Services: 








Metered Services: 






2,982 


Unmetered Sales: 






143 


Summer Services: 






177 


Total 






3,302 



Water Usage (gallons) 408,907,700 417,307,900 479,426,150 




Water Department Employee, Earl Richards 
waits while the "not-so-clear" water is 
flushed from this hydrant. (Ipswich Today) 




The "Go-Go-Devil" is simply a long metal pipe with various scraping knives installed along the pipe with 
pressure blades which allow the instrument to be propelled through the pipe scraping rust and scale off the 
inside walls. 

Sewer 

In addition to normal maintenance and inspections, sewers were installed in all or part of the following 
streets: 



Abell Avenue 

Bush Hill Road 

Perley Avenue North 
Broadway Ave. Exten. 
Sawyer Street 
Pleasant Street 
Blaisdell Terrace 



Appleton Park 
Linebrook Road 
Washington Street 
High Street 

Oakhurst Avenue 
Juniper Street 



Topsfield Road 
Perley Avenue 
Cogswell Street 
Congress Street 
Fairview Avenue 
Brownville Avenue 
Ryan Avenue 



Records were kept, and divisional statistics are as 
follows: 



Sewage Treated/daily av.: 
Total Sewage Treated: 
New Connections: 
Total Connections: 
Chlorine Used: 


1970 
430,016 gls. 
156,956,000 gls. 
86 

9.675 tons 
39 


1971 
476,846 gls. 
176,249,000 gls. 
81 

13.8 tons 


1972 

628,184 gls 

229,287,000 gls 

99 

922 

16.2 tons 



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BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ralph Hebert 



* 




1972 


1971 


Construction Valuations $1,925,925 


$2,693,326 


Fees Collected 2,839 


3,442 


Permits Issued: 




New Construction 49 


73 


Miscellaneous 




(additions, remodeling, signs, 




pools, and siding) 67 


70 



The ability to work full time has enhanced the 
effectiveness of this department. It provides an 
opportunity to work more closely with builders and to 
prevent after-the-fact correction of potentially serious 
problems. 

Special attention has been devoted to strict 
compliance with the building code and conformity to 
the /oning by-laws. 



* 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James H. Daly, Director 

Increased activities and several new programs 
contributed to a highly successful summer playground 
season that kept hundreds of Ipswich youngsters both 
busy and happy. The continued cooperation of 
individual volunteers, local organizations and Town 
Departments was a factor in helping the Department to 
initiate, improve and execute a variety of activities that 
were well received by both the children and parents. 

Innovations were the Mini Tours of Ipswich, The 
Castle Hill Family Picnic and the Tennis instruction that 
was followed by a Tourney amongst the students. The 
Mini -Tours included visits to Crane's Beach, the Castle 
grounds, LaSalette, Sacred Heart Juniorate grounds, a 
tour of the Neck areas, Sagamore Hill, the Nike site and 
other points of interest. 



Most popular was the all day picnic within the Crane 
Castle grounds where upwards of 300 youngsters 
participated in games, races, swimming, a kite flying 
contest and a free lunch. Interest was also high in the 
Tennis instruction program carried out at the Linebrook 
courts where 150 youngsters, boys and girls, took part. 
The instruction period was followed by a Tourney 
amongst the students and trophies awarded in several 
age groups. 

Other highlights of the summer season were the visits 
here by the Stagemobilc and the Zoomobile and the 
day trips via busses to Fenway Park, the Beverly Music 
Theatre, to Crane's Beach lor the annual Sand Sculpture 
contest and the ever popular Lincoln Park. 

Daily attendance (average) at the eight staffed 
playgrounds ranged between 500 and 600 depending on 
weather conditions. Upwards of 400 boys and girls 
participated in the Swim Instruction program that was 
carried out concurrently with the daily playground 
activities, the many special events and inter-playground 
sports competitions. Two Pony League teams entered 
into the Inter Town League were sponsored by the 
Department. 

Continuing on a successful vein was the adult men's 
Softball league involving 350 players and using four 
fields. It is expected that activity in this sport will 
expand in 1973. All teams are self supporting with the 
Recreation Department supplying bases, pitcher's rubbers 
and home plates. Organizational paper work is carried 
out by the Recreation office where monthly meetings 
are held. 

Golden Age Club members enjoyed seven day long 
trips to various points of interest. Intown features 
included the annual Installation and Banquet, a picnic at 
the LaSalette grounds, a Theatre party at the Strand, a 
Christmas party at the V.F.W. Hall and several special 
programs at the Club's meeting place in the K of C 
Hall. Membership remains open to citizens of Ipswich 
and Rowley who have reached their sixtieth birthday. In 
the case of couples, both are eligible providing at least 



40 



one of the spouses have attained the eligible age. The 
Club meets regularly on the first and third Tuesdays of 
each month at 2:00 p.m. in the K of C Hall on 
Topsfield Road. 

The Recreation program in Ipswich is looked upon as 
one of the best in the North Shore area and beyond. 
Activities, indoor and outdoor, too numerous to 
mention here are carried out on a twelve month basis 
utilizing the school gyms and other facilities when 
available. The Department also maintains and supervises 
the rentals at the Beach Lighthouse cottage and 
schedules the use of the Memorial Building. 

Weeklong activities are provided for youngsters during 
school vacation periods. The Department always stands 
ready to impart its knowledge and loan equipment to 
local organizations when requested. 

In order to keep pace with the times and the 
resulting increased activities in Municipal recreation the 
Department has two goals set for 1973. The first is the 
start of a long overdue lighting program to bring about 
double use of existing facilities. The second is the 
establishment of a program and facilities for special 
children which will be 50 percent reimburseable from 
Federal funds. 

Members of the appointed Recreation-Parks 
Commission are: Chairman Charles Foley; Frederick 
Jenkins, Eleanor Knowles, Douglas Holland and 
Elizabeth Geanakakis. 



Parks 

Along with maintaining approximately fifty acres of 
Parkland, Commons, Playgrounds etc. the crews carried 
out several projects including the construction of two 
Ice Skating Rinks, one at Giles Firmin Playground and 
another on the former Heard property; installed 
additional Finger piers at the Hood's Pond Swim 
Instruction area; installed _ portable bleachers at three 
Ball Fields, put up fencing at Giles Firmin Playground; 
hot-topped an area of Father Rye playground and 
installed major pieces of playground equipment at the 
Neck property. 

Department crews were busy from April until 
September maintaining and improving nine active 
Baseball, Softball fields, three Playground fields 
(Softball), the two Neck beaches, the Lighthouse 
Parking lot and building and the lawns and shrubbery of 
the Light, Water and Highway Departments. Crews also 
participated in the general town cleanup in preparation 
for Olde Ipswich Week. 

It is noted that, vandalism on these parcels of land 
maintained by the Department was on the increase and 
steps have been taken to minimize losses. 

Further improvements and additional equipment are 
planned for 1973. The continued cooperation of the 
Light, Water, Forestry, Fire and School Departments in 
carrying out certain projects is hereby gratefully 
acknowledged. 



Sponsored by the 
Recreation Dept. the 
zoomobile again came 
to the kids of 
Ipswich. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 




41 



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CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Walter H. Hulbert, Jr., Superintendent 
Gordon C. Player, Commissioner Chairman 
Leon B. Turner, Commissioner 
Nicholas A. Markos, Commissioner 

The death rate was high again this year, resulting in 
109 interments, compared with 1 17 in 1971 and 85 in 
1970. 

Two eight grave lots, seven four grave lots, six two 
grave lots and one single were sold with perpetual care. 
Converted from annual care to perpetual care were two, 



Vandalism in our Cemeteries is the cause of many extra 
labor-hours and unnecessarily spent money for our 
Cemetery Dept. (Ipswich Chronicle) 

ten grave lots one, eight grave lot and three, four grave 
lots. Awarded by American Legion for Veterans and 
their families were six, four grave five, two grave and 
one single grave, with no revenue for care of these lots. 

Sixty three monument foundations were dug and 
laid. Twenty government markers were set for veterans. 
Fifteen sets of granite corner bounds for lots sold and 
awarded were set. Forty three monuments were repaired 
and re -set. Most of this work was caused by vandals and 
had to be repaired. 

Two hundred fifty nine tons of Hot Top were used 
to re-surface the avenues in New Highland Cemetery. 

On our equipment replacement program, we 
purchased two heavy duty self propelled 36" Bunto 
Rotary Mowers, and one 36" rotary for small tractor 
mower and five 20" rotary mowers. 

During the winter months the avenues were plowed 
with Cemetery four wheel drive, which is also used day 
and night during heavy snow storms to assist the Public 
Works Department in clearing roads and parking areas. 

The following is list of receipts for services rendered 
by the Department in 1972. 



Openings for Interments 
Sectional liners 
Chapel Tent Rental 
New Lots & Graves 
Foundations & Bounds 
Annual Care 
Perpetual Care Income 
Perpetual Flower Fund 
Misc. 



New Perpetual Care Deposits 

New Perpetual Flower Fund Deposits 



$ 6,760.00 

760.00 

855.00 

2,350.00 

1,243.87 

738.00 

7,000.00 

300.00 

10.00 

$20,016.87 

4,245.00 
1,300.00 

$ 5,545.00 
I 




Mrs. Joanne McMahon 
along with some high 
school students on 
guitars, accompany a sing 
along for these kids at 
the Library. 

(Ipswich Today) 



42 




Anna Kjos, past Children 's Librarian, conducts an in- 
formal instruction session to many wide-eyed children. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Crowley, Librarian 

Keeping pace with national trends, the Ipswich Public 
Library is responding by adapting the institution to the 
needs of the people. From its traditional role as 
custodian of the book collection, the library is growing 
into a vital, user-oriented information center with 
emphasis on service. Better than 50% of the communiry 
(6,478) are registered borrowers, with the past year 
alone showing an increase of over 2,200 new users. As 
the town's needs" grow, and as interior space diminishes, 
your library is reaching out more and more into the 
community, supplying or expanding service in areas 
previously unmet: 

—To the homebound: an extension of library service 
initiated with the volunteer assistance of the 
Friends of the Library. 

—To the visually and physically handicapped: Talking 
Books from the Library of Congress; large type 
books and newspapers. 

-To senior members of the community: monthly 
book talks, bringing stories and book reviews to 
nursing homes, in cooperation with the Friends. 
With additional manpower, we hope to expand 
this program from its modest beginnings. 

—To children: a summer bookmobile run by 
volunteers. 

-To education: for the part-time adult student, more 
reference assistance ... for the junior/senior high 
student, individualized instruction in library use 
. . . cooperation in open-campus ... for the 
elementary school pupil, classroom visits, stories 
and films ... for the teacher, library materials and 
reader's advisory service. 

The highest priority of the library continues to be to 
bring the best and the latest in printed material to the 
community, supplying the right book to the right 
person at the right time. 



As your local information center, the library has 
provided : 

—A list of agencies dealing with the problems of 
retardation. 

—Names of shipping companies doing business with 
the Port of Boston. 

—Academy Award Winners of the Thirties. 

—Books on dyslexia. 

—A list of Legal Aid Societies serving Essex County. 

Program Highlights of the Year: 

—For children, a sing-along, story hours, movies. 

—For adults, cultural traditions of the town, rotating 
art exhibitions, "Ipswich Speaks". 

The Friends of the Library continue to contribute 
invaluable assistance, with an active in-service program, 
an annual book sale and tag day. 

The services of the Eastern Regional Library System 
enable us, as a member library, to bring to Ipswich the 
combined media and informational resources of member 
libraries in a network linked by daily truck delivery 
service. For the user, this means quicker delivery of 
books and films secured through inter-library loan. 

Following a favorable vote on Article 19 at the 1972 
Town Meeting, initial steps have been taken by the 
Board of Trustees to change the terms of the original 
trusts governing the library in order to meet the 
growing needs of the community for library service. 

With a total of 6,478 registered borrowers, Ipswich 
ranks high among libraries of the Commonwealth. For 
1973-74, a major goal of the library is to reach an even 
larger percentage of the community. 

Circulation of library materials totalled 141,107, an 
increase that reflects both the growth of the town and 
rate of library use. 

3,243 books were added to the collection, bringing 
the total number of volumes to 50,436. 

For the best in information, recreation and education 
call or visit your public library. The library is open 
from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 
Evening hours are Monday through Thursday 
6:30-8:30. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
The Children's Room is closed during the evening hours. 

Kids take advantage of the newly founded bookmobile. 
Sponsored by the Friends of the Library. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 




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Electric Department Employees hang the Christmas 
Decorations for the 1972 Holidays. (Ipswich Today) 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 

Alfred Tobiasz, Manager 

The Electric Department along with the Electric 
Advisory Board and the Board of Selectmen are 
investigating land areas and construction methods to 
construct a new Light Department building. The 
building will contain the billing offices, engineering 
office, meter department, stockroom and vehicle storage. 
It will be large enough to contain all the materials 
needed for the installation and maintenance of overhead 
and underground construction. 

At this time we are extremely limited in our storage 
space. A new facility will allow us to purchase materials 
in large quantities at a far lower co v st. We are forced to 
increase our amount of stock due to increasing delivery 
dates on all materials. For example overhead 
transformers 20-36 weeks and pad mount transformers 
54-60 weeks. 

The primary reason which necessitates constructing a 
new building is that our existing garage and storage area 
located on South Main Street, which is rented space, 
has been sold and we must vacate by April of 1973. 

A new aerial bucket truck was put into operation in 
November. This truck was purchased to satisfy the 
requirements for a more efficient and smoother 
operation by the Department personnel for the 
installation and maintenance of distribution lines. 



Construction Completed in 1972 

1. The conversion of the 4l60 volt circuit on East 
Street, Jeffreys Neck Road and Little Neck Road to 
a point just beyond the intersection of Plover Hill 

Road and Little Neck Road including Mulholland Drive 
to 13,200 volts was completed. A stepdown transformer 
bank was installed on North Ridge Road and Plover Hill 
Road. This work was done to supply additional power 
to these areas. 

2. Overhead cable was extended on Old Right Road and 
Newbury Road to provide power to new homes. 650 
feet of underground cable was installed along Heard 

Drive and 900 feet was installed to provide power to 
the Bayside Apartments off Topsfield Road. 

3. 45 streetlighting fixtures, 35 overhead services and 29 
underground services, 26 poles, 26,482 feet of 
overhead wire and 1 1 ,582 feet of underground cables 

and 2,734 KVA of transformers were added to the 
system. 

Maintenance 

33 overhead and 4 underground services, 96 poles 
and 32 streetlighting fixtures were replaced. 

Statistics 



Year 


Aver. Kwh Used 


KW Peak 


Meters in 




Residential Customers 


Demand 


Service 


1952 


1632 


2970 


3051 


1957 


2225 


4400 


3393 


1962 


2994 


6445 


3773 


1967 


3819 


8600 


4078 


1972 


5965 


12050 


4556 



Construction Proposed 

1. Install a 23000 volt spacer cable circuit on High 
Street from substation No. 4 to a point just beyond 
Mitchell Road. 

2. Install spacer cable on Linebrook Road from corner 
of Plains Road to Forrest Park. The existing wires 
are not large enough to take care of future load 
requirements. 

3. Install capacitors on North Ridge and Little Neck 
Roads. 

4. Continue to install new mercury vapor street light 
fixtures on various streets. 

5. Continue installation of underground wires on Heard 
Drive and Dudley Way. 

Generation 

Maintenance was carried out by station personnel and 
all units at the end of the year were in good operating 
condition. 

The annual peak demand was 12050 KW on 
December 21, 1972 which represents an increase of 
5.24% over last year. 



Power Generated and Purchased 



Generated 
Purchased 
Total KWH 



1970 

27,131,380 
22,967,877 
50,099,257 



1971 

25,212,720 
25,246,768 
50,459,488 



1972 

28,047,280 
28,003,200 
56,050,480 



This represents an increase of 1 1 .08% over last year. 



44 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Irving Small, Chairman 

Jacob Israelsohn 

William H. Smith 

John Eby 

Gordon Burlingham 

Peter Zervas 

Alfred D. Castantini 

Mrs. Jessie Girard 

Mrs. Maryruth Williamson 




* 



During the spring and early summer of 1972, the 
Government Study Committee had a number of joint 
meetings with the Board of Selectmen to discuss 
Committee recommendations for revision of the Town 
By-laws. More recently, during the fall, your Chairman 
met with Selectman Charles K. Cobb, Jr., in sessions 
devoted to editorial and technical review and revision of 
a draft set of By-laws which we expect will be ready 
for submission to voters of the Town for action at the 
1973 Annual Town Meeting. 

During 1972, except for the continuing By-law review 
project, the Committee has not had before it for 
consideration any study commission from the Board of 
Selectmen. 



* 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Jane Bokron, Executive Director 

Glenfred Wanzer, Chairman 

Alexander Bernhard, Vice-Chairman (State Appointee) 

Stanley Eustace, Treasurer 

Arthur Weagle, Assistant Treasurer 

John Thatcher, Jr., Commissioner 

The Ipswich Housing Authorty was organized on 
Tuesday, April 27, 1948 in the Selectmen's Room at 
7:30 p.m. Elections at that time were as follows: 

Thomas A. Johnson, Chairman 

Fred G. Whittier, Vice-Chairman 

William J. H. Ewing, Secretary and Treasurer 

Sidney Shurcliff, Assistant Treasurer 

Much has happened to the Ipswich Housing 
Authority during the past 25 years. There are now three 
State Housing Developments in the Town of Ipswich 
operated and maintained by the Ipswich Housing 
Authority; namely, Projects 200-1, 667 -C and 667-3, 
plus the administering of 707 Rent Subsidy Program. 

200-1 Veterans' Housing — This project, built in 
1950, has all underground wiring. Ground-breaking 
ceremonies were held August 16, 1949. The Veterans' 
Project consists of seven buildings and houses 24 
families. Each unit has its own gas furnace, hot water 
heater and gas stove. The Authority pays for the water 
and the tenant pays all other utilities. The average 
shelter rent per unit is $70.50 per month. This is based 
on the number of dependents and gross income per 
family. 

667-C Housing for the Elderly - The present 667-C 
elderly housing consists of 62 apartments - 20 at 
Southern Manor and 42 at Caroline Avenue - Whittier 
Park. (Whittier Park was named after Fred G. Whittier, 
one of the original members of the Board.) The average 
shelter rent, based on 25 per cent of the total income 
of the tenant, is $47.50. Each apartment has a living 
room, kitchen, bedroom and bath, and is equipped with 
an electric stove and a refrigerator. 

667-3 Development Housing for the Elderly - During 
January 1972, elderly tenants moved into 58 new 
apartments on Caroline Avenue, bringing the total to 
120 units for the senior citizens. The 58 new units were 
built identical to the other 42 units on Caroline 



Avenue. During the summer of 1972, a Laundry Room, 
with 2 washers and 2 dryers, was built in part of the 
existing garage. An exterior lighted apartment directory 
was installed next to the Laundry Room. Late in 
November of 1972, a 20-foot extension to the 
Recreation Hall was opened up for the benefit of all 
senior citizens in the Town of Ipswich. 

Rent Subsidy Chapter 707 — This is a program 
which provides subsidy to low income families, including 
elderly people. It allows the Authority to rent private 
apartments and to pay a rent supplement to make up 
the difference in the agreed total monthly rent for the 
apartment. In 1972, the Authority paid $44,211 in rent 
subsidy to private landlords. 

In 1971, the Housing Authority set up a Tenants' 
Organization in which two representatives for each 
project (total of 8, plus one tenant representative for 
Project 707) appointed by the tenants of each project 
to attend the regular monthly meetings to voice 
grievances and suggestions from their own respective 
projects to the Authority. 

On April 10, 1972 Joseph Ruest was hired as a 
full-time Maintenance Man for all projects operated by 
the Ipswich Housing Authority. 

Discussion during a business meeting include Housing 
Authority members, Arthur Weagle, Jane Bokron, Glen- 
fred Wanzer, Alexander Bernhard and John Thatcher. 
Missing from the picture is Stanley Eustace. 

(House of Hinlin) 




45 




Before 



(Ipswich Chronicle) 



The Old Payne School is now being used to House the School 
Administration Offices. After many hours of repairing and remodeling, 
the Payne School is now an attractive sight on Lord's Square. 




i^r. 4 



After 



(Ipswich Today) 



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First Row /l-r/ 


Term Expires 


Mr. James F. Collins 


1975 


Mrs. M. L. Scudder 


1975 


Mr. Edwin H. Damon. Jr. 


1974 



Second Row fl-rj 
Mr. Ray Broekel 
Mr. Edward J. Miction 
Mr. Paul K. Gahm 
Mr. Walter J. Pojasek 



Term Expires 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1974 




46 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Mr. John H. Stella 

On October 1, 1972 the total school enrollment was 
2727, a decrease of 74 as compared to October 1, 
1971. In my opinion, this one year decrease is not valid 
to indicate a trend. We are continuing to rent the 
Boone Hall facility to accommodate 110 students and 
the Baptist Church where 39 students attend classes. 

School housing continues to be a problem and in the 
latter part of the year the proposed new high school 
was shelved and several alternatives are being considered 
by the School Committee to solve the space problems. 

On October 28, 1972 the school administrative 
offices were moved to the remodeled Payne School 
Building on 1 Lord Square. The town meeting action 
approved the cost of the necessary alterations and work 
was begun on June 22, 1972. The cost of the project 
was $49,728.00. The facilities are excellent and during 
Open House the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools heard many favorable 
comments. Site improvement is planned during the 
Spring of 1973. Mr. Charles Goodhue, Jr. and Mr. 
William Hayes suggested the use of the Payne School 
for administrative offices and the conference room in 
the Payne School Building is named the Charles E. 
Goodhue, Jr. Conference Room in honor of his 
memory. 

During the past year as a result of legislation Chapter 
95 of the acts of 1972 a Student Advisory School 
Committee was formed at the High School and a 
student, Scott Bouranis, who was elected by the student 
body, sits in when the School Committee meets and 
serves in an advisory capacity. The Student Advisory 
School Committee will meet with the School Committee 
every other month as specified in the recent legislation. 

In order to improve communication between the 
home and the school the administration initiated a 
Parents Advisory Council. Each school under the 
leadership of the Principal, meets regularly with this 
group and from all indications it appears that the bond 
between the home and the school has been 
strengthened. I encourage more parents to participate in 
these meetings in order to conduct a meaningful 
dialogue with school authorities in interpreting the 
educational program to insure a more effective 
understanding between the school and the home. 

During the past year Collective Bargaining 
negotiations consumed many hours of the School 
Committee and the Superintendent of Schools. The 
cafeteria employees and the custodians are now 
represented by the AFL-CIO, STate Council 41, Local 
1098. The teachers' negotiations were settled on 
September 29, 1972 after many months of sessions. These 
negotiations, complex as they are, require the services of 
a qualified and experienced labor relations attorney who 
has been serving the School Committee and the Town for 
the past several years. 

The Whittier Regional Vocational and Technical High 
School plans to open its doors in September 1973. 
Ipswich is eligible to send 10% of the total capacity of 
Whittier or 150-180 students. For the past several months 
the Ipswich Public Schools have implemented under the 




Pupil Personnel Services Department a most 
comprehensive program to motivate, familiarize our 
students, both boys and girls, to attend the Whittier 
School where approximately forty-five programs will be 
offered. We shall continue to mass our resources to 
encourage our full quota to attend Whittier although as of 
January 15, 1973 we did not have 150 students 
expressing their intent to enroll at Whittier in the Fall. 

The operational date of Whittier in September 1973 
means that our town has a very substantial financial 
commitment to the Whittier School. Ipswich's financial 
participation amounts to approximately $600,000.00 for 
the next 18 months. These monies coupled with the 18 
month budget of the town will reflect in a heavy burden 
upon all of us and the School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools and other town officials are 
deeply concerned and are attempting to find some 
remedies to reduce this heavy financial commitment upon 
the taxpayers of Ipswich. 

During the last year Mrs. Mary Evans, Director of 
Elementary Education retired. We appreciate her long and 
dedicated service to the children of the Ipswich Public 
Schools and her contribution to the educational program 
at the Elementary level. 

The School Committee broadened the scope of this 
position and created the new position of Director of 
Curriculum, Kindergarten through Grade 12. 

The reports from the principals of the schools and the 
supervisors are included for your consideration. 

I extend to the School Committee my sincere 
appreciation for the many hours they have spent in 
negotiations and for their untiring devotion and 
dedication to meeting the educational needs of our young 
people. 

I extend to the administrators, teachers, custodians, 
secretaries, cafeteria workers, and all others my sincere 
appreciation for their excellent cooperation. Finally I 
extend to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Police, 
Highway, Fire Departments and other town officials my 
sincere appreciation for their excellent cooperation with 
the schools. 



47 



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For a change of pace, High 
School Principal Joe Rogers 
instructs students in culinary 
arts. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 



HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 
Joseph Rogers 

Enrollment Boys 

Grade 9 98 

Grade 10 106 

Grade 11 96 

Grade 12 96 
Post-Graduate 

Totals 396 

I. Staff 



Girls 

101 
107 



81 

1 

401 



Total 

199 
213 
207 
177 

1 

797 



Due to a stable enrollment figure, no additional 
personnel was required, except in the area of specific 
learning disabilities. Since the State Department of 
Education is requiring all schools to provide educational 
opportunities for all pupils, we in Ipswich are extending 
the traditional secondary school curriculum to include 
special programs for exceptional children; thus there was 
the need to employ a teacher to aid pupils with specific 
learning disabilities. 

Thirteen teachers were hired to replace those who 
resigned and retired. Due to the abundance of candidates, 
we were able to be highly selective in screening and 
appointment. Most new teachers hold the master's degree 
and have benefited from advanced study, extensive travel 
and teaching experience. 

Our staff consists of a principal, an assistant principal, 
fifty-eight teachers and three counselors. In addition, 
visiting specialists include a part-time school nurse, 
part-time physician, part-time psychologist and part-time 
art instructor. The Director of Pupil Personnel Services is 
housed in the high school. We are lacking specialists in 
reading and speech therapy. 

II. Pupil Personnel 

This past year brought several "firsts'" to our school. 
In order to develop communications and understanding 
within the school and between school and the 
community, we have a student representative to the 
School Committee and both student and parent advisory 
boards to the school. 

Lack of space continues to be a major problem. There 
are times when the corridors and cafeteria are too 
crowded for pupil safety. The school was designed for 
650 students and is now accommodating 800. While self 



discipline, self-direction and intelligent decision making 
are goals we have set, much direction and imposed 
discipline is still necessary. 

Our time schedule is staggered so that juniors and 
seniors begin their day at 7:40 a.m. and finish after four 
or five classes. Since freshmen and sophomores must 
remain in school for seven periods, their day begins at 
9:27 and ends at 3:30 p.m. 

Food is available to students from 7:30 to 2:30; this 
includes breakfast, lunch and snacks. 

III. Curriculum 

Through the efforts of an ad hoc committee, we are 
utilizing the physical facility to nearly 100 per cent 
capacity. This committee, made up of parents, pupils and 
teachers, investigated every possibility for greater use of 
our building. It presented and implemented a nine period 
day lasting from 7:40 to 3:30. We are working under this 
plan for the second year. It is somewhat fruitful, yet 
presents many problems which are inevitable with an 
inadequate physical plant. 

While we have been able to offer a variety of electives 
in grades ten through twelve, we are still sadly lacking 
space to accommodate a truly good secondary school 
program. Little or no provision has been made for art, 
music or drama. 

Open Campus and Maximum Education Programs have 
extended our curriculum beyond the confines of the 
building. Under the supervision of Mrs. Mary Lou Sherr, 
our students have been presented with a multiplicity of 
opportunities in addition to the regular school curriculum 
to pursue individual interests, career possibilities and 
cultural experiences. Museum exhibits, contemporary and 
classical musical groups, lectures, educational trips and 
discussions of current controversial issues are all part of 
our program of curriculum expansion. 

Our program of studies is varied, current and, 
hopefully, meaningful to our students. We are constantly 
seeking better, more enlightening and stimulating courses 
and the methods and materials with which to teach them. 
Our elective system allows students to explore academic 
disciplines which were previously not available due to a 
rigid track system of college, business and technical 
courses ot study. Teacher and pupil reaction to such 
electives have proven both positive and educationally 



48 



sound. However, severe lack of space has prevented the 
much needed expansion in our art, music and dramatics 
programs. Other extreme inadequacies exist in physical 
education and athletic locker room space. 

IV. Building and Grounds 

Regular use of the building, due to the extended 
school day, adult education and summer school places a 
heavy burden on the budget. 

Unusually heavy use of the building and maintenance 
of poorly designed equipment have caused us to spend 
unprecedented amounts of money in up-keep and repairs. 

Pumps which are used to force sewage on to High 
Street and then to the treatment plan have caused much 
expense and many problems. An alarm system has been 
designed to alert the Police Department when a problem 
of flooding exists; however, this system should be 
completely re-designed to assure trouble-free waste 
disposal. 



Resurfacing of all approaches and parking areas is an 
absolute must; the original paving was very poor and, 
after nine years of use, we are encountering constant 
problems with pot holes, cracks and erosion. Despite 
excellent co-operation from all town departments in 
assessing our needs and aiding us in our attempts to 
maintain buildings and grounds, the situation remains 
crucial. 

V. Conclusion 

While we continue to grow educationally through a 
series of innovative and imaginative programs, we are still 
badly lacking in many areas. The coming academic year 
of 1973-1974 will determine the direction of our growth 
pattern. The Whittier Vocational-Technical School may 
relieve some of the pressure for space - just how much is 
purely speculative. However, even with the loss of fifty to 
one hundred pupils, we will still be unable to provide for 
our pupils in many areas; namely, physical education, 
locker room space, adequate grounds maintenance, music' 
art and drama. 



* 



* 




RALPH C. WHIPPLE 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

John Huttenan 



Organization 

The enrollment figures for the 1972-73 school year as 
of our October 1st State Report are as follows: 



Grade 7 


213 


Grade 8 


230 


Total 


443 



Programs and Curriculum 

Our program of elective courses has continued to be 
well received by the students. Currently, students have an 
opportunity to enroll in electives during study periods 
and two activity periods which are held during the week. 
The electives run for half the school year at which time 
new selections are made. During the first half of the 
1972-73 school year thirty-five different electives were 
offered to the students. 

This year we have introduced the ISCS (intermediate 
Science Curriculum Study) program at the seventh grade 



level. This program stresses the investigatory or lab 
approach. Each student has an opportunity to work on 
experiments during class and to record his findings. It is 
felt that the students will enjoy science to a greater 
degree, will learn to work in a more scientific manner, 
and will develop a more in-depth understanding of the 
material presented. Next year provisions are being made 
to extend the program into the eighth grade. 

In preparation for the introduction of the program at 
our school, the science teachers attended a workshop in 
Foxboro during the last week of June. In addition, the 
teachers had an opportunity to visit other schools such as 
Newton and North Reading to see the program in action. 

During this year's budget deliberations the school 
committee will be asked to approve an additional music 
teacher to improve our instrumental music program 
(currently our students travel to the high school for 
instrumental music). In addition, we are requesting that 
our two physical education teachers be kept at the Junior 
High full time. Currently, each teacher spends 
approximately two and a half days at the elementary level 
and two and a half days at the Junior High School. This 
would allow us to improve our physical education 
program by: 1) reducing class sizes, 2) giving opportunity 
for individualized or small group instruction for those with 
physical handicaps, and 3) providing a health education 
program with instruction in first aid, safety, hygiene, etc. 

This year Spanish is being offered at the junior high 
level. Mr. Joseph Joaquin, language teacher, has two 
classes of converstational Spanish. Until this year French 
was the only foreign language offered. 

Conclusion 

I would again like to thank the superintendent, school 
committee, and community for the support given to the 
educational programs and needs of Ralph C. Whipple 
Memorial School. In particular, I would like to thank the 
parents who have served on our parents council and who 
are serving on various committees for self evaluation and 
improvement of the school. 



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PAUL F. DOYON 
MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

William E. Waitt, Jr., 
Principal 

During 1972 Doyon School continued to move toward 
individualized instruction at a rate commensurate with the 
ability of the staff and students to adjust to the new 
ideas, methods and materials. Perfoimance objectives have 
been completed in the areas of mathematics and reading. 

Organization 

The school continues to operate as in 1971 as a seven 
year (K-6) elementary school, with three sections of each 
grade (1-6) and three sections of special education for 
children with special needs, and four section of 
kindergarten. Enrollment from January to June averaged 
532 students. 

In September the school opened its doors with 540 
students housed as above with the exception of the 
reduction of one section of kindergarten because of a 
decrease in enrollment at that level. 

Teaching Personnel 

Mrs. Rose Merry, one of the original staff members, 
retired with nearly forty years service to the children of 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Merry came to Ipswich when the 
Winthrop School opened its doors in 1956. She is missed 
by students, staff and administration. 

Cheryl Southworth, kindergarten teacher, was 
transferred to Burley School and four other staff 
members resigned. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Geanakakis, our Guidance Counselor 
and Coordinator of Special Classes was granted a leave of 
absence to spend a year working with the State 
Department of Education. 



During the summer, replacements were found for the 
kindergarten, two fourth grades, two fifth grades, the Art 
teacher and for Guidance. 

The staff, all experienced and holding state certificates, 
consists of thirty-five full and part time teachers and 
specialists. Sixteen staff members have tenure with five 
more slated for tenure this year. Seven first year and 
seven second year teachers complete the staff. Eight staff 
members have earned Masters Degrees. Three full time 
teacher aides were added to our Special Education 
Department in September. (One paid with Title VI 
funds). 

Curriculum 

Work continues on developing individualized 
mathematics, reading and social studies. A new health 
program was introduced in September to implement our 
health curriculum and our primary grades were introduced 
to the S.C.I .S. science program with the aid of federal 
funds. Grade two continued the new social studies pilot 
program, and also began the Harcourt reading program. 

General 

In January the Parent Advisory group was established 
to add to the communication link between home and 
school. I believe this group has added to the quality of 
school life, and hold great hopes for future success. 

Mr. Armand Brouilette, our Head Custodian, retired in 
June after a long illness. Mr. Brouilette was appointed to 
the staff in early 1965 to watch over the school as it 
grew. We wish him a long, happy retirement. He was 
replaced in September by Mr. Joseph Dupray of High 
Street. 

The staff has been supplemented by eight student 
teachers from Gordon College and Salem State College, 
by undergraduate students from Gordon, and our own 
High School, also by three aides in training from the 
North Shore Community College teacher aide program. 

Some twenty mothers also aid in our library program, 
maintaining our excellent collection of books. 

For the first time, twelve mothers aided teachers in 
classroom instruction by becoming unpaid volunteer aides. 

Mr. Taplin, our sixth grade teacher was honored this 
fall when he was elected to serve a term as President of 
the Ipswich Teachers Association. 



* 



* 




WINTHROP AND 
BAPTIST SCHOOLS 

Samuel B. Levy, 
Principal 



Organization: 



This year the Winthrop Elementary School comprises 
two buildings; the Baptist School classes and the 
Winthrop School. The Baptist School houses two fourth 
grades having an enrollment of 39 students as of 
December 22, 1972. The Winthrop School houses four 
classes of grade six. The total enrollment for both 
buildings is 403 students. The Winthrop School houses a 
resource center containing a library of over 6,300 volumes 
which include reference works as well as general reading 
material appropriate to the age and interest level of the 
student body. Film, audio and visual materials are also 
available for individual and group research work. 

Various interest and activity groups are available to the 
students with staff members serving as leaders and 
advisors. An active student council represents all 
classrooms. 



50 



The school day for all students is six hours and fifteen 
minutes. Class "A" lunches are served to the student 
body. School bus transportation is provided for 178 
students or 44% of the student population. 

Our facilities and equipment are used by many school, 
civic, church and private group functions and activities 
during after-school afternoon, evening and weekend hours. 
Organizations using these facilities include Girl Scouts, 
Square Dance Clubs, Boy Scouts, Church Fellowship 
Groups, Conservation Activities and High School and 
Junior High School car washes and Greek School classes. 

Curriculum: 

The Winthrop School provides a standard elementary 
school curriculum with a flexible structure. Staff members 
are using imaginative and innovative approaches to the 
curriculum to enliven the student's interest in their 
education. 

Specialists provide instruction in the area of art, music, 
and French. French instruction is given to all grade six 
classes four times each week. Physical education is carried 
on for two periods each week. Instrumental music lessons 
are provided to over 150 students. There is an active 
chorus of 75 boys and girls from grades five and six. 
Provisions are made for students requiring services in the 
area of specific learning disabilities and speech therapy. 
The Winthrop School participated in a Title I Project 



which provided three trained Teacher Aides to work in 
the area of learning disabilities. The school library is 
supervised by a librarian who is shared with the Doyon 
School and a corps of dedicated volunteer librarians. 

Teaching Personnel: 

The Winthrop-Baptist School staff is made up of 
seventeen classroom teachers plus vocal music, 
instrumental music, art and French teacher shared with 
other schools, a full-time specific learning disabilities 
specialist and a part-time speech therapist. The school also 
has the services of a full time guidance counselor, a 
part-time guidance specialist and- a consulting 
psychologist. The school participates in the 
teacher-training programs with Gordon and Salem State 
College. 

Many staff members are doing post graduate work at 
Boston and area colleges and universities. All the staff is 
involved regularly in scheduled workshops in the areas of 
curriculum development, individualized instruction, math 
and music. Three of our staff members are new to 
Ipswich this year. 

A nurse, a secretary, two full-time custodians, two 
lunchroom aides and five cafeterial workers complete the 
Winthrop School staff plus a lunchroom aide shared with 
other schools and a custodian servicing the Baptist. 



* 



* 



BURLEY, SHATSWELL AND BOONE HALL 

Mrs. Marcia J. Fowler, Principal 

Personnel 

Burley, Shatswell and Boone Hall are primary level 
schools. Together they employ 20 classroom teachers, 13 
shared teaching specialists in the areas of Reading, 
Perceptually Handicapped, Special Needs, Art, Music, 
Physical Education, Speech and Guidance, 6 lunch aides, 
1 part-time and 2 full-time custodians, 1 secretary, and 1 
part-time nurse. 

Organization 

These three schools are organized to facilitate the 
unique learning nature of each child within his total 
world by adapting the instruction and scheduling to him. 
They offer both traditional graded classrooms with 
individualized expectations and open classes with 
non-graded individualized instruction. 

Children change rooms and teachers at times to receive 
lessons and practice with specific skills and to enable 
them to receive their instruction in the style and 
environment most suitable to their learning comfort and 
efficiency. These exchanges are flexible in duration and 
are arranged among classroom teachers and specialists as a 
result of repeated observations of the child's daily 
performance. 

It is important for the home and school worlds of the 
primary child to be compatable. For this reason parents 
were asked to express a preference for either open 
classroom or a traditional classroom environment for their 



children. As a result of a combination of parental choice 
and school recommendation, children at the three schools 
were placed in classrooms as follows: 



BURLEY 

2 Kindergarten sessions a.m. and p.m. 
1 First grade — traditional 
1 Second grade — traditional 

1 Third grade — traditional 

2 First-Second combinations — open 
2 Second-Third combinations — open 

BOONE HALL 

2 Kindergarten sessions amjn and p.m. 
1 First grade — traditional 
1 Second grade — traditional 

1 Third grade — traditional 

SHATSWELL 

2 Kindergarten sessions a.m. and p.m. 
4 Second-Third combinations — open 

3 First-Second combinations — open 



Consequently this primary district has been composed 
of eleven open and seven traditional classrooms. 

Curriculum 

This year the formal physical education instruction 
time has been doubled so that each child in primary 
school has received one-half (H) hour of physical 
education instruction twice a week. For the first time our 
kindergarten children were also included in formal 
physical skills development lessons. The emphasis in this 
area was in skills development and nourishment of pride 
in personal growth and physical well being as well as 



51 



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motivating the joy of physical activity. Competitive games 
were not stressed but were offered for those who were 
ready for them both physically and emotionally. Coach 
Welch and Miss Ellie Knowles have worked effectively to 
establish many extras in this area to individualize the 
instruction. It is with their coordination with Mrs. Sherr 
and Mr. Rogers that High School Open Campus students 
volunteered many hours of tutoring to Shatswell School 
children to motivate an interest that many children might 
not have had. 

As a result of math workshop during the summer of 
1972 under the direction of Mrs. Mary Evans, Director of 
Elementary Education and Miss Barbara Beaman, primary 
teacher, the math curriculum in each of the schools has 
been clarified with the designing of a behavioral objectives 
skills list which has been used as the core and has been 
implimented with a multi text approach. Children began 
with many activities which promoted concept 
development through manipulating concrete materials. 
Simultaneously, they engaged in extensive oral expression 
of these concepts. Ultimately, they finalized their 
understanding with written articulation of the 
mathematical concepts and participated in a variety of 
practice activities to ensure that the facts remained for 
future use. 

Instruction in reading has been personalized so that 
each child has received the method of instruction and 



practice most suitable for him. Instructional reading has 
been accomplished through the use of Open Court, 
Programmed Reading, Barnell Loft, and S.R.A. materials. 

This year we have increased the amount of functional 
reading to solidify the instructional reading skills. If you 
had walked through any part of the three schools you 
would have seen children using their instructional reading 
skills independently or with friends to enable them to do 
many independent activities and projects in the areas of 
crafts, construction, cooking, science experiments, social 
studies field work, measurement, physical skills and 
music. Reading has been a necessary part of living, even 
in the primary grades. The children have been discovering 
that if they could read it, they could do it. 

Happily the philosophy of expression of individual 
gifts has overflowed into areas of special instruction. 
Recognizing its worth with teachers as well as with 
children has encouraged the development of a special 
program in music, at Shatswell School Mrs. Rita Holland, 
has designed and incorporated an individualized 
developmental skills program in music which combines 
singing, playing bells, autoharps and rhythm band 
instruments, reading music, orchestration and creating 
original pieces. Mrs. Holland's creativity has motivated 
much interest in music and has established a way for 
teaching music within an open classroom organization. 




* 



DIRECTOR OF PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 
Mr. Joseph Battaglio 

Programs for the education of children with special 
needs came under special scrutiny this year. As the result 
of new regulations issued jointly by the Massachusetts 
Departments of Education and Mental Health, the 
responsibility for initiating programs for handicapped 
children falls squarely upon school districts in each 
community of the Commonwealth. 

What this - means essentially is that the relative 
permissiveness of the General Laws which allowed 
communities to implement programs at will has been 



replaced by specific guidlines and requirements which 
must be complied with by certain deadlines. Beginning 
with mental retardation, each school district by March, 
1972, was accountable for submitting an appropriate 
program for each child who falls within this category. 

In Ipswich, the accounting procedure which was to 
precede the March report, and which encompassed an 
annual town census of handicapped children, was already 
complete. The mandatory provision to provide school 
programs for children so identified was already being 
complied with. The additional provision to eliminate 
segregating and categorizing procedures within such school 
programs is a long-standing policy in Ipswich. First 
attempts to integrate children with special needs into 
regular classrooms began approximately six years ago. 

Another major aspect of the new regulations — and 
one with strong financial implications for school systems 
— was the provision for extensive evaluation procedures 
for children with special needs. Components include: 

1. An assessment of each child's current educational 
status. Required personnel: a specialist certified by the 
Department of Education (certified special education 
teacher). 

2. A medical assessment. Required personnel: a physician, 
preferably to be a pediatrician. 

3. A psychological assessment. Required personnel: a 
psychologist. 

4. An assessment of pertinent family history including a 
home visit. Required personnel: school counselor, 
school adjustment counselor, school nurse, or school 
social worker. 



52 



Since all the components specified are contained 
within the existing pupil personnel framework in Ipswich, 
the implications of this feature of the regulations for our 
school system were minimal. 

The core evaluation team for the first evaluations 
(children in partially integrated programs) consisted of 
Mrs. Carol Barry, special education teacher; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Geanakakis, counselor and special education supervisor; 
Dr. Marsh, pediatrician; Dr. Gofstein, psychologist; and J. 
Battaglio, superintendent's designee. 

As a result of existing programs and policies, we had 
little trouble meeting the March 1st deadline as specified. 

Looking ahead, we can expect additional regulations to 
result from a new law (Chapter 766). This will apply 
similar requirements for school programs to meet the 
needs of children in all disability categories. In light of 
existing programs, it would seem that Ipswich has a head 
start in meeting the provisions of the new law. But a head 
start does not imply full compliance which must be 
reached by 1974. By that time we must implement 
programs for the special needs of all our handicapped 
children. Failure to do so will not only place us at odds 
with the law, but will also jeopardize reimbursements to 
Ipswich for five years. Under a new formula in the law, 
these reimbursements, which will total $79,167 for 1972, 
will reach 100 per cent of expenditures in excess of 
regular costs for each child in a special program. 

The following overview of existing programs and needs 
points up our position relative to the requirements of the 
new law: 

I. Mental Retardation 

A. Present programs: 

1. Primary elementary — 3 classes 

2. Intermediate elementary - none 

3. Junior High School - one class 

4. High School - one class. 

II. Emotional Disturbance 

A. Present programs - one class for one elementary 
district. 

B. Needs 

1. An extension of the program to serve the 
Winthrop-Shatswell schools (Boone-Baptist) 



III. 



IV. 



2. An extension of services for students at the 
secondary level. 
Physical Disabilities 
A. No formal programs. 
B Needs - a physical therapist (full or part-time) to 

provide individualized therapy to handicapped children 

K-12. 
Speech Handicaps 



A. 



one therapist to serve 
with speech impediments 



all elementary 
(total - 136 



VI. 



Program 

children 

children). 
B. Needs - one additional therapist to provide services for 

children now on a waiting list in the elementary 

program, and to take referrals of students from the 

Junior-Senior High Schools. 
Specific Learning Disabilities 

A. Programs 

1. At all elementary schools (Burley, Winthrop, and 
Shatswell - one person serves as SLD and reading 
consultant - see Remedial Reading) 

2. Secondary schools - one learning disabilities 
specialist for both schools. 

B. Needs - one certified learning disabilities teacher to 
broaden existing programs. 

Remedial Reading 

A. Programs 

1. One remedial reading teacher for the Doyon 
School 

2. All other elementary schools (Winthrop, 
Shatswell, Boone, Burley, Baptist) - one specialist 
attempts to provide both remedial reading and 
SLD services 

3. Junior High School - none 

4. Senior High School - none. 

B . Needs - One remedial reading reacher for the secondary 
schools. 

VII. Health - coverage for all schools provided by three school 
physicians and three nurses (full and part-time) 

VIII. Psychological Services - coverage for all schools provided by 
one clinical psychologist for one-half day per week. 

Needs - extended time for current consultant. 

IX. Visual and Auditory Defects — specialized prescriptions for 
each child as needed. Includes tutoring, special 
transportation, evaluations and placements. 



Summary 



Ipswich can take pride in its leadership in the area of 
special programs for its school children. We must continue 
to recognize our responsibility to provide appropriate 
programs as new needs arise, and as new legislation 
dictates. 



* 



$* Ir^Tl 



The elementary schools are continuing to extend 
individualized learning programs in all areas of the 
curriculum. Teachers in a primary level summer workshop 

- an extension of in-service work during the school year 

- prepared a guide complete with objectives, resources, 
and record keeping device for all pupils and teachers in 
the primary units. Middle grade teachers are in the 
process of preparing a similar guide for grades 4, 5, and 6. 

Again this year, federal grants under Title III NDEA 
providing matching funds for improving science, 
mathematics, and music programs were obtained. A Title 
I ESEA grant has provided three instructional aides for 
the reading program at the Winthrop-Baptist Schools. 

Mrs. Rita Holland, Music Specialist at the 
Winthrop-Shatswell Schools, is receiving the cooperation 
of the Mass. Dept. of Education in developing 
individualization of the music program for open 
education. The initial steps in this development, presented 
at the Mass. Music Educators Conference in October, were 
enthusiastically received by the participants. 




DIRECTOR OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Mary M. Evans 



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As preparation for the Health Education program, 
introduced at the elementary level in the Fall of '72, 
workshops were provided for all elementary teachers. This 
program is in accord with recently published Guidelines 
and Curriculum of the Mass. Dept. of Education. 

Continuing the efforts begun last year, fourteen cities 
and towns in the area formed a collaborative to obtain a 
planning grant under Title III ESEA (innovative 
programs). A proposal was submitted and approved for a 
Common Concerns Collaborative on Open Education 
(C3OH) which will evantually provide resources, teacher 
education, and limited funding for the implementation of 
Open Education. Ipswich was involved in the proposal 
through the efforts of Henry Dembowski and Mary M. 
Evans. Marcia Fowler succeeds Henry Dembowski as a 
member of the executive committee of C3OE. This 
collaborative will afford Ipswich the opportunity of 
having expert assistance in developing outstanding 
educational programs for students. 

Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, because of the high 
quality of reading instruction in the first grade at Doyon 
School, has extended the pilot program to grade two. The 
publisher supplied all new basic material as well as 
consultant service to the teachers at no cost to the town. 



It is encouraging to note the interest in the arts that 
has been generated by special as well as classroom 
teachers. These special teachers are to be commended for 
the scope of their offerings. 

The addition of one staff member has had an impact 
on the quantity as well as the quality of the physical 
education program. The facilities, however, for a really 
comprehensive program at the elementary level remain 
totally Inadequate. 

We have continued as part of the North Shore 
Regional Teacher Aide Training Program held at North 
Shore Community College. Six Ipswich residents attended 
the required courses during the summer of 1972 and are 
completing the required practicum of seventy-five hours 
in elementary classrooms. 

In submitting this annual report, which is my last as 
Director of Elementary Education, to you, the citizens of 
Ipswich, I wish to express my sincere thanks to all of you 
who counselled, advised, and supported my efforts toward 
quality education for the young people of Ipswich and to 
express the hope that your concern will continue. 



* 



ENROLLMENT CHART 



* 



Grade 


K 


Doyon 
Burley 
Shatswell 


55 
37 
38 


Boone Hall 


41 


Baptist 
Winthrop 
Junior High 




Senior High 




TOTAL 


171 


Grade 


1967 


K 


71 


Nongraded Primary 
1 


190 


2 


188 


3 


202 


4 


196 


5 


188 


6 


203 


7 


187 


8 


191 


9 


191 


10 


189 


11 


135 


12 


122 


P.G. 


1 


Sp. Ed. 
TOTALS 


31 

2285 



1 

w 

48 
42 
24 



2 

77 

52 

72 

19 



3 

89 
62 
72 
27 



4 

84 



5 
74 



6 

75 



38 

92 150 128 



OCTOBER 2, 1972 

Sp. 
7 8 9 10 11 12 P.G. Ed. TOTAL 

19 542 

199 

224 

111 

38 

370 

213 224 6 443 

200 213 210 177 1 801 



171 183 220 250 214 224 203 213 224 200 213 210 177 1 25 



ENROLLMENT CHART BY GRADES 1967 - 1972 





1968 1969 




1970 




206 216 




187 
204 




200 225 




159 




190 229 




122 




193 188 




235 




211 195 




203 




204 214 




206 




198 218 




225 




219 226 




216 




180 228 




217 




185 185 




220 




189 195 




180 




198 183 




197 




133 185 




174 




2 1 




2 




23 27 




27 




2531 2715 




2774 




EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES 






ISSUED TO MINORS 1972 






Age 


Age 






14-16 


16-18 


Toti 


Boys 


13 


28 


41 


Girls 


7 


33 


40 



1971 

164 
276 

97 
141 
185 
239 
210 
213 
228 
215 
213 
218 
177 
198 
1 

27 
2802 



2728 



1972 
171 

183 
220 
250 
214 
224 
203 
213 
224 
200 
213 
210 
177 
1 
25 
2728 



54 



PROGRAM 



* 



PROCESSIONAL 

INVOCATION 

VALEDICTORIAN 

SALUTATORIAN 

A.F.S. STUDENT FROM FINLAND 

HONORS SPEAKER 

A.F.S. STUDENT FROM ST. MICHAEL, AZORES 

MUSICAL SELECTIONS BY THE I.H.S. CHORUS 

O. Bone Jesu 

Because All Men Are Brothers 

God Bless The Child 

Alleluia 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS & PRIZES 
PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

STAR SPANGLED BANNER 

BENEDICTION 

RECESSIONAL 



Mrs. Joanne McMahon 

Rev. John E. Jusseaume 

Charles E. Kanozak 

Sally A. Coates (in absentia) 

Auni Kostilainen 

John M. Curran 

Jose Francisco da Encarnacao Xavier 

G. Palestrina 

J. S. Bach 

Billy Holiday 

William Boyce 

John H. Stella 

Joseph R. Rogers, Principal 

Mary Louise Scudder, Chairwoman 

Ipswich School Committee 

Entire Assembly 

Rev. Edward French 

Mrs. Joanne McMahon 



f* Maria Angelakis 

* Ruthanne Eleanor Appleton 
Carol Ann Austin 

Linda Christine Belbute 
Susan Jean Benedetto 
f * Stephanie Bouzianis 
Susan L. Duke Bronk 
Suzanne Brouillette 
Paula Marie Bruni 

* Joan Gail Budzinski 
Jeanette Ann Bullock 

* Linda Ann Burke 
Vicki Jo Buttrick 

* Cynthia Jean Campbell 
Pamela Ann Carter 
Paula Jean Chouinard 
Christine Christopher 
Laura Hazel Cleary 

* Sally Anne Coates 
Janice Lee Colter 
Kathleen Frances Coolidge 
Linda Jill Cooper 

C. Ann Dempsey 
Susan Marie Desmond 

* Dianne Linnea DiLisio 
Deborah C. Dionne 

* Rebecca Jane Dolan 

+ Mugette Douglas Alder 
Sherry Anne Duff 
Shirley M. Ewing 

* Claudia Ramona Fido 

* Susan Patricia Francis 
Janie Galanis 

Mary Alice Graffum 
Patricia Ann Gray 
Lynne Anne Hansbury 

* Donna Lee Harrington 

* Jennifer Joan Harwood 
Mary Constance Hennessey 
Meredith Hood 

Marcia Ann Hopping 
Kathryn Ruth Huff 
Carole Ann Hunter 
Lynne Anne Johnson 

* Deborah Lynne Johnstone 
Joyce Valerie Kasprzyk 

t* Janet Lynne Kenney 



Auni Marja Kostilainen 

* Cheryl Ann Krajeski 
Sheila Langmaid 
Debra Ann Laterowicz 

* Joanne Marie LeClair 
Bonnie Heather Leet 

f* Michelle Denise Marcorelle 
Deborah Leslie Marshall * 

* Susan Justine Marshall 

* Diane Jane Marvin * 
Deborah Anne Masse 
Allison Monroe Mitchell 
Denise Emma Moynahan 

* Norine Linda Mozdziez * 

* Christina Louise Naoum 
Donna Madelyne Newcomb 

f* Patricia Eileen Nicholson 

Elaine Louise Nirider 

Margaret Pearse 

Robin Marie Pearse 
t* Marylou Pells * 

* Brenda Mildred Penniman 

* Jan Pickard * 
Sandra Plotner 

Pamela J. Purington * 

Holly Rand 

Mary Julie Rathe 

Robin Marie Therese Reagen 

Mary Richards 

Marsha Lorraine Riedel 

* Elise Maria Rogers 
Holly Elizabeth Rousseau 
Deborah Ann Rygielski 

* Kim Elizabeth Sears 

* Cynthia Denise Sheppard 
Susan Jane Singer 
Andrey Sowell 

Jane Abeel Spencer 

* Charlene Strok 
Lori Jean Sukach 

f* Jean Theresa Sullivan 

Susan Anne Thatcher 
f* Karen Theodosopoulos 

Deborah Diane Todd 

* Kathryn Valerie Tolios 

* Charlotte Lee Virgin 



Catherine Lee Wade 

Rosemary Ellen Watson 

JoAnn L. Wentworth +* 

Dawn Frances Whiston + 

Catherine E. Winters 

Jeneth Lynn Wurdack 

Portia J. Yarfellow 

Gail Maria Zawacki 

Paula Jane Zervas 

Lou Ann Ziebell +* 

Dawn Leslie Radicky Zulutka 

Peter Nicholas Argeropoulos 

Terry Lee Atkinson 

Richard Eugene Auclair 

J. William Bamford 

Thomas Beaupre * 

Dale A. Bertocci ■(■* 

Peter Richard Beyer * 

J. Scott Blessington f* 

Ronald S. Bresse 

James Burnham 

Thomas John Carroll 

John Robert Crawford, Jr. 

John Michael Curran 

Craig A. Curtis 

James Peter Demetrakopoulos * 

Charles Wellington Dort III 

John Francis Doyon 

Kenneth Edward Eby 

Kevin Farina 

Richard Paul Farina + 

Richard Faulconer * 

David Foote 

Donald Allen Freeman 

Frederick James Ford 

John Louis Galanis 

John William Galanis 

Gregory Gianakakis 

Wayne Richard Gibbs 

John Cameron Goodhue 

John Casimir Gorniewicz 

Robert F. Greenhalgh 

Michael Sean Griffin 

Daniel Dwight Hammett 

Jeffrey Howard Hardy 

Paul Hinckley 

David Hopping 



* 



t 

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Robert James Howarth 
Stephen Paul Joslin 
Charles Edward Kanozak 
Robert A. La Brie 
Daniel E. La Rochelle 
Michael Edward Lezon 
Richard C. MacWhinnie, Jr. 
Steven R. Makar 
Brandon Michael Malek 
John McLain Malek 
Blair Andrew Marcaurelle 
Roy A. Marcaurelle 
J. Deric Marcorelle 
Edmund James Markewicz 
William John Markos 
John James Mavraides 
George W. Mavroides 
Michael James McKay 
Bruce Converse McKinney 
William McLeod 
James Michael McParland 
David George Mollica 
Christopher Ralph Pedrick 
Jeffrey Noel Phaneuf 
Keith Dodge Pierce 
Peter Whitney Preston 
Theodore Michael Putur, Jr. 
Dean Wendell Rand 
David William Reynolds 
Guy Benjamin Saulnier 
Charles Miner Thompson 
Gary Hall Tougas 
Charles Jerome Trombley 
Stephen Mark Turner 
John Van Horn 
John Edward Wallace 
Frederick Wegzyn 
Rusty Albert Whitcomb 
Jeffrey James White 
Richard Cregg Wilson 
Douglas Woodworth 
Jose Francisco da 

Encarnacao Xavier 
Stephen George Wright 

Honors 

Member of National Honor Society 

In absentia 



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Sarah L. Weatherall, Chairman 
Dr. Robert Goodale 
William C. Hickling, Jr. 
Frederick Winthrop, Jr. 
Costos Tsoutsouras 
Andrew Connors 
William George 

1972 was a year of action for your Conservation 
Commission in fulfilling its charge of preserving the 
Town's natural resources and improving the environment. 
Some of the highlights follow: 

To provide additional protection to the Dow Brook 
reservoir, the Commission initiated and with the Town 
meeting approval purchased 67 acres at the head of 
reservoir. The Commission also applied to the 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources for 
self-help funds from their "Self Help Program". Final 
approval has been received and 50% of purchase price of 
these lands will be reimbursed to the Town treasury. 
Dedication of the property was held on April 29 in 
conjunction with Earth Day. 

The Town again was most fortunate through the 
efforts of the Commission in receiving gifts of two parcels 
of land. They were the Tom Foley parcel on Jeffrey's 
Neck Road and the Dorothy (Harrold) Green property on 
Peatfield Street. The latter property, located on the 
Ipswich River, is being landscaped and will be used as a 
canoe landing and passive recreation area. Back taxes due 
on the Peatfield Street property were paid to the Town 
from the "Conservation Fund". The deeds to these 
properties were properly executed and now Town 
property under the management and control of the 
Conservation Commission. 

To facilitate the development of the Peatfield Street 
property-razing the old Harrold house and landscaping - 
a dance was cosponsored by the immediate community 
and the Commission at the "K" Club in June to raise 
funds. Needless to say, the dance was an immediate 
sccess. It is anticipated that this dance may become an 
annual event. 

In July the U.S. Soil Conservation Service fulfilled its 
contract with the Commission in completing the Town of 
Ipswich soil survey. In July, Mr. Robert Morehouse and 
Don Fuller, representing the SCS, delivered 20 copies of 



One of Ipswich 's most beautiful natural sights 

(Ipswich Today) 



the soil survey. This soil survey which delineated Ipswich 
soil types and lists their capabilities has been given to 
various town boards. The survey, along with its 
interpretative maps, will be indispensable to all town 
boards in their decisions involving land use planning. 

The Regional Field Service Group of the Harvard 
University Graduate School of Design fulfilled its contract 
with the Commission through delivery in June of their 
completed study of the Ipswich River. The study was 
addressed to the following five ofjectives: 

l.To preserve and if possible upgrade the river 
ecologically. 

2. To improve the appearance of the riverbank. 

3. To discover possibilities for long-range protection of 
the river banks against abuse and over development. 

4. To correct areas of deterioration without ignoring 
the historical importance of the river and many of 
its features. 

5. and to plan further recreational use of the river and 
its surroundings by the inhabitants of the Town. 

Already some of the findings of the study have been 
put into effect on the downtown area and the Peatfield 
Street river property. Both the report and the models of 
the downtown area have received considerable attention. 

Another project which has received considerable 
attention was the printing of the brochure entitled 
"Preliminary open space plan - Ipswich Conservation 
Commission 1972". The brochure was delivered to each 
resident with the Town's annual report. The brochure 
reflects the Conservation's thinking as well as many town 
people on the subject of open space. Goals are to preserve 
water resources, preserve the greenbelts, provide 
recreational areas and save the tax payers money. 

During the year several letters of recommendation were 
mailed to the Board of Selectmen on possible dredge and 
fill violations as related to the Hatch Act. The major 
change during the year was the passage of Legislation 
which combined the old Hatch Act and the Coastal 
Wetlands Act. The new Act is now known as the 
Wetlands Protection Act of 1972 becoming law October 
16 of this year. The new Act contains provisions of the 



56 



two old laws with several additions and now directs the 
local town conservation commission to hold hearings and 
make recommendations on applications for dredge, fill, or 
alterations of wetlands as qualified under the Act. 

One of the more enjoyable aspects of our work was 
the planting of many thousand beach grass seedlings at 
Crane's Beach as part of the dune restoration program. 
We especially wish to thank the Town's people who 
participated in the planting and, particularly, the school 
biology class and the Girl Scout organization. Through 
the Conservation Commission the Essex Conservation 
District has made available $500 Matching Funds for the 
Dune Restoration Project. 

One of the most important projects of the year which t 
we hope will be finalized by this year's annual town 
meetings is passage of a zoning bylaw establishing a 
Wetland and Water Conservancy district. A professional 
planning firm — Nash Vigier, Inc. was contracted to draft 
and prepare the bylaw. Purpose of the bylaw is to provide 
"that land in the Town of Ipswich subject to seasonal or 
periodic flooding not be used for residence or other 
purposes in such a manner as to endanger the health or 
the safety of the occupants and to protect the 
community against costs which might be incurred when 
unsuitable development occurs in marshes, flood plains, 
and other lowland areas. 

Numerous other activities took place during 1972 but 
one of the most pleasant was the receipt of the Essex 
County Soil Conservations District board of supervisors 
certificate of achievement which was awarded to the 
Conservation Commission for their efforts in maintaining 
open space and recreational management. 

In April members Jack M. Israelson retired from the 
Board and Mrs. Joan Cudhea resigned to move to San 
Francisco, California. New appointments made by Mr. 
Conti and approved by the Board of Selectmen were 
Andrew Connors and William George. 




The Ipswich River after a snow fall. (Ipswich Today) 



Members of the Commission welcomed the new 
members and all the members of the Commission wish to 
thank all the citizens whose tireless efforts to preserve the 
town's natural resources made this a most successful vear. 



4 



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57 



The Year of the Red Tide 






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Aerial view of Castle Neck looking north. The Beach Reef clam flat is submerged in the foreground. 



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IPSWICH 
CLAM 



IPSWICH SHELLFISH ADVISORY COMMISSION 

Charles R. Terrell, Chairman 

Edward Nag us 

Andrew Gianakakis 

Edward Paquin 

Joseph Kmiec 

Joseph Lauderowicz 

Henry Minichello 

Arthur Moon, ex-officio member 

The shellfisheries of Ipswich have undergone several 
intensive ordeals during 1972, but out of it has come a 
better understanding of the Town's shellfish resources. In 
the past the harvesting of soft shelled clams became so 
intricately woven in the life of the Town that its 
existence was considered as accepted fact, if not almost a 
"right" of being a coastal town. As with so many of our 
natural resources, it was always there and thus it was 
assumed it always would be there. Several factors changed 
all that in the year just past. 



58 



When a large part of the soft shell clam industry was 
destroyed in the Middle Atlantic states from Hurricane 
Agnes during June, the North Shore became one of the 
major suppliers for the industry. With the price of a 
bushel of clams rising by as much as 100%, Ipswich tried 
to meet the demand, and consequently many more and 
especially younger diggers were attracted to clam 
harvesting. In fact, through August there had been almost 
200 commercial permits issued to Town residents and 
nearly 1,500 non-commercial permits. It was evident by 
the end of the summer that some of the commission's 
past work was beginning to pay off in terms of a 
sustained yield in spite of increased clamming pressures. 

It had not been possible to determine the extent of 
effectiveness of past programs because as Labor Day 
approached, another tropical storm now had bad news for 
the North Shore Shellfisheries. As Hurricane Carrie gave a 
glancing blow to the New Englad area, the environmental 
conditions became exactingly correct for the so-called 
"red tide". For the first time in the Town's history, all 
shellfish areas were closed to harvesting, and what started 
earlier as an economic boom became overnight an 
economic nightmare. The details of the incident need 
little further explanation, because they have been all too 
vivid to those involved. Nevertheless, out of that chaos 
there have been some good and favorable lessons learned 
by the Ipswich community. Perhaps the most important is 
that no longer can its natural resources, including the 
shellfisheries, be taken for granted, rather they must be 
considered as delicate entities requiring diligent attention 
by all Ipswich residents to protect and preserve their vital 
qualities. In this way not only will the resources' future 
be insured, but also the Town's future at the same time. 

In the past year the Ipswich Shellfish Advisory 
Commission continued its mussel and algae programs by 



luring two young men to hand rake algae from several 
clam flats where it had grown quickly during July and 
was beginning to suffocate the clams, especially seed 
clams. When the red tide hit, about a dozen out of work 
clammers were hired with town and state funds for five 
weeks to clear the Beach Reef of blue mussels, which had 
spread to cover about 30% of the flat. 

Earlier in the year the commission hired Dr. Johnes K. 
Moore, an oceanographer and marine biologist from Salem 
State College, to serve as a consultant on biological 
problems, such as water analysis, plankton and clam 
populations. The commission hopes to work with Dr. 
Moore in seeking federal funds for future shellfish 
investigations. 

During Olde Ipswich Days the commission set up a 
display on the South Green to show the commission's 
activities and exhibit local, aquatic species. It was viewed 
and appreciated by many, especially because of the free, 
steamed clams. 

An effort was made to update the antiquated shellfish 
rules and regulations, and upon approval by the 
Selectmen new harvesting limits went into effect. 
Beginning in 1973 shellfish licenses will have to be 
displayed on outer clothing in holders provided by the 
commission. The commission also hopes to continue 
distributing metal "clam rings" to individuals who have 
difficulty in determining the size of a two inch clam. 

Aerial photography has been attempted by the 
commission and it is believed that this will become a 
valuable tool in recording the changes that occur in 
shellfish areas. It is hoped that such information will 
allow better estimation of clam flat sizes, water currents 
and general changes in topography. 



* 



Shellfish Constable, Arthur Moon, and little girl examine 
pile of blue mussels removed from the Beach Reef clam 
flat. 



* 



Shellfish Constable, Arthur Moon, and biologist, Dr. 
Johnes K. Moore of Salem State College examine one of 
the clam flats for new clam "seed". 




59 



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17th Century Day Chairman, John Updike reads to a costumed menage before the Whipple House. Standing: Lisa 
Key worth, Mimi Key worth, Barbara McManaway , Noelle Lloyd, Updike. Seated: Sarah McManaway, Heidi Key worth, Jamie 
Jones. (Frederick G.S. Clow, Boston and Nantucket) 



SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY DAY COMMITTEE 

John Updike 



Seventeenth-Century Day was held on Saturday, 
August 5th, this year - the tenth such occasion since 
1948, and the first since 1968. Months of preparation by 
the sponsor organizations, the Historical Society and the 
Garden Club, were climaxed by a sunny and successful 
day. Twelve hundred tour-ticket purchasers, and many 
more visitors, were attracted to the town. Net profits, 
after expenses, of over six thousand dollars were applied 
to the announced project of renovating the exterior of 
the old South Church, now the Ipswich Youth Drop-In 



Center. This renovation, now completed but for the front 
doors and the dome of the cupola, leaves some funds still 
to be devoted to "Maintaining and improving the historic 
features of Ipswich." Suggestions are welcomed. 

In addition to the customary events and exhibits on 
the South Green, young people of Ipswich presented a 
pageant on the rocks of Meetinghouse Green, and a 
concert of seventeenth-century music was performed at 
Castle Hill under the direction of Thomas Kelly. Town 
Manager Conti and his special assistant Robin Carter 
spared no efforts in preparing the town for the influx of 
visitors; the police and highway departments especially 
should be thanked for their fine co-operation. 




CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

President, Richard Banville 
Vice President, Louis Marchand 
Treasurer, Herbert Brack 
Secretary, Jane Bokron 

Encouraging community involvement has led to a very 
successful year for The Ipswich Chamber of Commerce. 

With some 25 social, civic and church groups 
participating "Olde Ipswich Week" was a huge success 
with the many thousands of visitors enjoying Ipswich 
from its beaches and old homes to historic customs and 
home-style cooking, including our famous Ipswich clams, 
to a congenial town with all its ethnic groups gathering 
together. 

A huge success was the closing-off of the downtown 
Market Street for old fashion Block Dances. We had 3 
different types of dancing, namely; Greek, Polish and 
Square Dancing, enjoyed by the many, many people. 

The Chamber of Commerce Booth on Market Square 
in 764 hours of operation from July 1, 1972 to 
September 2, 1972 compiled the following statistics: 

6256 cars stopped and asked for information 

17,157 people involved in information 

30% asked for information on beaches and recreation 

20% asked for information on historic homes 

25% asked for information on dining places 

10% asked for information on lodging 

15% asked for miscellaneous nformation 

The Chamber of Commerce was honored by the Essex 
County Tourist Council for its efforts to promote 
Ipswich, with a most limited budget, with remarkable 
results. 




INFORMATION 



f IPSWICH 

^ Chamber 
onwierct 

HOUUS DA/IY A 
^ 9:Q0a*-7:00 



\ ° 





■ These girls, among others, assisted tourists during the 
summer from the Chamber of Commerce sponsored In- 
formation Booth in the center of Town. 

(Ipswich Chronicle) 

With 43 of the town's merchants participating, The 
Chamber of Commerce held its Annual Christmas 
Promotion. $50.00 gift certificates from each merchant 
was drawn each Saturday, during the month of December. 
In all, over $2,000 was given away. Santa Claus Workshop 
(Information Booth) welcomed over 1200 children with 
lolly pops and balloons. Santa Claus made visits to the 
Cable Memorial Hospital and Coburn Home and the 
Caldwell Convalescent Home with a large fruit basket for 
each, for the patient's enjoyment. 

The Chamber of Commerce sponsored the Christmas 
Lights in the streets and The Nativity Scene on the North 
Green and awarded a Paul Revere Bowl to the best 
Christmas decorated home in the community. 



"Dancing In The Street" during Old Ipswich Week. The Chamber of Commerce sponsored many people-envolved activities. 

(Ipswich Today) 




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Robert W. Spenser stands next to a green head fly trap. 



THE ESSEX COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT equally unfortunate that this cut back should coincide 

with one of the wettest years ever experienced in the 
Robert W. Spenser, Superintendent area. 



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The year 1972 was a rather exasperating one for the 
Essex County Mosquito Control Project. Mother nature in 
providing abnormal railfall to the area also provided ideal 
conditions for almost continuous breeding of mosquitoes. 
The woodland pools which normally dry up during mid 
summer produced many consecutive broods of the insect 
summer long. The cool, cloudy, wet weather extended the 
longevity of the mosquitoes and species which ordinarily 
arc considered only as night-biters were on the wing 
during daylight hours because of the everpresent high 
humidity. 

Aside from the natural obstacles the Project was 
inadvertently caught up in the austerity program at state 
level. While the monies expended for mosquito control 
are assessed in return upon each of the twenty-two 
municipalities enrolled based on equalized valuation and 
land area, they are originally incorporated in the overall 
state budget. By failing to appropriate the full amount for 
the Essex County Project, the Great and General Court 
decreased the Fiscal 1973 budget by forty thousand 
(40,000) dollars or approximately twenty-three (23) 
percent. The direct result of this action was a reduction 
in personnel employed by the Project and a corresponding 
cut back in services rendered during the last six months 
of 1972. This reduction will also be in effect during the 
first six months of 1973. 

Because of the expense of operation and maintenance 
of heavy equipment the program of permanent work such 
as drainage ditching, and water management was severely 
curtailed and many of the planned activities necessarily 
postponed. 

It is indeed unfortunate that the Essex County 
Mosquito Control Project through no fault of its' own 
should be forced to cut back on its' services at a time 
when the public is demanding a greater effort. It is 



In spite of the above mentioned obstacles the Project 
is pleased to report the following activity in Ipswich 
during 1972: 

Prehatch or winter ice dusting -33 areas 
Application of larvicidc to open water - 64 acres 
Brushing out along brooks and streams - 600 feet 
Upland ditching with power equipment - 2,206 feet, 

off Candlcwood Road. 
Salt marsh ditching with power equipment - 26,132 

feet, off Townf Farm Road. 
Fogging to control adult mosquitoes on June 16, 23, 

30; July 7, 21 , 28; August 4, 11, 18,25. 

We wish to thank the residents of Ipswich for their 
continued cooperation and understanding and barring any 
further interference with our fiscal appropriations we look 
to 1973 as a year of further progress toward the 
reduction of the mosquito problem in Essex County. 




62 



The formula for Revenue Sharing is as follows and the details below will explain the 'practical working of Revenue 
sharing. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE 
TREASURY 

Office of the Secretary 

REVENUE SHARING ALLOCATIONS 
Availability of Entitlement Data 

The data used by the Department of the Treasury in calculat- 
ing revenue-sharing allocations for each State government and 
unit of local government pursuant to the State and Local Fiscal 
Assistance Act of 1972 (Public Law 92-512) for the first entitle- 
ment period (January 1, through June 30, 1972) has been 
provided to each government. Collective data for all of the units 
of government receiving revenue-sharing funds will be available 
from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 

This data has been compiled by the Bureau of the Census, 
and definitions of each data element are provided on this 
notice. If recipient governments have reason to believe that 
there are errors in this data, relative to these definitions and 
effective dates, they should so inform the Department in writing 
and provide the Department with whatever substantiating evidence 
is available to them no later than February 12, 1973. If the 
Department has not been so informed before that date, the data 
elements published will be determined to be correct and as such 
will constitute a final determination by the Department. 

Upon receipt of any written response from recipient govern- 
ments the Department will, as timely as practicable, substantiate 
or correct all data questioned and the recipient governments will 
be advised of the Department's findings. Those findings will 
include a final determination of the recipient government's 
revenue sharing entitlement unless, within 60 days from the date 
of those findings, tire recipient government advises the Depart- 
ment that there may still be a possibility of error, and submits 
additional evidence and documentation supplying the basis for 
their view. Any such additional evidence and documentation 
submitted will be carefully reviewed and a final determination will 
be made by the Department regarding the entitlement. 

In order to assure equitable treatment of each recipient the 
books will be kept open until all evidence and documentation 
submitted during the time periods referred to above have been 
reviewed, data determined to be erroneous corrected, and 
necessary adjustments made. 

There is one instance in which the Department has determined 
that the census data may not provide for equitable allocations. 
For cities and towns of under 500 in population, the per capita 
income is subject to substantial statistical error, and the Depart- 
ment has, therefore, determined that it will use the per capita 
income of the county area in which such unit of government is 
located as an estimate of the per capita income of that unit. 

[seal] Samuel R. Pierce, Jr., 

General Counsel. 

DATA DEFINITIONS FOR INTRASTATE 
ALLOCATIONS TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS 

POPULATION 

Population means the total resident population for an area as 
determined by the Bureau of the Census in the 1970 Census of 
Population. The census was conducted primarily through self- 
examination. Each person enumerated in the 1970 census was 
counted as an inhabitant of his usual place of residence. This 
means the place where he lives and sleeps most of the time, which 
is not necessarily his legal residence, voting residence, or domicile. 
Persons without a usual place of residence were counted where 
they were enumerated. The data collected is dated as of April 1, 
1970 and it relates to boundaries of enumeration districts as they 
existed on January 1, 1970. 

AGGREGATE INCOME 

Income or aggregate income means total money income as 
defined by the Bureau of the Census in the*1970 Census of 
Population and Housing. Information on money income for 
calendar year 1969 was collected in a 20 percent sample as part 
of the 1970 census. 

Total income is the sum of: 

1. Wage or salary income. 

2. Nonfarm net self-employment income. 

3. Farm net self-employment income. 

4. Social security or railroad retirement income. 

5. Public assistance or welfare income. 



6. All other income such as interest, dividends, veterans' 
payments, pensions, unemployment insurance, alimony, etc. 

The figures represent the amount of income regularly received 
before deductions for personal income taxes, social security, bond 
purchases, union dues, medicare deductions, etc. 

Receipts from the following sources were not included as 
income: Money received from the sale of personal property; 
capital gains; the value of income "in kind" such as food 
produced and consumed in the home or free living quarters; 
withdrawal of bank deposits; money borrowed; tax refunds; 
exchange of money between relatives living in the same house- 
hold; gifts and lump sum inheritances, insurance payments, and 
other types of lump sum receipts. 

PER CAPITA INCOME 

Per capita income of any unit of government, as define'd by the 
Bureau of Census in the 1970 Census of Population and Housing, 
is the mean income computed for all persons in that unit of 
government. Per capita income was computed from calendar year 
1969 money income data which was collected in a 20 percent 
sample as part of the 1970 Census. It is derived by dividing the 
total income of the sample by the total population of the sample. 



ADJUSTED TAXES 

The adjusted taxes for a unit of local government, as derived 
from the special revenue sharing survey conducted by the Bureau 
of the Census in 1972, are the total general purpose taxes exacted 
by the unit of government in fiscal year 1971 excluding taxes for 
schools and other education purposes. Total general purpose taxes 
include : 

1. Property taxes - County, municipal, or township taxes on 
property, real or personal, measured by value. 

2. Sales taxes — County, municipal, or township taxes, either 
general or specific, on goods and services, measured as a percent 
of sales or receipts, or as an amount per unit sold. 

a. General sales tax. 

b. Gasoline tax. 

c. Liquor tax. 

d. Cigarette and tobacco tax. 

e. Public utilities tax. 

f. Other. 

3. License, permits and other taxes — County, municipal, or 
township taxes not included in items 1 and 2 above (e.g.: poll 
taxes, license and inspection charges on occupations, and busi- 
nesses, animals, vehicles, etc.) 

a. Income payroll or earnings tax. . 

b. Motor vehicle licenses. 

c. Fees retained from tax collections by officials of the unit of 
government. 

d. Other. 

General purpose taxes do not include receipts from service 
charges, special assessments, interest earnings or fines. 

School taxes are tax revenues of the unit of government which 
are allocated for school purposes. They include taxes for current 
capital and debt service purposes as well as amounts collected for 
the governmental unit by the county or State acting as a 
collecting agent. 

The general formula for computing adjusted taxes is: 
Adjusted taxes=total general purpose taxes minus school taxes. 
When appropriations from the Governments' general fund to the 
school system form the only basis for determining school taxes 
the following formula is used: 
School taxes=school expenditures minus (school intergovernmental 

revenue plus school service charge revenue). 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL TRANSFERS OF REVENUE 

Intergovernmental transfers of revenue are amounts received by a 
unit of government from other governments in fiscal year 1971 
for use in performing specific functions or for general financial 
support. This amount is derived from the special revenue sharing 
survey conducted by the Bureau of the Census in 1972. The 
figure includes grants, shared taxes, contingent loans and reim- 
bursements for tuition costs, hospital care, construction costs, etc. 
Intergovernmental revenue does not include amounts received 
from sale of property, commodities or utility services to other 
governments. 

(1 R Doc.72-22447 Filed 12-29-72; 11:21 am) 

(Dept. Circular Public Debt Series-No. 13-72) 



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63 



* 



* 



IN MEMORIAM 




M. Charles Arthur, Sr. 

Finance Committee 

January 29, 1972 




Russell Lincoln Scahill 

Fire Department Chief 

May IS, 1972 




* 



George R. Player 

Sanitation Division 

July 29, 1972 




Charles Edward Goodhue, Jr. 

School & Finance Committees 

October 24, 1972 




Benjamin W. Homans 

Cemetery Department Superintendent 

September 11, 1972 




Leo Naguszewski 
Action, Inc. 
October 27, 1972 



-t» 



POLICE EMERGENCY 356-4343 

FIRE EMERGENCY 356-4321 



Be sure to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency clearly. Do not 
hang up until you are sure that your message has been understood. 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Payment of Taxes 

Payment of Water and Light Bills 

Billing, Water and Light 

Birth, Death, Marriage Cert. 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Civil Defense 

Dog, Hunting, Fishing Licenses 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, Registration 

Electric 

Engineering 

Fire, Routine 

Health, Sanitation, Rubbish 

Highway and Streets 

Library 

Licensing Authority 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Permits for Large Quantity Dumping 

Recreation 

Schools 



Sewer 

Veteran's Services 
Water Problems 
Youth 

MEETINGS 

Annual Town Meeting 

Annual Town Election 

Conservation Commission 

Finance Committee 

Board of Health 

Industrial Development Comm. 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Recreation & Parks Comm. 

School Committee 

Selectmen 

Historical Commission 

Cemetery Commission 

Housing Authority 

Shellfish Advisory Committee 

Youth Commission 



CALL THE TELEPHONE 

Office of the Assessor 356-4010 

Treasurer and Collector 356-3100 

Electric Light Dept 356-433 1 

Billing Office 356-4830 

Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Building Inspector 356-5333 

Cemetery Superintendent 356-3933 

Jr. High School 356-4342 

Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

School Superintendent 356-2935 

Town Clerk's Office 356-4161 

Electric Light Dept 356-433 1 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Board of Health 356-4900 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Librarian 356-4646 

Board of Selectmen 356-2262 

Fire Chief 356-4322 

Fire Department 356-4322 

Town Manager's Office 356-4848 

Recreation and Parks 356-3767 

Burley School 356-2666 

High School 356-3137 

Junior High School 356-3535 

Doyon School 356-5506 

Shatswell School . 356-2312 

Winthrop School 356-2976 

Nurse 356-5507 

356-3535 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Veteran's Agent 356-3915 

Public Works Dept 356-5591 

Recreation Dept 356-0312 



DAY & TIME 

1st Mon. in March 

2nd Mon. in March 

1st & 3rd Thurs. of ea. mo. 

Last Wed. of ea. mo. 

1st Thurs. of ea. mo. 

2nd & 4th Tues. of ea. mo. 

3rd Mon. of ea. mo. 

Every other Tues. 

2nd Wed. of ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Wed. of ea. mo. 

Every Monday 

2nd & 4th Wed. of ea. mo. 

1st Fri. of ea. mo. 

2nd Mon. of ea. mo. 

3rd Wed. of ea. mo. 

1st & 3rd Tues. of ea. mo. 



PLACE 

High School 

Precinct Polling Place 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Library 

Town Hall 

Memorial Bldg. 

Supt. Office 

Court Room 

Town Hall 

Cemetery Office 

Community Bldg. Caroline Ave. 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 



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IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 2122 00162 125 3 




THE ANCIENT SYMBOL OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

WHEN YOU NEED HELP CALL THE FISH NUMBER 

IN IPSWICH 3564342 



(Please do not throw me away. Fold and put me in your phone book.) 

YOU MAY ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THE FISH FROM YOUR NEWSPAPER OR RADIO. 
THE FISH IS SIMPLY A GROUP OF CONCERNED PEOPLE IN THIS COMMUNITY WHO 
WISH TO EXPRESS THEIR LOVE AND CONCERN FOR THEIR NEIGHBORS. THIS 
INCLUDES YOU. WHEN YOU CALL THE FISH NUMBER, A 24-HOUR ANSWERING 
SERVICE WILL ANSWER AND PUT YOU IN TOUCH WITH A MEMBER OF FISH. WE 
ARE UNTRAINED, ORDINARY PEOPLE WHO WILL TRY TO BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR 
TO YOU. THERE IS NO CHARGE OR OBLIGATION FOR ANY SERVICE FISH 
PROVIDES, IF WE CAN HELP YOU, IT WILL BE OUR PRIVILEGE. 



*EMERGENCY TRANSPORTATION 



LOCATE NEEDED ARTICLES 



♦PROVIDE A MEAL 



COMPANIONSHIP FOR THE ELDERLY 



♦BABY-SITTING 



PROVIDE RIDES FOR SHUT-INS 



♦HOUSEWORK FOR THE SICK 



♦EMERGENCY LODGING 



INFORMATION SERVICE 

(when help is needed) 



♦Starred items can be provided only on an emergency basis. 



IF YOU DESIRE TO HELP CALL THE FISH NUMBER. 



S3 



ROWLEY PRINTING. INC 

ROWLEY. MASS. 



* 



RED TIDE 



* 



The occurrence of the Red Tide resulted in a 
negative impact upon our shellfish industries in 
Ipswich. It also resulted in intensive study and 
work by the Ipswich Shellfish Advisory Com- 
mission. In testing key clam flats in the Town it 
is not known whether the Red Tide will reoccur 
or not, but the continuing research will aid the 
Town and the State Public Health Department in 
analyzing any future occurrence. 




Gonyaulax 
tamarensis, 
marine 
dinoflagellate 



RED TIDE ORGANISM 



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The organism, which irresponsible for the so 
called Red Tide is a minute plant composed of a 
single cell and can only be seen with difficulty 
using a microscope. Its ^scientific name is Gon- 
yaulax tamarensis and while some scientists 
maintain it is an animal, most place it in the 
plant kingdom. It belongs to a group of organ- 
isms called dinoflagellates which literally means 
"great Whip" because they possess two long, 
whip-like, appendages used for movement. One 
flagellum, or whip, surrounds the animal in a 
groove and probably acts as a stabilizer, while the 
other trails behind for propulsion. The organism 



possesses chlorophyll which can be yellow green 
to yellow brown, but which can carry on photo- 
synthesis as would most any plant. Thus, while 
the organism has some animal characteristics 
(movement) it also has plant characteristics 
(photosynthesis) . 

The organism has been recognized for many 
years in Canada as the causative agent of para- 
lytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) but there are no 
past records of its occurrence along the Massa- 
chusetts coast. If the environmental conditions of 
temperature, salinity and nutrients are just right, 
then the stage can be set in the ocean for a 
"bloom". This is a phenomenon where many 
billions of cells are produced in a relatively short 
time span and may lead to a discoloration of the 
water, either reddish or yellowish, because of the 
super abundance of the organism. 

Clams and other shellfish become the vehicle 
through which paralytic shellfish poisoning can be 
transported to man and other animals. Shellfish 
that have two shells, such as soft shell clams, 
quahogs, scallops, mussels, etc., feed by taking in 
sea water, straining small pieces of food from it, 
and expelling the water. In this manner the Red 
Tide organism can be ingested by shellfish, which 
then use the organisms as a source of nutrition. 
Even though the Red Tide organism contains a 
very powerful, toxic substance, most shellfish 
have built up an immunity to it and therefore are 
not affected by it. Nevertheless, when the shell- 
fish are eaten by birds and mammals, including 
man, the toxin can be very harmful to these 
individuals. 



* 



ABOUT THE BACK COVER 



* 



The back cover depicts an interpretation of the 
Red Tide by Artist Frank Wilkish. 




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